Tag Archives: Jerry Bowyer

Jerry Bowyer: A Vacancy on the Court and a Spending Pattern We Cannot Afford

Democrats and the media are attacking Republicans for pushing ahead with a new Supreme Court nominee while, allegedly, dragging their feet on a coronavirus relief bill.

There’s just one problem: the coronavirus bill put forward by Democrats is a dangerous expansion of the federal government that puts our economy at even more risk of fiscal collapse.

Though we don’t hear about it much anymore, the United States’ debt-to-GDP ratio has increased dramatically in the 21st century. When George W. Bush took office, we had a debt ratio of under 60 percent. Today, we have a debt ratio of over 100 percent—107 percent to be precise.

In simple English, that means our government owes more than our entire economy produces in a year. America simply cannot afford more of these immense spending bills.

Republicans are right to reject the Democrat’s short-sighted, ridiculous proposal. Imagine the spending binge if Democrats gain the presidency too.

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Bowyer: Pro-Growth Policies Bring Record Recovery in Unemployment Rate


During the worst of the shutdown of our nation’s economy at the front end of the pandemic, America’s elite media outlets were quick to tell us about the largest increase in unemployment in American history.

But they seem far less interested in telling us about the largest decrease in unemployment ever recorded since the recovery has begun.

As of this week the unemployment rate has dropped from a peak of almost 15 percent to about 8 ½ percent. That puts unemployment at levels which we saw during most of Obama’s first term. After the great recession of 2007-2009, it took three years for the labor markets to bounce back to the levels we see now—only three months into a recovery from the pandemic.

Policy matters, and pro-growth policies make a country much more resilient—even in the face of horrendous setbacks.

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Jerry Bowyer: A Challenge to the Progressive Partisans in the World of Finance

The Trump Administration is proposing two major actions to add political balance to the stock market environment.

First, labor secretary Eugene Scalia is reforming pensions—looking at what are called “Environmental Social Governance Funds.” They purport to be about better investing, but in reality they are a clever way to advance a progressive ideology. Secretary Scalia wants to refocus pension funds so that they actually fund pensions—and not pander to climate change activists.

Second, the SEC is going after shareholder advisory services—where annual meetings include opaque votes on issues shareholders know nothing about. The bias—no surprise—is to the left. Now they’ll be required to disclose their recommendations to public companies and publicize the companies’ responses.

The new rules are a serious challenge to the dominance of progressive partisans in the world of finance.

It’s a welcome pushback from the Trump administration all Americans ought to support.

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Jerry Bowyer: How Do We Respond?

These are tense and unsettling times for our nation—with ongoing protests in many of our major cities and a sense of unease about how the next incident may further inflame things.

So: How should we respond to protestors who are either violent or aggressive to the point of interfering with normal life?

Certainly not by returning violence for violence. Not by aggressive counter-demonstrations. And not by any sort of vigilante activity.

We can’t fight evil with evil.

Lasting social change always comes from peaceful appeals to the broad middle class in America.

So when they riot, let’s focus on the wise response.

Instead of filling the streets with angry counter-protests, let’s fill the ballot box with our protest vote.

When they riot, we register.

When they vent, we vote.

And when they slap us on the right cheek, let’s cast the right vote—head to our polling station or home to our absentee ballots … and we vote for law and order.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Business Community and Our Current Crisis

The respected research firm The Morning Consult just released new findings about how Americans want the business community to respond to our current crisis.

At the top of the list, they want businesses to set up a fund to help small businesses recover from looting, with a net positive approval of almost 50 percent.

Towards the bottom of the list we see things like supporting protestors on social media.

There’s no real consensus on statements of support—whether for protestors or for the police.

The bottom line is that people want companies to actually help, not to pose, and the group they want helped are the victims of the looting and rioting.

Facile expressions of woke solidarity are not taken seriously by customers. The people see past it.

Businesses should shift towards more even-handed and constructive responses or they risk losing the respect of their customers.

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Jerry Bowyer: Hamilton Film in Cancel Culture Crosshairs

The fabulously successful play and now film “Hamilton” is now under a lot of criticism. On race, Alexander Hamilton was ahead of his time—but not 200 years ahead of his time, so I guess we shouldn’t be surprised that the film about him is now in the crosshairs of cancel culture.

I can see another reason why violent extremists might be opposed to the play. In a rap battle in which Thomas Jefferson pressures George Washington to support the French Revolution, Washington rejects the idea of street violence:

“The people are leading!”

“The people are rioting! There’s a difference! Frankly it’s a little disquieting you would let your ideals blind you to reality!”

In the play and in reality, Hamilton and Washington were both skeptical about violence in the streets. Maybe all those who are either celebrating or sympathetic to the violence today should worried about the movie’s popularity as well.

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Jerry Bowyer: Big Tech Companies Are in Denial

Tech companies are in denial about the risks associated with political bias. They repeatedly feign ignorance before congressional committees and pretend to have no idea what shareholders are talking about when the issue is brought up at annual meetings. I know this from personal experience.

These executives are typically dismissive as though the issue isn’t even worth a discussion.

Well, maybe they’d better listen to the president of the company which in many ways built the modern information economy: Microsoft and their current CEO—Brad Smith. He recently told Neil Cavuto that “we in the tech sector need to step up” when it comes to inclusion of different political views.

So: the denial phase is over.

Microsoft is too big to be written off.

Silicon Valley has a thumb on the scale when it comes to conservatives. It’s up to them to restore our confidence.

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