Tag Archives: Impeachment

Hugh Hewitt: Against Fast-Track Impeachment

A fast-track impeachment of President Trump would not be justice. It would be pointless revenge, a very anti-American sentiment in action.

The so-called “Roman revolution” began around 60 B.C. and continued for 75 years, by the count of British historian Sir Ronald Syme—whose work remains the go-to source on how republics—including the greatest one until ours, Rome—collapsed. Republics do so when opposing parties within them continually raise the stakes, the rhetoric, then the violence, and finally the arsenal of political weaponry.

President Trump did a deeply reckless thing when he spoke before his supporters as they assembled.

But I do not believe there is conclusive evidence that Trump intended the storming of the Capitol, or any sort of sedition.

An impeachment now would leave no time for the president to present evidence of his contrary intent or any mitigating factors.

What ought to drive discussions at this moment is what’s best for the country—now and hereafter.

Passions are running high—which is why this is exactly the moment to allow them to cool.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: Framing the Trump Legacy

Donald Trump’s legacy will be framed by his actions between now and the inauguration.

He won in 2016 against all odds—and went on to four years of knockdown battles with the political, media and legal establishments.

He awakened the American people to the threat from the Chinese Communist Party, brought new peace and alliances in the Middle East, isolated the rogue regime in Iran and rebuilt the U.S. military.

He saw through three—count them, three—Supreme Court justices and more than 220 judges total. He can claim the first realignment since Ronald Reagan in 1980—all in the face of the most partisan impeachment in U.S. history.

His actions over the next 60 days though can frame his legacy and secure that place in U.S. history.

They ought to be focused on Operation Warp Speed delivering vaccines and therapeutics while the nation and the world witnesses a smooth transition of power.

It will be a glorious pivot in the story.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Israel’s “Un-Super” Monday

On March 3rd, Americans in 14 states will vote in primaries collectively known as “Super Tuesday,” but the day before, Israelis will cast ballots for the third time in less than a year and few citizens see anything “super” about it.

Polling indicates yet another tight race, with neither the center-right Likud Party of Prime Minister Bibi Netanyahu nor the center-left Blue and White Party of General Benny Gantz winning enough parliamentary seats to assemble a government. This time the pressure for the two big parties to join a “national unity government” may become overwhelming, with Netanyahu and Gantz taking turns as Prime Minister. Israelis want leaders to put aside ambitions and animosities for the sake of the country.

In America, after the bitterness of impeachment and the brutal battle for the Democratic nomination, the public may want our leaders to do something similar—placing patriotism above pettiness and compromise above confrontation.

Read More »

David Davenport: Trump Won Impeachment on Both Law and Politics

It turns out Nancy Pelosi was right on one thing: The Democrats should not have pursued impeachment in an election year. Now, President Trump has won on both the law and the politics of the impeachment battle.

The 2020 election will again be about turning out a candidate’s base, rather than winning the middle. Trump, especially, has devoted himself fully to turning out and winning his base. Meanwhile, the Democrats—split between progressives and moderates—are still looking for their base.

Without question, the Democrats’ move to impeach the president has stirred up Trump’s base more than theirs. The Trump team successfully argued that the relatively weak impeachment case brought in an election year was, in effect, an effort to take away the people’s vote. On the heels of impeachment, the president’s approval rating is up.

Democrats now face a high price for their political miscalculation.

Read More »