Tag Archives: liberty

Michael Medved: Pushing Guilt Over Gratitude on America’s Past

With much fanfare, the New York Times launched “The 1619 Project,” commemorating the 400th anniversary of the arrival of the first 20 enslaved Africans in Jamestown colony.

The Times misleadingly announced: “Though America did not even exist yet, their arrival marked its foundation, the beginning of the system of slavery on which the country was built.”

This sentence constitutes a dangerous lie, because the new colony in Virginia hardly marked the beginning of the system of slavery but rather the continuation of an ancient, universal system that flourished in some form, everywhere, in 1619.

What made America unique wasn’t slavery, but the freedom and opportunity offered to most of the New World arrivals, resulting—within 150 years—in higher living standards, and more widespread liberty, than anywhere on earth.

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Lanhee Chen: Standing for Liberty in Hong Kong

The free world recently mourned the 30th anniversary of China’s brutal crackdown on pro-democracy protestors in Tiananmen Square.

Although the dreams of a freer, more open China were crushed in June 1989, today in Hong Kong the voices of freedom are again speaking out against tyranny.

Hong Kong’s civil liberties and autonomy are at risk.

Youth protestors originally took to the streets to oppose legislation that would allow for extradition of criminal suspects to mainland China. Although the proposed law has been shelved, the protestors–numbering about two million at one point–continue to speak out against the government in Beijing and in favor of democracy and the preservation of liberty in Hong Kong.

There’s a temptation to ignore the cries for freedom, half a world away. But we should always stand with those who seek liberty and democracy, wherever that might be.

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Albert Mohler: One Family’s Sacrifice for Liberty


The New York Times recently published a story entitled “Wreck of the Juneau Is Found.” It’s about the discovery of the U.S. Navy cruiser Juneau that was blasted apart by a Japanese torpedo in 1942.

Even in the context of the millions and millions of casualties of World War II on all sides, the story Juneau resonates in a special way in the American memory, a memory of indebtedness to one family. One family that lost not one, not two, not three, not four but five sons on one day on one ship!

75 years later, the Juneau’s wreckage has been discovered but the American people’s moral debt remains: a moral debt to all those who have given their lives and have given their family members to the cause of defending liberty.

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Albert Mohler: The Growing Willingness To Sacrifice Religious Liberty

Billy Graham

The nation of Australia recently voted by a wide margin to legalize same-sex marriage.

The question turns swiftly now to the issue of religious liberty. Already, the major bill is inadequate when it comes to protecting religious freedom.

The Attorney General of Australia, noting this fact, has suggested that the bill must “make it clear that nothing in the bill makes it unlawful for people to hold and to express the views of their own religion on the subject of marriage.” The sad fact is that the Attorney General even had to state this.

Jeremy Sammut, writing in the Australian version of the Spectator, got it exactly right when he wrote, “Any marriage equality law that does not include comprehensives protections for religious freedom will pave the way for anti-discrimination lawsuits that will single out and force Christians to act against their beliefs.”

We are now seeing that religious liberty is far too quickly sacrificed by those whose chief priority very clearly is this sexual revolution.

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Jerry Bowyer: America Is Indebted To Martin Luther

Jordan Peterson

500 years ago Martin Luther’s started a debate by nailing a document with 95 theological assertions to the door of the Wittenberg Cathedral, triggering the Reformation. No matter which side of that theological debate you’re on, you should be grateful for the ultimate effects of this action on Western liberty and prosperity.

Luther took existing strands of thought and weaved them together into a powerfully influential Biblical argument for freedom of conscience that ultimately laid the groundwork for our American 1st Amendment.

Many of these 95 assertions concerned economic exploitation. And Luther’s doctrine of the Priesthood of all believers helped to create a culture which honors hard work and innovation.

In the lands influenced by the Reformation, living standards have increased 100 fold; ordinary people who used to routinely die in their 30s, now often live into their 80s, and child mortality has gone from tragically common to increasingly rare.

Luther wasn’t perfect, but the good that he preached, is needed now as much as it was then.

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Hugh Hewitt: Winning In Washington

U.S. Senate

What does it mean to “win” in Washington? I’ve long described “progress” as the ongoing, incremental expansion of liberty and literacy in a growing number stable regimes in or aligned with the West. And by that definition, much of the agenda of President Trump’s administration could well be described as “winning.”

Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price and EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt have become the domestic policy stars of the Trump administration, joining Defense Secretary Mattis, Homeland Security Secretary Kelly and CIA Director Pompeo as foreign policy counterparts off to successful starts. Each of the five brought to the task discipline and passion to lead their agencies.

The key, however, is that all five have sought and received buy-ins from the president and Vice President Pence on their policy directions and priorities—and, even more, that they pursue and defend their missions with little or no reference to the raging battle between the West Wing and the media elites.

Any assessment of the Trump administration ought to include a clear-eyed evaluation of where they are in fact wining.

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David Davenport: The Future Of Freedom

Compromise

A new survey by the Fund for American Studies reminds us that millennials do not understand economics. The same group that does not know basic civics—such as who their senator is or whether Judge Judy is on the Supreme Court—also doesn’t get how free markets work.

While 60% of millennials said they would choose liberty over security, in turn 54% want more government, not less. A majority of even Republicans and conservatives believe government should regulate oil and drug company prices, and place tariffs on goods coming from overseas.

This survey is described as a “freedom index” but millennials really favor more government regulation. I suppose it’s no surprise that young people who have grown up knowing nothing but big government fail to see the connection between more government regulation and less freedom.

Young people who value freedom in their personal and social lives need to understand that political and economic freedoms are necessary to sustain that.

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