Tag Archives: Hispanic

Michael Medved: The Obnoxious Term “Latinx”

The term “Latinx”, has become the increasingly common substitute for the terms “Latino” or “Hispanic” in the politically correct, prestige press. The “For Kids” section of the New York Times helpfully explained that “the X is an effort to make the word more inclusive, because it accounts for a wider spectrum of gender identities than just male and female.”

The problem for this self-proclaimed “inclusive” approach is that Hispanics themselves overwhelmingly reject it. In an August Pew Research Survey, 61 percent preferred the word “Hispanic” while another 29 percent chose “Latino”, amounting 90 percent of Hispanic Americans. Only 3 percent said they used “Latinx” to describe themselves, while 12 percent who had even heard of the word, said they actively disliked it. The crushing disregard for the clumsy formulation “Latinx” provides a reassuring reminder that the cutting-edge activists of the radical left won’t make easy headway in the Hispanic community, with its solid, more traditional, cultural values.

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Michael Medved: Glib, Simplistic and False Explanations for Murderous Violence

The horrific shooting in El Paso shows the folly behind glib, simplistic explanations for deadly violence. Twenty-two deaths in this single incident nearly equals the 23 victims in all El Paso murders last year. For more than a decade, this border metropolis of 680,000 has been one of America’s safest cities—despite widespread fire-arm ownership in Texas and limited gun regulation, exposing the illogic behind leftist attempts to blame deadly incidents on law-abiding gun owners.

Meanwhile, El Paso’s population is 82 percent Latino, with its low crime history undermining demagogues who connect Hispanic immigration with high levels of violence. In fact, three of the safest big cities anywhere—El Paso, San Jose and San Diego—each have disproportionately huge Latino populations, while cities with the highest murder rates—St. Louis, Baltimore, New Orleans, Detroit and Cleveland—have at most 7 percent Latino population, less than half the national average.

We must reject simplistic and false explanations in order to responsibly address murderous gun violence.

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Michael Medved: “Lessons Learned” on Oscar Night

The over-riding message from this year’s Academy Awards? “We’ve Learned Our Lesson!” Responding to the #MeToo movement and reports of erotic exploitation and sexism, presenters and Oscar winners frequently alluded to the scandal and made sanctimonious pledges to crack down on wrong-doers.

After complaints in recent years about scant Oscar attention to people of color, numerous black and Hispanic celebrities appeared on stage and Latinos won some of the most important Oscars—including Best Picture, Best Director, and best Foreign Language Film.

And after last year’s epic snafu with Warren Beatty announcing the wrong Best Picture winner, this year he received the right envelope.

Despite such improvements, a long predictable ceremony, with no blockbusters in serious contention, yielded some of the lowest TV ratings in Academy history.

Have the lessons really been learned?

Time will tell.

 

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Michael Medved: Not as Fragmented as the Pessimists Presume

Opioid

A major study from the Pew Research Center should reassure those of us who worry about the fragmentation of America based on race and ethnicity. Among the 43 million U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry, a full 5 million don’t identify themselves as “Hispanic” or “Latino” at all.

Moreover, among families who’ve lived in the United States four generations or more—in other words, those with parents and grand-grandparents who are American born—Hispanic identification is only fifty-fifty. This means Latinos follow the familiar pattern of other immigrant groups, like the Irish or Italians, who de-emphasize ethnic identity after several generations in the U.S.

This contrasts with patterns of racial identity, where the great majority of African-Americans still describe themselves as black, even after several centuries in the U.S. Heavy intermarriage plays a big part in the increasingly rapid assimilation of Hispanics: among married third generation Latinos, the big majority—nearly two-thirds, in fact—have a non-Latino spouse.

Perhaps we’re not as fragmented as the pessimists presume.

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