Tag Archives: life expectancy

Michael Medved: The Alarming Truth About Life Expectancy

The New York Times recently reported on alarming statistics on life expectancy. “For the first time in modern history, gains have stalled,” according to the report. “Alcohol and drug abuse, poor diet, obesity, smoking, and a lack of exercise have taken their toll … Older people are dying prematurely, their conditions worsened by isolation and depression.”

It’s a bleak portrait, but it’s not about America: the Times report focused on the United Kingdom, long-celebrated by the left for its National Health Service and other welfare state programs. Of course, in America we have identical problems of substance abuse, isolation and deaths of despair, but the situation in Great Britain reveals how socialized medicine and big government don’t offer simple solutions.

In most Western societies, the breakdown of family, retreat of religion and collapse of community, damage both the quality and length of our lives, regardless of government policies.

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Jerry Bowyer: America Is Indebted To Martin Luther

Jordan Peterson

500 years ago Martin Luther’s started a debate by nailing a document with 95 theological assertions to the door of the Wittenberg Cathedral, triggering the Reformation. No matter which side of that theological debate you’re on, you should be grateful for the ultimate effects of this action on Western liberty and prosperity.

Luther took existing strands of thought and weaved them together into a powerfully influential Biblical argument for freedom of conscience that ultimately laid the groundwork for our American 1st Amendment.

Many of these 95 assertions concerned economic exploitation. And Luther’s doctrine of the Priesthood of all believers helped to create a culture which honors hard work and innovation.

In the lands influenced by the Reformation, living standards have increased 100 fold; ordinary people who used to routinely die in their 30s, now often live into their 80s, and child mortality has gone from tragically common to increasingly rare.

Luther wasn’t perfect, but the good that he preached, is needed now as much as it was then.

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