Tag Archives: Jerry Bowyer

Jerry Bowyer: Buttigieg: Bad Theology, Bad Economics

Recently, Democrat presidential candidate, Pete Buttigieg, decided to try his hand at Bible application. He argued that the federal government should prohibit any wage lower than $15/hour.

And he quoted the book of Proverbs: “Whoever oppresses the poor taunts their maker.”

When it comes to failure, that’s what we call a two-fer: It was both bad theology and bad economics.

First, bad theology: The Bible is a very long book and it does not specify a specific wage level, ever. The New Testament parable of the workers seems to argue in favor of mutually agreed upon wages, not mandated wages.

And then we have Mayor Pete’s bad economics: There is no doubt that a $15/hr. minimum wage would create a spike in unemployment, and the hardest hit would be the children of the working class and the poor.

Let’s hope the nation is not fooled by either bad economics or bad theology.

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Jerry Bowyer: Amazon Moves in a Chilling Direction

Amazon recently announced that it will no longer sell books by Dr. Joseph Nicolosi and others which help people deal with unwanted same-sex attraction.

With this, we’ve crossed a new boundary in the no-longer latent authoritarianism of the sexual revolution. In Judaism and Christianity, your nature is defined by God. In ancient Greek thought, it was defined by nature. Our modern on-going sexual revolution threw all of that aside and said that you define yourself, your will decides your identity.

But now even that restraint is being thrown off, and a one-way door is erected in its place. If you want to self-identify as gay, you can, and help is available. But if you want to self-identify as straight, the help window is slammed shut.

Amazon is moving in a chilling direction: from online book seller to online book censor.

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Jerry Bowyer: A New Voice at the Fed

With economic commentator Steve Moore out of the running for Fed, President Trump has turned to another option, announcing his intent to appoint economist Judy Shelton.

Dr. Shelton is a superb choice.

Years ago, Shelton was one of the very few analysts to predict the fall of the Soviet Union long before it happened. Her conservative commitments are rock solid, having directed the Sound Money Project at the Atlas Foundation. Just last year she was successful in getting Senate confirmation as the U.S. director of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, so she’s already been thoroughly vetted—and would likely prevail in the confirmation process.

The stakes for the global economy have never been higher. We need a new voice at the Fed who can be a solid vote for the protection of monetary stability and who can handle herself at the table with the big boys.

Judy Shelton will do well. She should be confirmed.

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Jerry Bowyer: Concerns Over Google’s Collaborations With China

As keynote speaker at the recent National Conservatism Conference, Peter Thiel, one of silicon valley’s most successful entrepreneur/investors called upon our government to investigate whether Google has been infiltrated by Chinese intelligence.

Thiel’s case is really quite strong: Artificial intelligence is a field of technology with numerous important national security implications. Google has worked closely with Chinese companies on AI.

It is well known that Chinese companies are not truly independent of the Chinese government. Google refused to work on AI with the US Pentagon, while China is well known for using intelligence services to steal IP from foreign companies.

Richard Clark who is a career anti-terrorism official, recently told CNBC that he agrees with Thiel.

On the face of it, it certainly seems like there’s enough smoke to see if there’s fire.

We should take Thiel seriously.

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Jerry Bowyer: A Tax Change the President Should Embrace

Bloomberg News and CNBC report that the Trump administration is seriously considering a rule change which would stop the IRS from taxing investors based on phantom gains from inflation.

Let’s say you buy an investment for a hundred dollars and sell it a few years later for 105 dollars, but inflation was 5 percent. You didn’t really make any money. In real purchasing power, you just broke even.

The way the system works now, you’d have to pay taxes on that five dollars. That’s not taxing income; that’s confiscating wealth.

Larry Kudlow, now the president’s chief economic advisor has long been a champion of the idea, and it looks like the president is on board. And: It looks like the president can do this without buy-in from Congress.

We should hope the president embraces this idea and moves forward with it.

It’s good economics—and it would be good politics as well.

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Jerry Bowyer: High Stakes in the 2020 Election

The stakes in the 2020 election may be higher than many Americans recognize:

A detailed look by Townhall Finance into the causes of national financial collapse—measuring hundreds of factors against scores of nations—reveals that the most reliable path to a financial collapse occurs when a nation’s leadership class turns sharply against wealth creation.

When there’s an erosion of business freedom and property rights and when government corruption, taxes and debt increase, the probability of a financial collapse goes up 3 to 5-fold.

Why should we care about how other nations have collapsed? Because large sections of today’s Democratic party are openly embracing exactly those kinds of policies.

The 2020 election is not just about the difference between a 2 percent growth rate and 4 percent growth rate.

It might be about continued growth vs. something which would make the great recession pale in comparison.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Crippling Load of Student Debt

Well, we just found out that student debt is at an all-time high. It’s just a whisker below 1.6 trillion dollars. Yes, trillion, with a “t.”

But it’s all worth it, right? Our young people need education. Not. So. Fast.

A new study shows the average freshly-minted college grad makes almost $11,000 less annually than he or she expected—and it’s true over a wide range of majors.

What gave these young people such unrealistic expectations? One factor is easy to recognize: Our serial exaggeration of the benefits expected from a degree.

Making it worse: Tuition has soared—faster than almost any other expense category in our economy. Recruiters and marketers have in turn hyped the value of their institutions and their degrees.

It’s time to scrap the myth that all young people should go to college, and that every school and every major is worth the price.

The debt load is simply crippling.

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