Tag Archives: Hoover Institution

Violent Unrest and Coronavirus Concerns as Election Day Approaches


Townhall Review – July 25, 2020

Hugh Hewitt talks with NBC Correspondent Steve Kornacki about the COVID-19 effect on the 2020 Presidential Campaign.

Sebastian Gorka and Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Ken Cuccinelli talk about the makings of a real revolution going on today in some major American cities.

Mark Davis and Dr. (Admiral) Brett Giroir, Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services, talk about how we are doing as a country to get ourselves free of the pandemic.

Sebastian Gorka turns to Victor Davis Hanson, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, about the cultural revolution.

Kevin McCullough and Lanhee Chen talk about getting our kids back to school.

Steve Cortes talks with Steven Mosher, President of the Population Research Center, about China’s responsibility for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dennis Prager and Bjorn Lomborg talk about global warming and his book, “False Alarm.”

Larry Elder looks at news coverage of local black police officers in the cities of Portland and Minneapolis.

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Davenport: Bending the Wrong Curve


Thanks to the coronavirus crisis, we have a new vocabulary, including “bending the curve” of the disease to protect the public health system from collapse.

But other curves should be bent upward and not down including America’s civic education.

Recent national test scores show once again that young people do not know American history or how their government works.  Only 24% of 8th graders tested as “proficient” in government and proficiency in history dropped to a pitiful 15%.  Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos rightly called the test results “stark and inexcusable.”
But these scores have been low for years and little has been done.  It’s time that we require students to study as much civics and history as they do math and science.  It’s past time that we demand our students understand the country they will soon be running.

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Davenport: Celebrating Rugged Individualism


One lesson from the coronavirus crisis is that American rugged individualism is still alive.  While many wait for government to solve the problem, countless Americans are at work on it.

Perfume companies and distilleries retooled to make sanitizer, automakers manufacture ventilators, architects make face masks. Everything from education to funerals has reinvented.

Rugged individualism was prized on the Western frontier but is now attacked as selfish and out of date.  But when a crisis comes, we’re glad it’s there.

One misunderstanding about rugged individualism is that it stands against community, but just as pioneers traveled in wagon trains and built houses together, Americans today help one another with meals, hotel rooms, and groceries. Generosity abounds.

When the story of the Covid-19 crisis is written, rugged individualism should be a hero.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus and the National Debt

What do coronavirus and the national debt have in common?  The answer is China.  Due in part to secrecy and poor management in China, suddenly the world confronts a major pandemic.  We’re reminded how interconnected our world is and how vulnerable we are to China.

Perhaps this is a reason to take the national debt more seriously.  China owns approximately 5 percent of our debt and some surprise there could have a major economic effect on the US.  It could be the next housing bubble and we are woefully unprepared.

A recent report by the Congressional Budget Office says our debt will equal 98% of the nation’s total economic output by 2030.  President Trump promised to eliminate the deficit in 8 years but what we’ve seen is a nearly 50 percent increase.

Let’s tell Washington to take the debt seriously and beware a bad surprise.

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Lanhee Chen: Trump Bringing More Transparency and Accountability to Government Bureaucracies


It’s not something that gets a lot of attention from the media, but the regulatory reforms undertaken by the Trump Administration have been critical to keeping the American economy strong.  President Trump has led efforts to roll back red tape by cutting over 8 regulations for every new one that’s been put in place.  This action alone will save American households an estimated $3,100 each year.

Federal bureaucracies have too often abused their power to impose unreasonable burdens on Americans.  In 2014, for example, the EPA wanted to impose $20 million in fines on a family that built an environmentally-friendly pond for their horses.  President Trump is bringing more transparency and accountability where it’s badly needed.

Now, the Trump Administration is working with states and local governments to cut regulations and costs and harmonize regulations at different levels of government.  This will lead to even more cost savings and a stronger economy for the American people.

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Jim Caviezel, Star of “Paul, Apostle of Christ,” Issues Challenge to Moviegoers


Townhall Review – March 31, 2018

Hugh Hewitt talks with Lanhee Chen, policy expert and Research Fellow at the Hoover Institution, about President Donald Trump naming former United Nations ambassador John Bolton as his next National Security Advisor, which has been criticized by some left-wing pundits. Michael Medved takes on the media’s coverage of The March for Our Lives that took place in Washington D.C. last week. The movie “Paul, Apostle of Christ” opened in theaters last weekend and the movie’s star, Jim Caviezel, discusses his passion for his faith with Salem host Mike Gallagher. Charlotte Pence, daughter of Vice President Mike Pence, has a newly-released children’s book, “Marlon Bundo: A Day in the Life of the Vice President.” Karen Pence, the Second Lady, wife to Mike Pence, and the illustrator for the book, joins her daughter in a conversation with Larry Elder. Michael Medved takes on former Supreme Court justice John Paul Stevens’ call to eliminate the Second Amendment. Dennis Prager takes one more look at the March for Our Lives.

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Lanhee Chen: A Spending Problem

single-payer

President Trump earned significant praise for his first State of the Union Address—and for good reason. It presented an affirmative vision for what unified Republican governance can accomplish. It also laid out policy priorities to keep the homeland secure and strengthen our economy. One thing that was missing, however, was any mention of our growing deficits and national debt. Washington is spending more money than it has and more than it should—and lawmakers from both parties seem perfectly content to continue on the path we’re on. This spending requires us to borrow money from foreign adversaries, hurts our economy’s ability to grow and leaves our kids and grandkids with the bill.

 

A change in course is desperately needed. Indeed, reining in spending is never politically easy. That’s why it will take a leader willing to buck trends and attack the special interests—and perhaps even some in his own party—to get the job done.

 

Here’s to hoping that Donald Trump can be that leader.

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