Tag Archives: NATO

Lanhee Chen: An Alliance Worth Defending


There’s been a lot of talk recently about whether NATO—an alliance started after World War II—is still relevant in today’s world.  The answer is a simple and unequivocal “yes.” It is.

The alliance is on the front lines of our efforts to counteract Russia’s growing ambitions in Europe and beyond.  But NATO does need to evolve, to meet the growing threats of the 21st century. It should be oriented, for example, toward efforts to counter the growing threats of cyber-terrorism and Russian efforts to meddle in democratic elections in member nations.

And: NATO members must contribute their fair share. President Trump is right to press our European allies to invest more in their own defensive capacities.

But NATO has been, and continues to be, an integral part of our national  security strategy.

It’s an alliance worth defending.

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A Supreme Court Nominee and the Confirmation Battle that Awaits


Townhall Review – July 14, 2018

Hugh Hewitt is joined by Leonard Leo, head of the Federalist Society, to look at the confirmation process for the newly-nominated U. S. Supreme Court Justice. Mike Gallagher turns to Wendy Long to examine the vicious partisanship expected during the confirmation process. CNN’s legal analyst Jeffrey Toobin joins Hugh Hewitt with his analysis of the nominee and the confirmation. Michael Medved speaks with economist Stephen Moore about the latest jobs report. Larry Elder’s guest, Walter Williams, author, columnist, and economics professor at George Mason University, explains why parenting is the number one problem facing education in our African-American urban areas. Mike Gallagher discusses NATO with Michael Desch, Director of the National Security Center at Notre Dame. Dennis Prager asks some questions about the growing “rudeness” phenomenon.

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Michael Medved: Striking a Blow for Decency


Carping criticism of the Trump administration’s handling of the targeted, allied air strikes against the Syrian dictator follows a long, sad tradition in debates on US foreign policy. The Nazis were profoundly evil in World War II, while Britain was noble in opposing them, but many Americans wanted our country to take no side in the struggle.

A few years later, the Soviet Union was indeed an “Evil Empire”, while NATO nations represented the best of Civilization, but leftist skeptics claimed a “moral equivalence” between the two sides in the Cold War.

Today, the three allies who collaborated on the Syria strike – America, Britain and France – are among the most decent nations on earth, while Syria, Iran and Russia are among the most vile regimes. Americans should feel proud that our military has, once again, served honorably on the side of decency.

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