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Tag Archives: moral

Michael Medved: Why Democrats Are Suddenly Unforgiving Moralists


An Economist/YouGov poll asks respondents if they’d back “a presidential candidate who has done immoral acts in private life.”

A full 48 percent of Republicans find it acceptable, but only 19 percent of Democrats agree.  After three-decades of Democratic infatuation with the profoundly imperfect Bill and Hillary, this counts as a shock.

Yes, these attitudes reflect the polarized response to the current incumbent but other factors make the GOP less judgmental than the stereotype. More common identification with religion helps Republicans see “immoral acts in private” as nearly universal, so they pick the most capable sinner.

It’s liberals who view politics as life’s highest calling, while conservatives look askance at politicians in general, while feeling ready to trade a bit of private imperfection for a lot of public competence.

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Albert Mohler: A Dark Milestone In the Moral Context of Our Culture

Headlines

On the issue of pornography, the New York Times has just given us an example of what moral surrender looks like.

 

The cover story of the magazine is titled, “What Teenagers Are Learning From Online Porn.”

 

The main argument is that pornography has become the main vehicle for sex education amongst American teenagers. Access appears to be such a given in terms of the adolescent experience in our nation today that the New York Times Magazine article is mostly important because of its central message: This is simply a reality you’re going to have to find a way to deal with it.

 

In one amazing paragraph, the author—Maggie Jones—actually suggests that the moral issue is not whether or not teenagers are looking at pornography, but what kind of pornography they are viewing and whether or not it brings out a certain form of sexism in them.

 

It’s as if—as a society—we’re really past the ability to render moral judgment.

 

It’s another dark milestone in the moral context of our culture.

 

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Albert Mohler: The Moral Confusion of Our Culture

Billy Graham

The moral confusion of our culture was appallingly illustrated in a recent article in the New York Times: “Is your child lying to you? That’s good.”

 

The author, Alex Stone, refers to research suggesting that the children who learn how to lie the earliest are the children who turn out to be smarter. It takes a certain amount of intelligence, after all, to learn how to lie.

 

Your child isn’t lying? Well, don’t worry. The article supplies exercises you can do with your child to speed up the process of learning how to lie.

 

Stone goes on to suggest that one of the worst things parents can do is to punish a lie. Instead, he encourages parents to pay children to tell the truth.

 

We really are living in a world turned upside down when parents in a major American newspaper are told to celebrate when their toddlers lie and are offered tactical advice about how to teach them to lie.

 

It’s a catastrophe. It’s a moral world turned upside down. And that’s no lie.

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Albert Mohler: SCOTUS Takes Up California’s Abortion Law

Headlines

The Supreme Court recently announced that it will take a very important case.

A California law requires crisis pregnancy centers to inform women who come to the centers of the availability of abortion, even requiring the use of specific language. Several of these centers have challenged the constitutionality of this California legislation, arguing that the bill violates their religious liberty, and their free speech, requiring them to state speech to the women who come into those clinics that violates their own convictions.

It is indeed the case that if a crisis pregnancy center in California can be required by law to use government mandated language about abortion, then free speech really doesn’t exist. If the government can mandate the use of language that violates the convictions of the very people who established and volunteer in these crisis pregnancy centers, then religious liberty doesn’t actually exist.

There is no greater moral issue faced by the generation of Americans now living than abortion, and the Supreme Court has decided to wade back into those waters.

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