Tag Archives: Neil Gorsuch

Albert Mohler: Abortion Before the Supreme Court

The Supreme Court of the United States heard arguments last week in the first big abortion case since the confirmation of Justices Brett Kavanaugh and Neil Gorsuch.

The case is known as June Medical Services v. Russo. It comes from a Louisiana state law—passed in 2014—requiring abortion clinics to have physicians who are recognized with admitting privileges at local hospitals.

Pro-abortion advocates are using the case to argue that if a woman has a constitutional right to abortion, then she must have a constitutional right to access to abortion.

It’s a very deadly logic.

Pro-life Americans seem not yet to understand what’s at stake in this case, but tellingly the pro-abortion side understands it full well.

The issues at stake are enormous.

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Volume on Impeachment Reaches Distortion Level

Townhall Review – September 28, 2019

Mark Davis talks with Texas Congressman Lance Gooden about the effects the House impeachment efforts might have on international relations.

Mike Gallagher comments on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s move to start impeachment efforts in the House.

Hugh Hewitt and Oklahoma Senator James Lankford talk about the Senate’s role in any impeachment effort.

Seth Leibsohn talks with Marlo Lewis, Senior Fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, about the recent climate strike demonstrations.

Dennis Prager talks with Travis Barham, Senior Counsel with the Alliance Defending Freedom, about its efforts to discourage bullying by governments and colleges.

Hugh Hewitt talks with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch about his book, “A Republic, If You Can Keep It.”

Hugh Hewitt and Pete Peterson, Dean of Pepperdine’s Graduate School of Public Policy, talk about “Viewpoint Diversity.”

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Albert Mohler: Chance of Big Change on America’s Political Landscape

Billy Graham

Can Americans be financially coerced to underwrite labor unions when they are opposed to positions taken by unions?

That was the big issue this week before the nation’s highest court—whether workers can be coerced to financially underwrite and undergird labor unions when the positions taken by the union would be opposed to their own convictions.

The case is known as Janus v. AFSCME—the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees—and it challenges Supreme Court precedent that goes back four decades, requiring persons in certain categories of employment to contribute union dues and fees even when they do not want to be members of the union.

Today, with Justice Neil Gorsuch on the court, it is expected that the court will reverse its 40-year-plus precedent.

This may mean a big, big change on America’s political landscape.

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Michael Medved: Appropriate Praise For The Trump – McConnell Team

Opioid

Some conservatives expressed dismay, and even a sense of betrayal, over the President’s recent press conference with Mitch McConnell, in which Trump praised the Senate Majority Leader for his loyalty and effectiveness. What did Trump have in mind, McConnell’s many right-wing critics seemed to wonder?

Very likely, he appreciated the Kentucky Senator’s stellar record on Judicial nominations. It’s not just that McConnell blocked Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland, enabling the superb appointment of Neil Gorsuch. He also delayed scores of liberal lower court nominees, so that Trump took office with 107 key vacancies to fill—more than four of the last five presidents going back to Reagan.

Kimberley Strassel of the Wall Street Journal praised both McConnell and Trump for nearly 60 consistently conservative judicial appointments so far. She wrote: “McConnell just happens to have a steely passion for remaking the judiciary and deserves credit for the extraordinary class of judicial nominees now coming through.”

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Hugh Hewitt: Sea Change

U.S. Senate

Sea change. An enormous one. That’s the only way to understand President Trump’s first 100 days — as a breaking from and often a breaking of the Obama presidency, one every bit as turbulent as what’s encountered by a sailing ship going from calm seas into a hurricane.

Trump’s first 50 days were a jumble of ups and downs, mostly downs. But beginning with the flawless testimony of Neil M. Gorsuch to the Senate Judiciary Committee and his subsequent confirmation under rules that will speed the way for future Supreme Court nominees, the Trump turnaround began and gained an almost uninterrupted momentum.

The president’s directive to strike Syria after it apparently rained sarin poison on babies and toddlers was a defining moment, reinforced by using the “mother of all bombs” in Afghanistan.

Just imagine what the next three and two-thirds years can bring — if President Trump minimizes the errors of the first 100 days and repeats the parts that have been greeted with broad-based conservative applause.

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Hugh Hewitt: End The “Blue Slip” Tradition

U.S. Senate

The appointment of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the United States Supreme Court was President Trump’s greatest achievement in his first 100 days in office.

Now there are 20 vacancies on the federal circuit courts of appeals and hundreds on the district and special courts, but a huge obstacle stands in the way of the Senate confirmation process: the so-called “blue slip.”

The blue slip is sent to the senators from the home state of every judicial nominee, allowing those senators to approve or veto the nominee.

The blue slip isn’t a law, and it would be anathema to our Constitutional framers. It’s a leftover of decades past, a means by which individual senators could control their region’s judicial future.

It will be up to Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley to seal his place in Senate history as a deeply committed constitutionalist.

If Grassley rids the Senate of the practice forever, his place in the chamber’s history will be secured as a leader who sought to rebalance the institution’s practices in alignment with the framer’s intentions.

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