Tag Archives: New York Times

More Heads Roll as Claims of Harassment Continue

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — December 2, 2017

Hugh Hewitt speaks with Congressman Mike Gallagher, former intelligence officer for the Marines, on what to do about North Korea in light of their latest missile launch.  Salem host Mike Gallagher invites Vice President Mike Pence to also discuss the situation with North Korea. Bill Kristol, editor of the Weekly Standard, discusses the latest sexual harassment allegations concerning Matt Lauer, while Michael Medved and Tim Alberta share the news about Congressman John Conyers and Senator Al Franken and how evidence needs to be corroborated before the media publishes anything. Christina Hoff Sommers, author of “The War Against Boys: How Misguided Feminism is Harming our Young Men,” joins Michael Medved to discuss how false allegations and claims can quickly destroy people’s lives. Sean Trende, Senior Elections Analyst at RealClearPolitics, discusses trends in elections and the implications they have in the upcoming Alabama election. Dennis Prager shares how the media, in particular the New York Times, has it out for men.

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Michael Medved: Winning The War Of Ideas?

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The liberal author of a recent book praising “The Naughty Nineties” and the influence of the Clintons, came to a surprising conclusion about our ongoing battle of ideas. “I thought the left had triumphed,” David Friend told The New York Times. “I was wrong. The more research I did, I realized how huge the advances on the conservative side were, and how the ‘90’s were extremely important for the triumphs of the right we’re seeing today.” He notes the greatly enhanced presence of conservative voices in media, on campus, within religious denominations, and in politics on the local, state and federal levels, when compared to right-wing impotence and irrelevance 25 years ago.

David Friend once worked for left-leaning outlets like CBS and Vanity Fair, and if he’s right, then the startling 2016 victory of President Trump isn’t a fluke, but a reflection of deeper and perhaps lasting changes in the attitudes of the American public.

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Michael Medved: When Political Correctness Tops Personal Decency

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The New York Times recently reported on allegations of shameless sexual harassment by Oscar-winning movie mogul Harvey Weinstein from dozens of young women.

In his bizarre response, Weinstein acknowledged that he “caused a lot of pain” and planned to temporarily step back from corporate power in order to concentrate on therapy. He also promised to compensate for his wrong-doing and “channel that anger” by launching a major campaign against the NRA, while pledging “to make a movie about our president” in order to force Trump’s retirement.

In other words, the guilt-ridden executive hoped for redemption by bashing political opponents rather than improving himself, implying that however badly he behaved, conservatives are worse. He thereby embraced the classic leftist fantasy: that political correctness matters more than destructive personal behavior, no matter how loathsome.

Emphasizing public posturing above private conduct can’t deliver either personal happiness or societal decency.

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Albert Mohler: Marriage For “Most Privileged” Americans

Billy Graham

Something is happening to the American family.

Claire Cain Miller, writing at the New York Times, reports that—quote: “Marriage, which used to be the default way to form a family in the United States, regardless of income or education, has become yet another part of American life reserved for those who are most privileged.”

Back in the 1960s, it was the children of privilege who declared themselves independent of marriage. But as it turned out over time, those who have a greater economic investment tend to be far more conservative in terms of their actual lifestyle choices.

So the more education and income one has, the argument goes, the more an individual has to lose by making bad choices. Conversely, someone with very little income and who sees very little opportunity in the future effectively has less to lose by making those same bad choices.

In reality—as Brad Wilcox from the University of Virginia argues—there is a well-defined success sequence: finish school, get married, then have kids. Breaking that success sequence is one of the most fundamental problems we now face.

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Albert Mohler: The (Sometimes Toxic) Power of Ideas

Billy Graham

The New York Times recently noted the death of a prominent feminist, Kate Millett, who died at 82. The obituary rightly points out that Millett’s book “Sexual Politics” became known as the Bible of Feminism in the ’60s, ’70s, and ’80s.

In her book, published in 1969, included her words, “Patriarchy’s chief institution is the family. It is both a mirror of and a connection with the larger society; a patriarchal unit within a patriarchal whole.”

What she called for was an overthrow of patriarchy, which would involve the complete overthrow the family and marriage and the normativity of heterosexual relationships, and the expectation of having children.

In the end, Kate Millett died a very sad life. The passing of Kate Millett reminds us of how these kinds of ideas and come into our culture and of the toxic effects that they often have. But very sadly, it also reminds us that any worldview that sees the having and raising of children as a problem and as a burden rather than as a blessing cannot but end in sadness.

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Michael Medved: Unexpected Praise for Trump’s Turnaround

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One of history’s worst natural disasters produced one of the best weeks of Donald Trump’s presidency so far. The chief executive and his administration rose to the challenge of responding to Hurricane Harvey and even his implacable media critics praised his change in attitude.

The normally hostile New York Times, for instance, featured two positive headlines: “Trump, in Texas, Says His Goal is the Best Relief Effort Ever” and “Hurricane Gives Trump a Chance to Reclaim the Power to Unify.”

What was so different about the president’s tone? In reacting to the catastrophe, he didn’t attack, ridicule or blame anyone; he didn’t punch—or counterpunch—at his favorite targets in politics or media. Instead, he sought to lift up, rather than to run down—an effort that inspired new hope for a successful presidency.

As he now pivots toward tax reform and other crucial issues, he should continue to concentrate on the constructive while trying to remember two key words: stay positive!

 

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Michael Medved: Defying the “Success Sequence”

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The New York Times recently acknowledged that some of the recent changes in marriage and childbearing have damaged our country. Noting that a big majority—55 percent—of first children born to millennial couples are now born outside of marriage, columnist David Leonhardt explained that this “new normal” violates the “success sequence” established long-ago by the Brookings Institution.

That research proved that young people, whatever their background, could minimize any chance of long-term poverty by taking thee simple steps: graduating from high school, getting a job—any job—right after graduation from high school or college, and bearing children only after marriage, not before.

The success sequence shows that good choices can help all people avoid bad outcomes, even if they’re disadvantaged, while bad choices are likely to produce bad outcomes, even for the more privileged. Welcoming children in their traditional context of marital commitment will benefit those children, their parents and society at large.

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