Tag Archives: morality

Michael Medved: A Core Difference Between the Two Parties

An important new survey from Pew Research Center shows core differences between Republicans and Democrats that go far deeper than their contrasting attitudes toward President Trump.

Republicans proved four-times more likely to agree with the statement that the USA “stands above all other countries in the world”—40 percent, compared to just 10 percent among Democrats. As to the opinion that, “other countries are better than the USA,” an astonishing 31 percent of Democrats and 47 percent of young Democrats supported that statement, while only 9 percent of Republicans agreed.

Why should liberals feel more embarrassed about this remarkable nation that dominates the globe—economically, militarily and culturally? A big part of the contrast involves differences in religious involvement, with Democrats much less likely to attend church, or to embrace the nation’s faith-based heritage. That alienation fosters a sense of guilt and victimhood, rather than the pride and gratitude so essential to success at work, in family relationships and in leading a nation.

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Albert Mohler: Evangelicals and Trump 2020

In the run-up to Christmas, you may have seen coverage of an editorial in Christianity Today by the magazine’s outgoing Editor-in-Chief Mark Galli, calling for the impeachment of President Trump.

The editorial set off a whirlwind.

Galli called the president’s actions with regard to Ukraine, “profoundly immoral.”

“None of the president’s positives,” Galli said, “can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character.”

Many looking at this have said that what is evident is a split between an evangelical elite against President Trump and populist evangelicals for the president.

I’d argue that there’s a third category—that is American evangelicals who understand fully the moral issues at stake, but who also understand the political context and have made a decision to support President Trump, not out of mere political expediency and certainly not out of naivete, but out of their own analysis of what is at stake.

That analysis, rather than CT’s editorial, is likely to have real impact.

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Albert Mohler: A Culture in Crisis

“Drag Queen Story Hour Continues Its Reign at Libraries, Despite Backlash.”

That was the headline of a recent story in the New York Times—a story presented as if there is a normal America where drag queen story hour makes perfect sense and then there is that other backward America that responds with backlash.

Of course, the word “backlash” has negative connotations as if this is some wrongful negative, conservative overreaction.

It’s worth pointing out that these “Drag Queen Story Hours”—and this article admits as much—are targeted at children, because children are impressionable and easily influenced to come to celebrate the life choices of those leading the story time.

In a stunningly short amount of time, we’ve watched a massive restructuring of the entire moral universe of modern America —that makes drag queen story time first unimaginable, the plausible, then actual—and then celebrated.

Yes: We are a culture in crisis.

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Albert Mohler: Teen Vogue Goes Rogue

Perhaps you are familiar with the magazine Teen Vogue—the edition of the fashion magazine targeting 12 and 13-year-old girls.

Now, this doesn’t sound possible, but it is: Teen Vogue has published an article advocating prostitution—advocating “sex work”—to young teen girls.

The title of the piece speaks for itself: “Why Sex Work is Real Work.” The author argues such work can be, “affirming for many people who need human connection, friendship, and emotional support.”

This is unimaginable: When you consider the fact that these young girls are among the key targets of sex traffickers—and the numbers of sex trafficking crimes are skyrocketing—we’re watching more than a moral revolution.

This is an explosion. This is a moral bomb going off.

Sometimes today, parents don’t know something because they don’t want to know.

That’s not an option; not for parents who care about their children

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Michael Medved: For Dems, Hunting Is Worse Than Abortion


A new poll by the Economist/YouGov organization shows glaring contradictions in the way Democrats define morality, with big majorities saying they accept abortion, divorce, gambling, drinking alcohol, gay sex, pre-marital sex and doctor-assisted suicide.

One form of behavior, however, drew overwhelming condemnation: 82 percent found “hunting animals for sport” to be morally wrong!

If this reflects a tender concern for all living things, isn’t it worth asking if a baby in the womb is a living thing? Even if someone don’t consider the baby to be fully human before delivery, surely that unborn child deserves as much respect as, say, a deer.

Yet Democrats find abortion more acceptable than hunting, by a margin of three to one—showing obtuse inconsistency at best, utter derangement at worst.

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Michael Medved: Why Democrats Are Suddenly Unforgiving Moralists


An Economist/YouGov poll asks respondents if they’d back “a presidential candidate who has done immoral acts in private life.”

A full 48 percent of Republicans find it acceptable, but only 19 percent of Democrats agree.  After three-decades of Democratic infatuation with the profoundly imperfect Bill and Hillary, this counts as a shock.

Yes, these attitudes reflect the polarized response to the current incumbent but other factors make the GOP less judgmental than the stereotype. More common identification with religion helps Republicans see “immoral acts in private” as nearly universal, so they pick the most capable sinner.

It’s liberals who view politics as life’s highest calling, while conservatives look askance at politicians in general, while feeling ready to trade a bit of private imperfection for a lot of public competence.

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Albert Mohler: California’s Effort To Legislate Religious Liberty

Billy Graham

The state of California, the nation’s most populous state, is often the epicenter of cultural and moral change in the nation.

Governor Jerry Brown recently vetoed Assembly Bill 569, which would have, shockingly enough, removed religious employers’ ability to make hiring and firing decisions based on their own religious code of sexual ethics.

The bill’s sponsor, Democratic Assemblywoman Lorena Fletcher of San Diego, said that it should be illegal for religious employers to discriminate or take punitive action based on “reproductive decisions.” This would include everything from abortion to sex outside of marriage, she said.

Most Americans will not know about Assembly Bill 569. They won’t understand just how close the nation’s most populous state came to an outright denial of religious liberty by making it illegal for a Christian organization, such as a Christian college or school or university, any kind of Christian ministry, to employ persons based upon very clear Christian convictions concerning sexual morality.

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