Tag Archives: Hitler

Hugh Hewitt: Tangible Help for Today’s Heroes

“Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

So Prime Minister Winston Churchill declared to the British House of Commons in 1940 as the Battle of Britain raged in the skies and the Royal Air Force defended the United Kingdom from Hitler’s Luftwaffe.

That salute from Churchill echoes across 80 years to this day and is amplified in the praise for every front-line responder—health-care professionals, hospital staffs, nursing home workers and so on.

There’s an idea circulating through Donald Trump’s White House right now that would indeed grant eligibility to the GI Bill’s benefits to all those front-line responders who are battling the virus every day.

We should do it. Now.

Yes: We should clap these workers to and from work when we can, but we should also create for them a concrete set of economic thank-yous for those seeing us through the crisis.

It would be a tangible help for the heroes.

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Michael Medved: A Great Movie’s Misleading Message

Opioid

The magnificent new Churchill movie, “Darkest Hour,” easily counts among the year’s best, but a crucial scene sends a message the real Sir Winston would have hated.

In the movie, the Prime Minister wavers over starting peace talks with Hitler, and on the way to a cabinet meeting, he wanders into the Underground—London’s subway. He asks the opinions of ordinary Englishmen in his car, and—only when they tell him to keep fighting at all costs—does he convey that message to Parliament in the famous, “we shall fight on the beaches” speech.

It’s a touching sequence, but totally misleading: Churchill never rode the Underground, and never shared the comforting, populist notion that leaders should take direction and inspiration from the common man. Like Reagan, Thatcher or Lincoln, Churchill knew that great leaders must provide inspiration and direction to the masses, not the other way around.

That’s a role today’s leading figures must learn, and embrace.

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