Tag Archives: Hoover Institute

David Davenport: The Rise of Millennial Voters


A wave of change is coming in the 2018 and 2020 elections:  the rise of millennial voters.  In those elections, millennials, born between 1980-2000, will finally pass baby boomers as the largest voting generation.

What we know is that millennials hold different political views than their boomer parents.  They are more fearful, saying 4-1 that America is on the wrong track.  They believe less in political institutions such as Congress and the President.  They are more open to socialism, less committed to freedom. Seventy-one percent say we need a new political party.

What we don’t know is how many millennials will actually show up to vote.  So far, their voting percentage is low:  only half or less of eligible voters in 2016.

It seems likely that millennial concerns will change the conversation in future elections, but we’ll have to wait and see whether they actually vote and change the outcome.

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Lanhee Chen: A Potential of Breakthrough on North Korea

President Trump shocked the world when he agreed to meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.  While there’s reason to be skeptical of Kim’s motives and tactics, we should all acknowledge that the President has managed to secure a major diplomatic breakthrough in the crisis.

Now comes the hard work of making the meeting a productive one. North Korea has long dangled the prospect of disarmament in return for various concessions from America and its allies. Never before has the rogue regime been willing to keep to its promises, or to truly negotiate in good faith.  It’s possible the North Koreans are simply using the meeting as a ploy—an opportunity to make “asks” that will be impossible for American negotiators to agree to.

President Trump deserves credit for getting us to this point. But it’s important that he remains vigilant as we approach the murky waters ahead.

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The Tax Bill Needs Follow-On Spending Cuts

Compromise

Although a tax cut may have been a nice Christmas gift, it needs some follow-on spending cuts to work.  At best, Republicans have eaten their dessert first, waiting to eat their spending cut vegetables later; at worst, they will have increased the federal deficit by another trillion dollars or more.

 

By most estimates, even stimulating economic growth will not fully pay for the tax cut.  Republicans will now have to undertake the politically courageous step of cutting federal spending.

 

It will be difficult to make spending cuts without touching Medicare or Social Security, which President Trump has said are off limits. Meanwhile there is pressure to undo the sequester, automatic cuts on spending no one liked, but which have at least kept spending growth down.

 

Ideally, Republicans would have disciplined themselves to do tax and spending cuts at the same time. Tax cuts may come and go, but the federal debt remains forever, it seems. And—without spending cuts—it grows.

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Salem Media at the White House As Tax Reform Effort Begins

White House, Obamacare, shooting, Paris Climate Agreement

Townhall Review – September 21, 2017
Mike Gallagher and Hugh Hewitt are invited to the White House to interview President Trump and Vice President Pence. President Trump discusses healthcare and media bias, while VP Pence discusses the administration’s focus on tax cuts and foreign relations. Sally Pipes, president of the Pacific Research Institute, joins Larry Elder to talk about Trump’s executive order on healthcare. Grover Norquist, founder and President of Americans for Tax Reform, sits in with Dan Proft to share insights on President Trump’s tax reform. Hugh Hewitt invites Israel’s Ambassador to the U.S, Ron Dermer, on to discuss the conflict between the Kurdish and Iraqi forces in Kirkuk. Dennis Prager looks at a piece from author and playwright Andrew Klavan in light of the Harvey Weinstein scandal. Lanhee Chen, of the Hoover Institute, and Cory Garner, chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, discuss the future of healthcare.

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David Davenport: Tax Reform Should Not Increase The National Debt

Compromise

This is David Davenport of the Hoover Institution for Townhall.com.

One more dilemma for our leaders in Washington is that we desperately need tax reform, but we can’t afford to increase the national debt.

The debt is already large and growing. Our leaders say it’s nearly $15 trillion, but that doesn’t count another $5 trillion of debt to our own government, making the real number closer to $20 trillion. And Senator Ben Sasse has recently reminded us that even that number doesn’t count entitlement bills coming due that we can’t pay, perhaps pushing the number as high as $75 trillion.

But there are reasons to worry that it’s about to get worse. First, rising interest rates could make the debt more expensive. Second, Trump’s tax reform could bring in even less revenue. He’s counting on stimulating growth, but it will take a lot of growth to pay for lower tax rates.

Senator Mitch McConnell is right to say that tax reform must be revenue neutral to keep from growing the national debt.

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Lanhee Chen: When America Leads

Tax Reform

Last week, the Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad likely launched a chemical weapons attack that killed over seventy of his own people and injured many others. Assad is guilty of many heinous acts against the Syrian people, which together have triggered one of the great refugee and humanitarian crises in modern history. Assad’s latest attack included the use of advanced nerve agents—its victims included numerous babies and children.

In 2012, President Obama announced that the use of chemical weapons by Assad would breach a “red line” that would trigger a U.S. military response. A year later, Assad used those weapons, and nothing happened. This was but one of the many foreign policy failures of the previous administration.

President Trump should be applauded for taking decisive action to attack the air base from which Assad launched his vicious attack. There are no easy answers in Syria, though, and it may not be the last time that America needs to exercise her military might.

But we know for sure is that the world is a better place when America leads.

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