Tag Archives: michael medved

Michael Medved: “Black Conservative”: No Contradiction in Terms

To mainstream media, the designation “Black conservative” represents a contradiction in terms. Conventional wisdom insists African Americans must automatically identify as progressive, or even radical, to be true to their racial identity, But a bold new film explodes that patronizing assumption with passion, wit and a series of admirable examples.

Uncle Tom” features Black leaders like Allen West, Herman Cain, Robert Woodson, Candace Owens and my talk radio colleague Larry Elder—who’s also one of the film’s producers.

Without narration or an overarching storyline, the film provides insightful, sometimes intimate observations in vivid black and white, so the contemporary comments blend seamlessly with stunning historical footage.

Along with eloquent vintage photographs, these clips bring to life great figures from Frederick Douglass and Booker T. Washington to Dr. King himself. “Uncle Tom” is perfectly timed, making a much-needed contribution to the quest for justice and understanding at a moment of accusatory hysteria in race relations.

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Michael Medved: “Defund the Police” Contradicts Liberal Dreams of Gun Control

By embracing the slogan “Defund the Police,” prominent Democrats undermine one of their central arguments for stringent gun control. For decades, the left has argued that law-abiding citizens shouldn’t rely on firearms to protect their families but should count instead on police professionals to guarantee their safety.

But now progressives seek to disarm the cops at the same time they hope to disarm private citizens, ignoring the dangers posed by well-armed criminals who have no intention of surrendering their guns.

It’s already illegal for chronic lawbreakers to own guns, but who’s supposed to take those guns away if police forces are cut back? If the left is serious about reducing the presence of firearms in our big cities, then crippling police departments is exactly the wrong way to do it, pushing citizens to arm themselves, and generating a toxic new sense of insecurity.

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Michael Medved: Statues May Be Debatable; Vandalism Isn’t

Recent surveys show public opinion closely divided over local and federal decisions to remove Confederate memorials, but no one has polled reaction to violent vandals who topple monuments on their own in spurts of wanton destruction.

In Portland, Oregon, thugs tore down statues of both Washington and Jefferson, while San Francisco radicals trashed a bust of General Grant, the commander whose Civil War victories meant the end of slavery. Decent people may disagree over proper disposition of various commemorations, but there’s no defense for vicious vigilantes who assault public places and property, generally without consequences for their destruction.

Black Lives Matter, along with leaders of the left from Biden to Bernie, ought to speak out clearly and unequivocally against such rampant mobs, or else the public will spurn their other aspirations with appropriate indignation.

Rule of law, and orderly consensus must prevail in coming to terms with America’s past—and our future.

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Michael Medved: The Left’s Fanatical Substitute for Faith

In late April, hundreds of Orthodox Jews gathered for the funeral of a beloved Chassidic rabbi, but New York’s mayor deemed their rites “absolutely unacceptable” and threatened mass arrests if it happened again.

A month later, tens of thousands of angry, often violent protestors, rallied for Black Lives Matter but the same mayor encouraged them, boasting of his own daughter’s participation. Simultaneously, 1,300 medical and public health professionals who had previously advocated strict social distancing, signed a statement in support of mass demonstrations and, idiotically, called them “vital to the national public health.”

This ludicrous, illogical switch demonstrates that so-called “social justice activism” has become a substitute religion for secular progressives—with its own saints, martyrs and intolerant, unassailable creed. In this replacement faith, the holiest sacrament is public protest—not because it achieves anything practical but because it amounts to a form of self-destructive, fanatical, secular worship.

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A Disheartening Decision from the Supreme Court and Continued Unrest Across the Nation


Townhall Review – June 20, 2020, 2020

Bob Franz talks with David Cortman, The Alliance Defending Freedom, about the U.S. Supreme Court decision redefining gender discrimination.

Sebastian Gorka and Stephanie Hamill, of the Daily Caller, talk about the activist take over of a Seattle neighborhood, now called CHOP, the Capitol Hill Occupied Protest.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson discuss the Seattle autonomous zone, CHOP, with Michael Medved, who lives just a few miles from the area.

Sebastian Gorka talks with John Solomon, investigative journalist, about the “black ledger,” one of the key documents used against members of the 2016 Trump campaign.

Hugh Hewitt and Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson talk about the aftermath of the death of George Floyd.

Dennis Prager talks with British journalist Matt Ridley, author of “How Innovation Works: And Why It Flourishes in Freedom,” talk about bringing freedom back to both the UK and the U.S.

Larry Elder looks at an effort to erase history in the United Kingdom by removing statues of Winston Churchill.

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Medved: Unmasking “Shy Trump Voters”


A little noted detail in a new national poll raises questions on its report of a solid, steady Biden lead.

The Wall Street Journal/NBC News Poll also asked respondents about social distancing and 85 percent claimed they regularly wear masks outside the home, but anybody noting real-world habits of neighbors and strangers knows mask-wearing isn’t really that universal.

Yes, many respondents must be fibbing—telling pollsters what they think they want to hear. Similarly, some voters no doubt feel reluctant to inform representatives of big media companies that they’re planning to vote for the president.

Last time, the phenomenon of “shy Trump voters” contributed to notorious polling errors. That pattern may or may not repeat itself, but it’s possible that many voters again prefer to mask—you should pardon the expression—an inclination to vote for Donald Trump.

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Michael Medved: Why Most Americans Love the Police

Angry protestors want to turn public sentiment against the police, but their ugly tactics remind all sane observers how much we need the cops. Rioting, looting, arson, Molotov cocktails, graffiti and vandalism demonstrate how vulnerable all citizens would be without the courage of police officers who put their lives on the line every day.

Sure, you can find examples of bad or poorly trained cops. but they’re far more rare in police ranks than are violent, criminal elements in the ranks of the demonstrators.

In a difficult moment, time when Americans can’t decide whether to emphasize economic recovery or continued precautions against COVID-19, the nationwide rioting harms both hopes.

Literally thousands of already struggling businesses have been badly damaged, while assembling “super-spreader,” densely packed crowds will only generate new spikes in the spread of the virus.

No wonder most Americans love and value our police officers – without whom decent lives, and livable cities, could not exist.

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