Tag Archives: Jerry Bowyer

Bowyer: A Turning of the Tide in the Fight Against Coronavirus


We just passed the Passover and Easter Holiday weekends and I noticed something very interesting in the data published by the University of Washington.

It looks like the U.S. death rate from coronavirus peaked on April 10th, that is Passover and Good Friday. That day 2,077 people died, more than any other day before, and from there, daily death tolls look to be retreating.

Providence? Coincidence? You be the judge. But it certainly is poignant and spiritually powerful. Passover was the moment of peak death during the plagues on Egypt when Jews stayed at home together worshiping while the angel of death passed through the land. Good Friday was the peak death moment of human history, the hour of darkness before the turning of Easter and the defeating of death in the resurrection.

What an appropriate time for death to be on the retreat in our current struggle.

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Bowyer: A Smart Response to China


The evidence that China covered up the early days of the novel coronavirus that has now left the world in great danger is overwhelming.

China has suffered a well-deserved loss of “soft power” and goodwill here in the US.

Most of us are now awake to the evils of this regime. But—as we respond—we need to be smart about it.

We don’t need to be concerned about cheap toys and consumer electronics.

We need to get hyper-focused on genuinely strategic industries—especially high tech and biotech/pharma. The way to stop the rise of China is to put maximum legal pressure on U.S. tech executives who look the other way while China steals the military technologies of the future: AI, quantum computing, 5g networks and advanced biotechnology.

We need to protect the intellectual property that drives the rise and fall of great powers, the cutting edge of technology.

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Bowyer: Corona Virus and the Resumption of Economic Activity


A debate is raging among conservatives over our response to the coronavirus. On one hand you hear the point that the cure is going to be worse than the disease. On the other, we hear no price is too high to protect life.

One side is talking about thriving; the other, about surviving.

Of course, the sanctity of life is first, but this is a false choice. We can protect life without shutting down our entire economy.

How?

By making some commonsense distinctions based on risk and reward.

Think of a mosh pit at a night club … high risk, low reward. Our GDP gain almost nothing from it, but the virus gains a lot.

On the other hand, think about road or bridge construction. Lots of economic punch, low contagion risk.

President Trump should look in this direction. He should extend the principle of high and low risk reward zones to the broader economy as well.

I’m Jerry Bowyer.

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Jerry Bowyer: China and the Coronavirus

Amidst the chaos surrounding the coronavirus, it’s worth asking how it got to the point of our now global pandemic. We should not overlook or quickly move past China’s authoritarian, messianic government.

Remember—as the Wall Street Journal reported—one of the very first doctors to discover the outbreak was accused of “spreading rumors.” Another was forced to write a letter apologizing for the “negative impact” his warning had.

The Chinese government is exceptionally harsh on anyone that questions the benevolence and competence of the Communist Party.

That’s how the Chinese cult of personality works. That’s why they persecute the Church.

What kind of country would punish doctors for trying to prevent a plague? The kind that has replaced God with the state.

I’m not pre-occupied with calling it the Chinese coronavirus or the Wuhan virus. But there is no doubt that the Chinese government does bear unique culpability.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Economy and the Coronavirus

While we all wait to see the long-term economic impact of the coronavirus, it worth a moment to look at the economic data before the virus.

By practically every measure, the economy in January and February was not only solid, but trending upwards. Trade war uncertainty was off the radar screen and job creation was well over a quarter-million per month.

House purchases were also trending up well.

Whatever economic problems this virus brings, it will be that natural disaster’s fault and not the fault of the policy mix.

Once we get past the anxiety about coronavirus, we’re likely to see a sharp and strong recovery.

The Trump administration has proposed temporary payroll tax cuts—an idea that should happen sooner rather than later, allowing plenty of time for people to feel the recovery before they go to the polls in November.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Real Point in Diversity

The point of “diversity” in the marketplace should be for people with different points of view contribute different things to the business.

But ideologues today typically use diversity as little more than a code-word for identity politics. They don’t care about genuine diversity—diversity that would include different points of view, different worldviews. In truth: They really just want progressives from various identity groups.

According to a new study by the Religious Freedom and Business Foundation, this thinking is now dominant in the corporate world. Among Fortune 100 companies, “protected categories” such as race and gender were emphasized by corporations over religion by a factor of 34 to 1.

Corporations love to talk about “diversity” and “inclusivity”—but their concern is really only skin deep.

It’s time to go deeper and add religious and viewpoint diversity to America’s largest companies.

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Jerry Bowyer: “Davos Man” and the Rest of Us

Every year, the international elite gather at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. The conservative political scientist Samuel Huntington, who accurately warned us about the coming “clash of civilizations,” coined a phrase to describe the elites who populate these meetings: “Davos Man.”

Davos Man thinks of himself as free from the ties that hold the rest of us down—free from family, church, synagogue, community and nation. Instead, he’s a “global citizen” mouthing abstractions like ‘progress,’ ‘sustainability’ and ‘globalism.’ Davos Man views nations as at least irrelevant or even an evil threat to the march of “progress.”

In other words, all the things that give the rest of us roots are exactly the things that Davos Man has tried to sever himself from.

That’s why—in every corner of the world—we see such a revolt against Davos Man and his feckless attempts to plan mankind’s future.

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