Tag Archives: Lanhee Chen

Lanhee Chen: A Potential of Breakthrough on North Korea

President Trump shocked the world when he agreed to meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.  While there’s reason to be skeptical of Kim’s motives and tactics, we should all acknowledge that the President has managed to secure a major diplomatic breakthrough in the crisis.

Now comes the hard work of making the meeting a productive one. North Korea has long dangled the prospect of disarmament in return for various concessions from America and its allies. Never before has the rogue regime been willing to keep to its promises, or to truly negotiate in good faith.  It’s possible the North Koreans are simply using the meeting as a ploy—an opportunity to make “asks” that will be impossible for American negotiators to agree to.

President Trump deserves credit for getting us to this point. But it’s important that he remains vigilant as we approach the murky waters ahead.

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Lanhee Chen: Obamacare in the Courts (Again)

Over twenty states filed a lawsuit last week targeted squarely at the heart of Obamacare. The battle is being led by the Attorney General of Texas, Ken Paxton. He argues that because Congress—in the tax reform bill passed into law late last year—effectively ended Obamacare’s requirement that people buy health insurance, the rest of the law cannot stand.

The lawsuit poses no immediate threat to Obamacare.  But if it makes its way to the Supreme Court—as four other cases on the law already have—the law could be in jeopardy, especially if one of the liberal justices on the Court steps aside soon and President Trump gets the opportunity to name a replacement.

This all reminds us of just how unpopular Obamacare continues to be.

If and until the courts step in, it’s still up to Congress and the Trump Administration to deal a decisive blow to Obamacare.

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Lanhee Chen: A Spending Problem


President Trump earned significant praise for his first State of the Union Address—and for good reason. It presented an affirmative vision for what unified Republican governance can accomplish. It also laid out policy priorities to keep the homeland secure and strengthen our economy. One thing that was missing, however, was any mention of our growing deficits and national debt. Washington is spending more money than it has and more than it should—and lawmakers from both parties seem perfectly content to continue on the path we’re on. This spending requires us to borrow money from foreign adversaries, hurts our economy’s ability to grow and leaves our kids and grandkids with the bill.


A change in course is desperately needed. Indeed, reining in spending is never politically easy. That’s why it will take a leader willing to buck trends and attack the special interests—and perhaps even some in his own party—to get the job done.


Here’s to hoping that Donald Trump can be that leader.

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Lanhee Chen: Significant Accomplishments For GOP And Trump In 2017

Tax Reform

It’s been an eventful year in American politics, but don’t let the hype distract from the reality.

It’s also been a year of significant accomplishments for the Republican Congress and, yes, President Donald Trump.

Congress passed significant legislation to cut taxes for many middle-class taxpayers, make our economy more competitive, and set the groundwork for long-term gains in wages, job creation and economic growth. The tax cut bill also dealt a big blow to Obamacare, by neutering the law’s unpopular individual mandate.

President Trump has worked with congressional Republicans to cut red tape and the size of the bureaucratic state. He’s also appointed conservative judges, including Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch, who will interpret the Constitution with deference to what’s actually in it—not what they think should be in it.

With the New Year comes yet another election and more challenges for lawmakers on Capitol Hill and President Trump. But let’s take a moment as 2017 draws to a close to acknowledge that much good work has been done and to give credit where it’s due.

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Lanhee Chen: Congress Should Give Opportunity To The Laboratories Of Democracy

Tax Reform

A consensus is emerging on Capitol Hill about the need to fund Obamacare’s cost-sharing subsidies, which help working-class Americans buy health insurance. The question is what fundamental reforms conservatives should get in return.

In my view, they should focus on giving states greater flexibility to design their own health reforms. There’s actually a part of Obamacare that allows states to receive federal money in a lump sum and to waive or revise many of Obamacare’s most noteworthy provisions, including its mandates, the structure and administration of subsidies provided by it and covered benefits . Conservatives should focus on making it easier for states to qualify for these waivers, so we can move away from the one-size-fits-all system that Obamacare created.

We are on the cusp of a rare health care bipartisan agreement. Still, conservatives will (and should) insist on fundamental changes to Obamacare as part of the deal. In so doing, they should aim for an approach that will truly give more states the opportunity to become what Justice Louis Brandeis once called “the laboratories of democracy.”

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Lanhee Chen: The Long-Running Russia Disinformation Campaign

Tax Reform

This past week, executives from Facebook, Twitter, and Google testified before Congress about Russian meddling in the 2016 election.

For well over a decade, the Russians have spread disinformation and sought to influence the outcome of elections throughout Europe and elsewhere.

The obvious question is, “Why hasn’t more been done to respond to this threat?” Although multiple administrations bear the blame for this failure, it was the Obama administration that, for years, consistently underestimated the threat from Russia.

For example, Politico reported that, in 2014, President Obama’s national security team received reports warning about Russia’s capacity, history, and interest in disrupting political systems in Europe. It should have been clear that those capabilities could be used to attack the United States. But nothing was done.

Russian efforts to undermine American democracy did not end with the 2016 election. Put simply, this is one of the reasons why they continue to represent a serious threat to our national security. Now is the time to act quickly and decisively to ensure the integrity of our democratic system.

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Salem Media at the White House As Tax Reform Effort Begins

White House, Obamacare, shooting, Paris Climate Agreement

Townhall Review – September 21, 2017
Mike Gallagher and Hugh Hewitt are invited to the White House to interview President Trump and Vice President Pence. President Trump discusses healthcare and media bias, while VP Pence discusses the administration’s focus on tax cuts and foreign relations. Sally Pipes, president of the Pacific Research Institute, joins Larry Elder to talk about Trump’s executive order on healthcare. Grover Norquist, founder and President of Americans for Tax Reform, sits in with Dan Proft to share insights on President Trump’s tax reform. Hugh Hewitt invites Israel’s Ambassador to the U.S, Ron Dermer, on to discuss the conflict between the Kurdish and Iraqi forces in Kirkuk. Dennis Prager looks at a piece from author and playwright Andrew Klavan in light of the Harvey Weinstein scandal. Lanhee Chen, of the Hoover Institute, and Cory Garner, chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, discuss the future of healthcare.

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