Tag Archives: michael medved

Michael Medved: Lessons from the College Cheating Scandal

The cheating scandal in college admissions should force immediate changes at leading universities. For instance, corrupt parents bribed coaches and created false records for their kids, who pretended to be athletic stars in water polo, rowing or sailing.

But why reserve slots even for children who really excel in these sports? How does the presence of better student golfers, for instance, raise the quality of a major college? Football and basketball can make big money for the university, but minor sports cost money that only inflates tuition.

Moreover, kids who are accomplished in sailing, golf, or tennis, most likely come from wealthy backgrounds. Giving them preferences in admissions is like affirmative action for rich kids.

In addition to grades and test scores, it’s appropriate to count volunteerism, or artistic ability, or community leadership. But to tilt toward participants in minor sports shows a problem of misplaced priorities.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Democratic Push for Late-Term Abortion is Repulsive and Suicidal

Democrats across the country seem insanely determined to pursue a repulsive political strategy to expand access to late-term abortions, despite overwhelming opposition to the gruesome practice.

In Virginia, for instance, the law already allows women to get-late term abortions if giving birth would “result in the death of the woman or substantially and irreparably impair the mental or physical health of the woman.”

The proposed new law would remove the words “substantially and irreparably” and allow abortion with the certification of a single doctor, not three as currently required- meaning one doctor, citing concerns for his patient’s mental health, could abort the baby at the very moment of birth.

This is extreme, radical and it’s outrageous—and it’s guaranteed to unite Republicans in opposition and damage Democratic prospects for 2020 and beyond.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Did a Double Standard Protect Northam?

Regarding the hateful image connected to Governor Ralph Northam, Virginia Democrat, it doesn’t matter whether he’s the figure in blackface, the one in Klan costume, or neither one of them.

He IS the one who chose to place that photograph on his personal page in his medical school yearbook. Among just four photos he used to define his personality, he chose one that recycles racist stereotypes while trivializing murderous violence.

In Northam’s own lifetime, the Klan had committed bombings and shootings of civil rights workers throughout the South. Conservative Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh was taken to task for stupid references to beer in his high school yearbook when he was 15; but no one in press or politics ever exposed Northam for treating racist violence like a joke when he was 25.

There’s a double standard at work that needs to end.

Read More »

Michael Medved: The “News Business” Becomes the “Bad News Business”

Two destructive impulses distort media coverage of far too many major – and minor – events. And both of these instincts were on powerful display in the recent distortions involving a non-violent, Lincoln Memorial exchange between pro-life, Catholic high school boys from Covington, Kentucky and activists representing “Indigenous Peoples” and “Black Israelites.”

First, reporters tend to blame conservatives for anything that goes wrong, even when there’s scant evidence to back them up. Second, the media almost always exaggerate anything that does goes wrong.

Any problem—from the environment, to the economy, to the political system to schools and even foreign relations—automatically becomes a catastrophe. The idea is that the public will pay more attention if you can make them worried or scared: the news business becomes the bad news business, promoting an unduly pessimistic view of our country and the world.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Judge by Conduct, Not Headgear

To paraphrase Dr. King: “Judge others by the content of their character, not by the color of their …. MAGA caps.” Unfortunately, a group of pro-life Kentucky schoolboys drew savage media criticism based on their pro-Trump headgear, not their personal conduct.

The video record shows that in the face of taunts and insults, the teenagers showed admirable restraint and dignity. Internet and journalistic commentators should have learned a crucial lesson: if someone holds opinions that differ from yours, that alone doesn’t make him or her a bad person.

The kids from Covington Catholic, the “Native Elder” and Indian activists who beat drums and chanted at them, even the “Black Israelites” who hurled insults instead of rocks or bombs, all showed that vigorous expressions of First Amendment rights need not produce a meaningless melee.

Not a bad day for our badly divided country!

Read More »

Michael Medved: To Hold Power, GOP Must Win State-by-State Battles


To hold the Senate and White House in 2020’s upcoming battle royal, Republicans must focus on state-by-state results, not the ups and downs in national opinion polls. In 2018’s midterms, Republicans lost 40 House seats, 7 governorships and 22 of 33 U.S. Senate races.

In overwhelmingly conservative states like North Dakota, Indiana, and Missouri, Republican Senate candidates prevailed, as they did in one key swing state: Florida. But in other must-win states that Donald Trump carried last time—Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Arizona—Republican Senate challengers flopped.

They also lost in deep red West Virginia and Montana, while carrying Texas in just a squeaker. To retain power in the Senate and Electoral College, the GOP needs a more positive, pragmatic problem-solving approach to broaden the party’s base.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Impeachment Dreams, National Nightmares


Democratic impeachment dreams will inevitably collide with a Constitution that makes removal of a president all but impossible. With the current Senate line-up, Democrats would need to persuade 20 Republicans to join all 47 of them for the two-thirds vote to drive Trump from office.

In 232 years of Constitutional history, no US Senator—not even one—has ever voted to remove a president of his or her own party. What happened to Richard Nixon in 1974? The Watergate crisis climaxed in the midst of a midterm election campaign; a campaign in which the GOP ultimately lost 48 House seats and 5 in the Senate.

In a desperate bid to mitigate looming disaster, Senate leaders begged Nixon to resign. For the sake of his party and his country, he did so. In Trump’s case, elections are nearly two years away and, barring unforeseen, catastrophic revelations, his resignation is inconceivable.

Read More »