Tag Archives: Mitt Romney

Lanhee Chen: A Rare Glimpse of Bipartisanship

Despite all of the partisan rancor in Congress, there is remarkable bipartisan agreement on the need to deal with the challenge of smoking and tobacco use amongst young Americans.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Senator Tim Kaine of Virginia have introduced legislation that would raise the federal minimum age to purchase tobacco—including vaping products and e-cigarettes—to 21.

Other Senators, including Republican Mitt Romney and Democrat Dick Durbin, have introduced similar legislation. It’s particularly striking that McConnell and Kaine both come from significant tobacco-producing states.

Tobacco use and vaping have reached epidemic proportions amongst America’s youth, creating a public health crisis that demands the attention of lawmakers. The fact that leaders of both parties acknowledge the need for action is a great start.

Now, it’s up to members of Congress to vote for this important change and for President Trump to sign this important legislation into law.

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Lanhee Chen: Paul Ryan One of the Conservative Movement’s Most Articulate and Thoughtful Leaders


Paul Ryan has announced that he won’t be running for reelection again this fall.

He was first elected to Congress in 1998 and during his 20 years there, has served the citizens of the First District of Wisconsin well. Even as he rose to become one of the most powerful elected leaders in the country Paul remained a humble man who is, above all, a devoted husband and father.

History will remember Paul Ryan for being one of the conservative movement’s most articulate and thoughtful leaders.  He fought for important ideas like a balanced budget, reform of our tax code and entitlement reform.

But I will remember Paul Ryan as so much more.  I had the privilege and honor to work with him when he was the GOP’s nominee for Vice President in 2012.  There is almost no one in public life whom I respect and admire more.

He will be missed.

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Michael Medved: Trump Wins as a Mainstream Conservative

Opioid

Donald Trump’s first year in office delivered an array of important achievements: confirmation of conservative judges, including Neil Gorsuch; more support for oil pipelines and oil drilling; dramatic progress against ISIS; deregulation and enhanced border security; the end of meddlesome net neutrality; the recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital; and, most importantly, sweeping tax cuts and a new pro-business approach. What’s striking about these accomplishments isn’t how extraordinary they are but how normal: how consistent with well-established Republican goals and values. It’s easy to imagine that much the same policies might have been pursued by President Trump’s primary rivals—or by Mitt Romney, the last GOP nominee.

 

The two initiatives that caused most substantial disagreement with many conventional conservatives—canceling the Trans Pacific Partnership and unilaterally leaving the Paris accords—hardly defined ​Trump’s presidency or brought about the calamitous results his critics feared.

 

At year’s end, President Trump found historic success not as a radical outsider but as a sensible, determined, mainstream Republican.

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Michael Medved: Democrats Repeat The Same Bad Mistakes

Opioid

Amid all the evaluations of the first hundred days of President Trump, what about considering the first hundred days of Democrats as the party of opposition?

So far, they’ve shown a destructive tendency to repeat the same mistakes that cost them the election in November.

• First, they focus exclusively on attacking the president while counting on scandal to destroy their opponents.

• Second, Democrats continue to rely on identity politics: trying to rally minorities, women and gays with a sense of victimhood, while demonizing white males. But identity politics doesn’t work: in November, Trump got slightly more votes than Romney among blacks and Latinos, while Clinton failed among her fellow white women—losing that group to Trump by 9 points.

The practice of running strictly negative campaigns and dividing voters into warring demographic groups will lead Democrats to more defeats in the years ahead.

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