Tag Archives: New York

How Big Tech is Fueling Cancel Culture


Townhall Review for March 6, 2021

Hugh Hewitt talks with Georgia Governor Brian Kemp about the recent COVID stimulus package that appears to favor blue states, like New York and California.

Kevin McCullough and Karol Markowicz, of the New York Post, discuss the sexual harassment allegations facing New York Governor Mario Cuomo.

Hugh Hewitt talks with former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer about the recall effort of California Governor Gavin Newsom and who would replace him if he is recalled.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson discuss big tech censorship efforts with Ryan Anderson, of the Ethics and Public Policy Center.

Seth Leibsohn looks at the latest target of the cancel culture, Dr. Seuss.

Dennis Prager takes another look at the left and the cancel culture’s latest victim, Mr. Potato Head.

Charlie Kirk looks at the teacher’s unions efforts to keep schools closed all the while sending their own kids to in-class private schools.

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Ed Morrissey: Governor Cuomo’s Deadly COVID Secret Exposed

Few politicians have received the level of adulation of New York Governor Andrew Cuomo over the course of this pandemic. National media painted him as a hero, Hollywood gave him an Emmy for his press conferences, and his publisher released Cuomo’s self-congratulatory book hailing his own leadership. All of this idolization deliberately distracted from a deadly secret: Cuomo’s policy forcing nursing homes to admit COVID-19 positive patients resulted in thousands of deaths, and Cuomo’s administration hid it for months to avoid potential prosecution.

Now that this secret has been exposed, the New York legislature has no choice but to demand accountability from Governor Cuomo. Thousands of elderly New Yorkers died as a result Cuomo’s policies—his own top aide has admitted as much. Legacy media outlets should also be held accountable. They lionized Cuomo even while questions about this policy and its deadly effects were being asked.

The nation should demand more from our public servants than entertainment awards and deception.

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Michael Medved: The Left’s Fanatical Substitute for Faith

In late April, hundreds of Orthodox Jews gathered for the funeral of a beloved Chassidic rabbi, but New York’s mayor deemed their rites “absolutely unacceptable” and threatened mass arrests if it happened again.

A month later, tens of thousands of angry, often violent protestors, rallied for Black Lives Matter but the same mayor encouraged them, boasting of his own daughter’s participation. Simultaneously, 1,300 medical and public health professionals who had previously advocated strict social distancing, signed a statement in support of mass demonstrations and, idiotically, called them “vital to the national public health.”

This ludicrous, illogical switch demonstrates that so-called “social justice activism” has become a substitute religion for secular progressives—with its own saints, martyrs and intolerant, unassailable creed. In this replacement faith, the holiest sacrament is public protest—not because it achieves anything practical but because it amounts to a form of self-destructive, fanatical, secular worship.

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Should Undergrads Take the Year Off? Seth Leibsohn with Pete Peterson

Seth Leibsohn invites Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, to talk about Pepperdine’s plan for the fall, the power of reaching out to an author whose book you enjoyed, the conflict between “credentialing-up” and it not mattering where you went to college, Florida’s Chinese Coronavirus statistics compared to New York’s, and music.

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Michael Medved: Making Sense of a Localized Crisis

Even the New York Times now acknowledges it: the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t so much a national crisis as it is a localized New York catastrophe. Columnist Bret Stephens shows New York City alone—representing less than 3 percent of the national population—suffered more coronavirus deaths than 41 states combined.

New York State has registered 79 deaths per 100,000 residents; only three states outside the North East—Louisiana, Michigan and Illinois—even show a death rate of more than ten per 100,000. California and Texas, the largest states by population, report combined death rates of less than 4 per 100,000—less than one-nineteenth the New York rate.

Nevertheless, the Big Apple remains the headquarters for national media and financial institutions, which amplifies the impact of the city’s agony. All Americans must care about New York’s losses, but the restrictions applied to citizens in much less afflicted regions don’t need to follow the New York model forever.

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