Tag Archives: Jerry Bowyer

Jerry Bowyer: China and the Coronavirus

Amidst the chaos surrounding the coronavirus, it’s worth asking how it got to the point of our now global pandemic. We should not overlook or quickly move past China’s authoritarian, messianic government.

Remember—as the Wall Street Journal reported—one of the very first doctors to discover the outbreak was accused of “spreading rumors.” Another was forced to write a letter apologizing for the “negative impact” his warning had.

The Chinese government is exceptionally harsh on anyone that questions the benevolence and competence of the Communist Party.

That’s how the Chinese cult of personality works. That’s why they persecute the Church.

What kind of country would punish doctors for trying to prevent a plague? The kind that has replaced God with the state.

I’m not pre-occupied with calling it the Chinese coronavirus or the Wuhan virus. But there is no doubt that the Chinese government does bear unique culpability.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Economy and the Coronavirus

While we all wait to see the long-term economic impact of the coronavirus, it worth a moment to look at the economic data before the virus.

By practically every measure, the economy in January and February was not only solid, but trending upwards. Trade war uncertainty was off the radar screen and job creation was well over a quarter-million per month.

House purchases were also trending up well.

Whatever economic problems this virus brings, it will be that natural disaster’s fault and not the fault of the policy mix.

Once we get past the anxiety about coronavirus, we’re likely to see a sharp and strong recovery.

The Trump administration has proposed temporary payroll tax cuts—an idea that should happen sooner rather than later, allowing plenty of time for people to feel the recovery before they go to the polls in November.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Real Point in Diversity

The point of “diversity” in the marketplace should be for people with different points of view contribute different things to the business.

But ideologues today typically use diversity as little more than a code-word for identity politics. They don’t care about genuine diversity—diversity that would include different points of view, different worldviews. In truth: They really just want progressives from various identity groups.

According to a new study by the Religious Freedom and Business Foundation, this thinking is now dominant in the corporate world. Among Fortune 100 companies, “protected categories” such as race and gender were emphasized by corporations over religion by a factor of 34 to 1.

Corporations love to talk about “diversity” and “inclusivity”—but their concern is really only skin deep.

It’s time to go deeper and add religious and viewpoint diversity to America’s largest companies.

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Jerry Bowyer: “Davos Man” and the Rest of Us

Every year, the international elite gather at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The conservative political scientist Samuel Huntington, who accurately warned us about the coming “clash of civilizations,” coined a phrase to describe the elites who populate these meetings: “Davos Man.”

Davos Man thinks of himself as free from the ties that hold the rest of us down—free from family, church, synagogue, community and nation. Instead, he’s a “global citizen” mouthing abstractions like ‘progress,’ ‘sustainability’ and ‘globalism.’ Davos Man views nations as at least irrelevant or even an evil threat to the march of “progress.”

In other words, all the things that give the rest of us roots are exactly the things that Davos Man has tried to sever himself from.

That’s why—in every corner of the world—we see such a revolt against Davos Man and his feckless attempts to plan mankind’s future.

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Jerry Bowyer: Economic Numbers Look Solid

Despite the ever-present media hysteria, it’s become clear that on the issue that really matters, Trump finished 2019 strong. I’m speaking, of course, about the economy. 2019 started with some economic turmoil and uncertainty. The trade war with China created a stock market whiplash and business anxiety.

But the data shows things have finally turned around. Economic confidence has been rising for months. 52 percent of investors approve of Trump’s handling of the economy, compared to just 32 percent who do not approve.

It’s no wonder that stocks have been hitting record highs. After the tax reform bill, the fundamentals of the economy were strong, and market performance reflected that.

That is, until the trade war killed Trump’s would-be boom in the cradle. Now that Trump is again on solid footing, he could be well on his way to victory in 2020 … as long as he steers clear of another trade war.

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Jerry Bowyer: Paul Volcker and the Lessons of Conservatism

Paul Volcker—the legendary Federal Reserve chair—died early this month on December 8. Volcker fought to restore discipline to monetary policy after the easy money binge of the 70s and the resulting economic stagflation. Left-wing policies led to out-of-control inflation. Volcker made the tough choices—tightening money supply and killing inflation.

This came at the cost of deep economic pain, but Ronald Reagan did not pressure Volcker, focusing instead on tax cuts, persuading the nation to give the policy a chance to work.

Despite the constant economic and political pressure to turn the morphine drip back on, Volcker stayed the course—and annual inflation went from 15 percent all the way down to under 3 percent.

The lesson today is that easy money is not the answer to a flagging economy. Conservatives should take the lesson of Paul Volcker and stick with our principles.

Even when it’s tough.

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Jerry Bowyer: A Lesson for Democrats

The news coming out of the election in the U.K. is huge.

The question in our country is simple: Are the Democrats paying attention?

Jeremy Corbyn, the radical leader of Britain’s Labour Party, just led his party to its greatest defeat in nearly 100 years. He ran on a platform of complete, unrestrained left-wing insanity.

British politics tends to be a few years ahead of American politics. Thatcher preceded Reagan, Blair preceded Bush and Boris Johnson preceded Trump.

So Democrats should be listening. As it turns out, completely unmitigated left-wing insanity isn’t an enticing deal for coal miners. The industrial labor class is not likely to vote for candidates promising de-industrialization and massive tax hikes to pay for free college.

If the Democratic leadership wants to win, they should hit the brakes, and cut out AOC and her Corbynista pals. The alternative is political irrelevance.

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