Tag Archives: Minneapolis

Violent Unrest and Coronavirus Concerns as Election Day Approaches


Townhall Review – July 25, 2020

Hugh Hewitt talks with NBC Correspondent Steve Kornacki about the COVID-19 effect on the 2020 Presidential Campaign.

Sebastian Gorka and Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security Ken Cuccinelli talk about the makings of a real revolution going on today in some major American cities.

Mark Davis and Dr. (Admiral) Brett Giroir, Assistant Secretary of Health and Human Services, talk about how we are doing as a country to get ourselves free of the pandemic.

Sebastian Gorka turns to Victor Davis Hanson, Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, about the cultural revolution.

Kevin McCullough and Lanhee Chen talk about getting our kids back to school.

Steve Cortes talks with Steven Mosher, President of the Population Research Center, about China’s responsibility for the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dennis Prager and Bjorn Lomborg talk about global warming and his book, “False Alarm.”

Larry Elder looks at news coverage of local black police officers in the cities of Portland and Minneapolis.

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Owen Strachan: Police Protection is Not Privilege

A call is going out now for the “dismantling” of the Minneapolis police department. The President of the city council said this when asked about what to do in the case of a break-in:

“Yes, I mean I hear that loud and clear from a lot of my neighbors, and myself, too, and I know that that comes from a place of privilege… calling the police may mean more harm is done.”

There’s no doubt that our cities and communities need restoration, including greater peaceful engagement between police and citizens. Yet the idea that wanting protection is “privilege” is not sound. In fact, it’s absurd and won’t restore anything.

Police who act unjustly are accountable to the rule of law, and must be. But there is no need to qualify what a society without police will look like: more harm will surely be done.

May coming days bring greater safety—and meaningful restoration.

I’m Owen Strachan.

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Albert Mohler: The Preconditions for Constructive Political Change

The widespread rioting and looting we’ve witnessed in the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer highlight the need for stability and trust in the achievement of justice.

In the United States, the act of political protest has often led to constructive political change, but rioting never has. And the more widespread and the more violent the rioting, the more negative the political effects have been over time.

The United States Constitution guarantees citizens the right to a redress of grievances.

But there are preconditions that are necessary—the first is a stable order in which justice can actually take place. The second is the kind of trust, social trust, that is necessary for any effort at achieving even approximate justice.

If you take out stability, if you eliminate order, and if you erode social trust, the accomplishment of justice becomes well-nigh impossible.

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Albert Mohler: Law and Order and the Death of George Floyd

The video of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis, held down by a police officer in an arrest with his knee on the back of his neck resulted—as we now know—in his tragic death.

Commenting on the video, Art Acevedo, who is the head of the Major Cities Chiefs Association said, “I haven’t heard anybody justify this.”

The sad reality is that George Floyd is now dead.

When you look at the protests and rioting in Minneapolis, it is an ugly picture everywhere you look—and now not just in Minneapolis.

But where does this story lead?

It all comes down to the importance of the rule of law. If the rule of law breaks down, there is no rescue.

Injustice documented before our eyes cries out for justice, but justice calls out for the rule of law—in the courtroom and on the streets of America’s cities.

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Joe Biden Is His Own Worst Enemy


Townhall Review – May 30, 2020

Hugh Hewitt and Byron York, of the Washington Examiner, talk about Joe Biden’s latest gaffe that might have hurt him with a voting block that most see as solidly Democrat.

Larry Elder talks about Joe Biden’s latest slip up that some say he simply said what other Democrats have been saying for some time.

Dennis Prager talks with Eric Eggers, research director at the Government Accountability Institute, about the Democrats push for all mail-in balloting.

Sebastian Gorka and Hogan Gidley, White House Deputy Press Secretary, talk about the post-pandemic economy.

Kevin McCullough talks with David Marcus, writer for The Federalist, about New York Governor Andrew Cuomo’s heavy-handed lockdown.

Dennis Prager and investigative journalist Abigail Shrier talk about Connecticut girl track stars who are seeing their dreams crushed by boys who compete as girls.

Mike Gallagher reacts to the death of George Floyd, who died at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer.

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