Tag Archives: New York Times

Hugh Hewitt: Trump at Mount Rushmore

On Friday night last week, the president gave a stirring and patriotic 4th of July speech at Mount Rushmore.

But the reaction from critics and today’s elite media is more telling even than any criticism I could give of the left.

From the Los Angeles Times: “At Mount Rushmore, Trump uses 4th of July celebration to stoke a culture war.”

And the New York Times: “Trump uses Mount Rushmore speech to deliver divisive culture war message.”

And the Associated Press: “Trump pushes racial division, flouts virus rules at Rushmore.”

And I could go on and on.

When you’ve got the left saying up is down and blue is red, then you’ve got obviously an inversion of truth and objectivity in the media.

The need for alternative voices—like mine—and alternative outlets—like the one you’re listening to right now—has never been greater.

Simply put: President Trump’s speech was one of his best.

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Jerry Bowyer: Amazon Joins Other Big Tech in Limiting Dissent

Alex Berenson, a former reporter for the New York Times, garnered a following for straying from the prevailing wisdom of the press regarding coronavirus. His criticism of the shutdowns sparked an inordinate backlash from elite media.

And then he was censored by Amazon.

After he self-published a booklet critical of the lockdowns through Amazon, they took it upon themselves to prevent the public from reading it. As if to add insult to injury, they delivered Berenson a notice implying that his book would be accepted if he removed the references to COVID-19. In a book about COVID-19.

It was only after Elon Musk criticized their censorship that Amazon allowed the book’s publication. Then it hit number one on the Kindle store.

If Amazon continues to limit dissent, the result won’t be conformity with the established order: it will be more consumer revolts against imposed ideology.

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Media Sink to Tragic New Low


Townhall Review – June 13, 2020, 2020

Hugh Hewitt and Washington Examiner chief political correspondent Byron York talk about the New York Times‘ refusal to run an op-ed by Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton about the tragic decline of the New York Times.

Hugh Hewitt and Mike Allen, executive editor of Axios, talk about liberal media reluctance to ask hard questions of Democrats; Axios falls under that umbrella.

Larry Elder gives his take on how the general public views cops and looks at a recent poll that found all races have a favorable view of their local police.

Sebastian Gorka talks with reporter Andy Ngo about is regular coverage of Antifa and their effort to spread anarchy by finding new life in the riots of 2020.

Dennis Prager and Heather MacDonald, author of “The War on Cops,” look at a picture of the African American community that is vastly different from what many activists claim as fact.

Dennis Prager looks at how the left is increasingly threatening free thought in America today; you are simply not allowed to deviate from the leftist mantra.

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Mohler: Our Government Spending-and What It Reveals


Our government spending is way up—and everyone is seemingly fine with it.

A recent headline at the New York Times captured it well: “A Giant Deficit, Once Dreaded, Is Now Desired.” Historically, of course, we’ve had a long-standing argument in American politics about debt, the deficit, and government spending.

But now, all those old rules seem to be completely out the door.

On both sides of the political aisle, we have politicians making arguments they wouldn’t have believed they could have gotten away with just eight weeks ago. Republicans don’t sound like Republicans, and some of the Democrats sound like the kind of Democrat that other Democrats would have run from just weeks ago.

We need to be alerted to the danger of debt—a debt that future generations will have to repay.

Our economic decisions reveal our morality, our culture, our priorities … these decisions eventually reveal who we are.

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Michael Medved: Making Sense of a Localized Crisis

Even the New York Times now acknowledges it: the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t so much a national crisis as it is a localized New York catastrophe. Columnist Bret Stephens shows New York City alone—representing less than 3 percent of the national population—suffered more coronavirus deaths than 41 states combined.

New York State has registered 79 deaths per 100,000 residents; only three states outside the North East—Louisiana, Michigan and Illinois—even show a death rate of more than ten per 100,000. California and Texas, the largest states by population, report combined death rates of less than 4 per 100,000—less than one-nineteenth the New York rate.

Nevertheless, the Big Apple remains the headquarters for national media and financial institutions, which amplifies the impact of the city’s agony. All Americans must care about New York’s losses, but the restrictions applied to citizens in much less afflicted regions don’t need to follow the New York model forever.

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