Tag Archives: legislation

Hugh Hewitt: Phase Four Legislation: What Should Be in It?

Congress is going to pass some sort of “Phase Four” relief package—simply because it must. It will likely be the most significant piece of spending legislation in my adult life.

What should be in it?

We absolutely must rebuild our defense industrial base. A strong defense will be essential for our response to the government whose negligence visited this pandemic on the world: the Chinese Communist Party.

Any subsequent help to the private sector cannot be advanced without liability protection. Federal law must preempt all state tort law concerning liability for coronavirus-related claims of negligence and intentional injury.

The collision with China has also put a new focus on Big Tech. These companies need to be pressed to side forthrightly and finally with the American republic that created the free minds and free markets that gave them birth.

“Phase Four” is shaping up to be the “law of a legislative lifetime.”

There’s no time to spare.

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Albert Mohler: Switzerland Criminalizing Public Expressions of Christian Orthodoxy?

The news coming out of Switzerland should have our attention—where 63 percent of voters decided to criminalize public homophobia.

What are we looking at is a species of hate speech legislation—a law criminalizing certain speech. In an intellectually dishonest move, the Swiss government authorities assured voters that even though this is a curtailment of the freedom of speech, it is not actually a curtailment of free speech.

Yes: It’s a contradictory argument, but it also points to the very heart of the problem with hate speech legislation.

In fact: On the other side of this vast sexual and moral revolution, a traditional defense of biblical Christianity could well now be defined as a criminal act in Switzerland.

Any exemptions we see will not long last because of the logic of this legislation—and that is to declare that anything short of the total public comprehensive embrace of the LGBTQ movement—is a form of hatred.

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Lanhee Chen: Democrats Push Single Payer

Democrats introduced single-payer health care legislation last week that—if passed—would move every American into a single, government-run insurance program, within two years. The bill already has over 100 co-sponsors in the U.S. House, and many of the Democratic Party’s candidates for president in 2020 are sure to endorse it too.

But, as with other plans to bring socialized medicine to all Americans, this single-payer legislation has plenty of drawbacks.

Like your current coverage? Say goodbye to it. Value your relationship with your doctor? Time to find a new one. Think health care spending in the U.S. is high now? Wait until you see what happens if the Democrats’ proposal actually becomes law.

One more thing: The Democrats have no explanation for how the system would be paid for.

But, don’t worry. I’m sure they’ll find the estimated $30 trillion somewhere.

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Albert Mohler: A Revealing Week in the U.S. Senate

On Tuesday this week, the U.S. Senate failed to pass legislation that would protect the lives of children born alive, that would have prevented and made illegal infanticide after a botched abortion. It should be inconceivable that such an event would happen in the United States Senate, but it did happen.

It was both tragic and telling.

A bare majority—53 senators—voted in favor of the legislation, but 44 opposed it. Given the filibuster rules in the Senate, 60 votes were needed for the measure to proceed to the Senate floor for a full vote.

From time to time legislation—by virtue of the fact that it passes or fails to pass—offers something of a diagnostic test of the moral condition of the United States, of its people and its culture. Something like a moral MRI or CAT scan. What the scan revealed this week is chilling: What you see is the culture of death staring back at us ominously.

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Albert Mohler: The Abortion Rights Lobby Revealed

The horrible reality of late-term abortion points to the horrible reality of abortion, period. The abortion-related legislation in the news in recent weeks reveals a progression in pro-abortion thinking: Late-term abortion is becoming a basic principle of the pro-abortion movement.

From the State of New York, to Rhode Island, Virginia and now Illinois, we are seeing legislation put forward that reveals the truth about abortion—the mask taken off, as it were.

We’re seeing the determination that abortion be available to any woman at any time for any reason or for no reason—even to the point that the advocates of abortion, who had basically tried to indicate that they understood third-trimester abortions to be different, now they’re saying they’re not different at all.

And we also have to acknowledge this follows their own deadly logic.

Either life is sacred and worth protecting … or it’s not.

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David Davenport: Previewing Trump’s First State of the Union Speech

Compromise

A president’s first state of the union message is an important occasion. But in our era of political theater, there is some danger that this year the sideshow will overshadow the main attraction.

Several Democratic members of Congress say they will boycott the event.  One Congresswoman is encouraging females who do attend to dress in black.

Despite the political challenges, “it’s the economy, stupid.”  If Trump makes this primarily an economic address, he can succeed.  Think about it:  unemployment is down, jobs are up and the stock market is on fire. His big piece of legislation, the tax bill, is projected to lead to even more economic growth. The president has problems elsewhere, but so far so good on the economy and that should be his message.

The Constitution does not actually require this kind of televised state of the union address, though tradition does.  It’s always possible that a nontraditional president like Trump might surprise us and do something completely different.

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Hugh Hewitt: The White House West Wing (Staff) Renovation

U.S. Senate

The exit of Stephen K. Bannon completes a restructuring of the West Wing that began almost as soon as the president took office and is now apparently complete. Like the physical renovation of the West Wing, it was noisy, not very attractive … but it was necessary.

What is needed now are successes in cooperation with Congress—beyond confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, the Veterans Affairs reform bill, and the 14 Congressional Review Act laws that were all enormously significant—but those were low-profile victories, and it seemed like Gorsuch was half a year ago.

What is needed above all is either a tax bill or resurrection of the health-care fix. Slashing the corporate tax rate is probably the easiest (and perhaps most economically significant) bit of legislation to accomplish—but so too must arrive the repeal of the Budget Control Act, which has devastated national security via the “sequester” and hamstrung a key Trump promise, that of a 355-ship Navy.

The staffing reset—along with a rhetorical reset from President Trump himself begun last week—can help get things moving.

 

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