Tag Archives: Hoover Institution

David Davenport: Coronavirus and the National Debt

What do coronavirus and the national debt have in common?  The answer is China.  Due in part to secrecy and poor management in China, suddenly the world confronts a major pandemic.  We’re reminded how interconnected our world is and how vulnerable we are to China.

Perhaps this is a reason to take the national debt more seriously.  China owns approximately 5 percent of our debt and some surprise there could have a major economic effect on the US.  It could be the next housing bubble and we are woefully unprepared.

A recent report by the Congressional Budget Office says our debt will equal 98% of the nation’s total economic output by 2030.  President Trump promised to eliminate the deficit in 8 years but what we’ve seen is a nearly 50 percent increase.

Let’s tell Washington to take the debt seriously and beware a bad surprise.

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Lanhee Chen: Trump Bringing More Transparency and Accountability to Government Bureaucracies


It’s not something that gets a lot of attention from the media, but the regulatory reforms undertaken by the Trump Administration have been critical to keeping the American economy strong.  President Trump has led efforts to roll back red tape by cutting over 8 regulations for every new one that’s been put in place.  This action alone will save American households an estimated $3,100 each year.

Federal bureaucracies have too often abused their power to impose unreasonable burdens on Americans.  In 2014, for example, the EPA wanted to impose $20 million in fines on a family that built an environmentally-friendly pond for their horses.  President Trump is bringing more transparency and accountability where it’s badly needed.

Now, the Trump Administration is working with states and local governments to cut regulations and costs and harmonize regulations at different levels of government.  This will lead to even more cost savings and a stronger economy for the American people.

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Jim Caviezel, Star of “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” Issues Challenge to Moviegoers


Townhall Review – March 31, 2018

Hugh Hewitt talks with Lanhee Chen, policy expert and Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, about President Donald Trump naming former United Nations ambassador John Bolton as his next National Security Advisor, which has been criticized by some left-wing pundits. Michael Medved takes on the media’s coverage of The March for Our Lives that took place in Washington D.C. last week. The movie “Paul, Apostle of Christ” opened in theaters last weekend and the movie’s star, Jim Caviezel, discusses his passion for his faith with Salem host Mike Gallagher. Charlotte Pence, daughter of Vice President Mike Pence, has a newly-released children’s book, “Marlon Bundo: A Day in the Life of the Vice President.” Karen Pence, the Second Lady, wife to Mike Pence, and the illustrator for the book, joins her daughter in a conversation with Larry Elder. Michael Medved takes on former Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens’ call to eliminate the Second Amendment. Dennis Prager takes one more look at the March for Our Lives.

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Lanhee Chen: A Spending Problem

single-payer

President Trump earned significant praise for his first State of the Union Address—and for good reason. It presented an affirmative vision for what unified Republican governance can accomplish. It also laid out policy priorities to keep the homeland secure and strengthen our economy. One thing that was missing, however, was any mention of our growing deficits and national debt. Washington is spending more money than it has and more than it should—and lawmakers from both parties seem perfectly content to continue on the path we’re on. This spending requires us to borrow money from foreign adversaries, hurts our economy’s ability to grow and leaves our kids and grandkids with the bill.

 

A change in course is desperately needed. Indeed, reining in spending is never politically easy. That’s why it will take a leader willing to buck trends and attack the special interests—and perhaps even some in his own party—to get the job done.

 

Here’s to hoping that Donald Trump can be that leader.

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Jittery Markets, the Memo and a defender of Masculinity

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — February 10, 2018

Kimberly Strassel, of the Wall Street Journal, speaks with Dennis Prager about why the howling and protests came from Democrat, FBI, and Justice Department members following the release of “the memo.”  Mike Gallagher catches up with CNBC’s Larry Kudlow for an analysis on the economy, of which the Dow Jones Industrial tanked spectacularly earlier in the week.  Hugh Hewitt speaks with Congressman Mike Gallagher about a notorious figure who may have provided retired British Spy Christopher Steele with information contained in the “dossier.” Michael Medved sits in with Dr. Larry Diamond, a Sr. Fellow at Stanford University‘s Hoover Institution, to discuss the demise of democracy, if Putin could have his way. While on with Michael Medved, Canadian psychologist Jordan Peterson, author of “Twelve Rules for your Life,” shares how his masculine ideas are “subversive to identity politics.” Ed Martin, the host of Salem’s 1380 the Answer in St. Louis, invites Hugh Hewitt on his show to discuss what when wrong with the FISA warrant scandal.  Larry Elder shares about President Trump’s “treasonous” comment following the State of the Union address.

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David Davenport: Jerry Brown’s Blue Christmas

California governor Jerry Brown has been everywhere, preaching the gospel of blue-state California. California wildfires are the curse of climate change, he told 60 Minutes, while he whisks off to yet another climate conference in Paris, warning that the world is on the road to hell. He says the new federal tax cuts are a “monstrosity,” while he raises taxes at home.

Brown has turned California into a blue-state model of governance, but all is not calm or bright. Even with higher taxes and Silicon Valley growth, the state budget has a deficit and its pension deficit has grown dramatically.

Meanwhile jobs continue to flee the state in the face of high labor costs, high taxes and over-regulation. California has the highest poverty rate in the nation. The cost of housing is sky-high and the roads are old and gridlocked.

Much has been made of Governor Sam Brownback’s failing red-state experiment in Kansas, but Jerry Brown’s blue state Christmas left lumps of coal in many stockings.

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David Davenport: Balancing Religious Rights With Health Care

Compromise

This is David Davenport of the Hoover Institution for Townhall.com.

Public policy is full of difficult dilemmas, tough cases where there are strong interests on both sides.  Such dilemmas are not usually solved as much as they are managed.

That’s why two federal departments recently expanded the rights of religious employers.  During the Obama years, the federal government had required religious employers to provide birth control coverage in their health insurance plans even when contrary to their religious beliefs.  And the government had limited the rights of religious employers to hire or favor people who shared their beliefs.

This action properly swings the pendulum back in favor of religious rights, which are protected by the First Amendment.  Civil rights are also constitutionally protected, which is what creates the tension.  In the end, both rights are powerful, but neither is absolute.

A liberal president pushes too far in one direction and a conservative administration appropriately pushes back.  Ultimately, the Supreme Court may well have to decide how to manage this difficult dilemma.

I’m David Davenport.

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