Tag Archives: legislation

Lanhee Chen: Democrats Push Single Payer

Democrats introduced single-payer health care legislation last week that—if passed—would move every American into a single, government-run insurance program, within two years. The bill already has over 100 co-sponsors in the U.S. House, and many of the Democratic Party’s candidates for president in 2020 are sure to endorse it too.

But, as with other plans to bring socialized medicine to all Americans, this single-payer legislation has plenty of drawbacks.

Like your current coverage? Say goodbye to it. Value your relationship with your doctor? Time to find a new one. Think health care spending in the U.S. is high now? Wait until you see what happens if the Democrats’ proposal actually becomes law.

One more thing: The Democrats have no explanation for how the system would be paid for.

But, don’t worry. I’m sure they’ll find the estimated $30 trillion somewhere.

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Albert Mohler: A Revealing Week in the U.S. Senate

On Tuesday this week, the U.S. Senate failed to pass legislation that would protect the lives of children born alive, that would have prevented and made illegal infanticide after a botched abortion. It should be inconceivable that such an event would happen in the United States Senate, but it did happen.

It was both tragic and telling.

A bare majority—53 senators—voted in favor of the legislation, but 44 opposed it. Given the filibuster rules in the Senate, 60 votes were needed for the measure to proceed to the Senate floor for a full vote.

From time to time legislation—by virtue of the fact that it passes or fails to pass—offers something of a diagnostic test of the moral condition of the United States, of its people and its culture. Something like a moral MRI or CAT scan. What the scan revealed this week is chilling: What you see is the culture of death staring back at us ominously.

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Albert Mohler: The Abortion Rights Lobby Revealed

The horrible reality of late-term abortion points to the horrible reality of abortion, period. The abortion-related legislation in the news in recent weeks reveals a progression in pro-abortion thinking: Late-term abortion is becoming a basic principle of the pro-abortion movement.

From the State of New York, to Rhode Island, Virginia and now Illinois, we are seeing legislation put forward that reveals the truth about abortion—the mask taken off, as it were.

We’re seeing the determination that abortion be available to any woman at any time for any reason or for no reason—even to the point that the advocates of abortion, who had basically tried to indicate that they understood third-trimester abortions to be different, now they’re saying they’re not different at all.

And we also have to acknowledge this follows their own deadly logic.

Either life is sacred and worth protecting … or it’s not.

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David Davenport: Previewing Trump’s First State of the Union Speech

Compromise

A president’s first state of the union message is an important occasion. But in our era of political theater, there is some danger that this year the sideshow will overshadow the main attraction.

Several Democratic members of Congress say they will boycott the event.  One Congresswoman is encouraging females who do attend to dress in black.

Despite the political challenges, “it’s the economy, stupid.”  If Trump makes this primarily an economic address, he can succeed.  Think about it:  unemployment is down, jobs are up and the stock market is on fire. His big piece of legislation, the tax bill, is projected to lead to even more economic growth. The president has problems elsewhere, but so far so good on the economy and that should be his message.

The Constitution does not actually require this kind of televised state of the union address, though tradition does.  It’s always possible that a nontraditional president like Trump might surprise us and do something completely different.

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Hugh Hewitt: The White House West Wing (Staff) Renovation

U.S. Senate

The exit of Stephen K. Bannon completes a restructuring of the West Wing that began almost as soon as the president took office and is now apparently complete. Like the physical renovation of the West Wing, it was noisy, not very attractive … but it was necessary.

What is needed now are successes in cooperation with Congress—beyond confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, the Veterans Affairs reform bill, and the 14 Congressional Review Act laws that were all enormously significant—but those were low-profile victories, and it seemed like Gorsuch was half a year ago.

What is needed above all is either a tax bill or resurrection of the health-care fix. Slashing the corporate tax rate is probably the easiest (and perhaps most economically significant) bit of legislation to accomplish—but so too must arrive the repeal of the Budget Control Act, which has devastated national security via the “sequester” and hamstrung a key Trump promise, that of a 355-ship Navy.

The staffing reset—along with a rhetorical reset from President Trump himself begun last week—can help get things moving.

 

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Michael Medved: Different Roles Divide the Party

Opioid

As Republicans on Capitol Hill struggle to make progress on healthcare and tax reform, the loudest voices in conservative media rip the GOP’s Congressional leadership for their willingness to compromise on drafting legislation.

Actually, Republicans in the House and Senate are doing what they need to do to succeed at their jobs, while conservative commentators in talk radio and syndicated columns do what brings success in their very different roles. Congressional conservatives can achieve nothing without support from moderate Republicans and, ideally, some Democrats, but conservative talkers can maintain ratings dominance by appealing solely to hard-core true believers who make up at most 10 percent of the available audience.

The only way to repair the rift in Republican ranks is for conservative media to alter their strident approach and broaden their base. That process might bring even larger audiences, while helping Congressional colleagues to build the larger coalitions that Constitutional checks and balances require.

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Michael Medved: Public Opinion and Obamacare

Opioid

In 2010, the health insurance legislation known as “Obamacare” was overwhelmingly unpopular. But Democrats in the White House and Congress pushed it through anyway, and then paid a severe price in the next elections. Today, the health care package known as “Trumpcare” is similarly unpopular, but the Republicans seem determined to pass legislation this summer, even at the risk of serious losses of their own in 2018 Congressional elections.

Does this mean the electorate is confused?—hating Obamacare, and then hating the most serious attempt to repeal and replace it? Actually, public reactions are sensible and consistent—what Americans hate is the whole idea of the federal government making sweeping, bureaucratic decisions, on something as personal and important as medical insurance.

If the GOP made clear that their proposals provide individuals with more choices, and give the states more discretion to shape their own policies, their reforms would win much broader popular support.

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