Tag Archives: New York

Michael Medved: The Left’s Fanatical Substitute for Faith

In late April, hundreds of Orthodox Jews gathered for the funeral of a beloved Chassidic rabbi, but New York’s mayor deemed their rites “absolutely unacceptable” and threatened mass arrests if it happened again.

A month later, tens of thousands of angry, often violent protestors, rallied for Black Lives Matter but the same mayor encouraged them, boasting of his own daughter’s participation. Simultaneously, 1,300 medical and public health professionals who had previously advocated strict social distancing, signed a statement in support of mass demonstrations and, idiotically, called them “vital to the national public health.”

This ludicrous, illogical switch demonstrates that so-called “social justice activism” has become a substitute religion for secular progressives—with its own saints, martyrs and intolerant, unassailable creed. In this replacement faith, the holiest sacrament is public protest—not because it achieves anything practical but because it amounts to a form of self-destructive, fanatical, secular worship.

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Should Undergrads Take the Year Off? Seth Leibsohn with Pete Peterson

Seth Leibsohn invites Pete Peterson, Dean of the Pepperdine School of Public Policy, to talk about Pepperdine’s plan for the fall, the power of reaching out to an author whose book you enjoyed, the conflict between “credentialing-up” and it not mattering where you went to college, Florida’s Chinese Coronavirus statistics compared to New York’s, and music.

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Michael Medved: Making Sense of a Localized Crisis

Even the New York Times now acknowledges it: the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t so much a national crisis as it is a localized New York catastrophe. Columnist Bret Stephens shows New York City alone—representing less than 3 percent of the national population—suffered more coronavirus deaths than 41 states combined.

New York State has registered 79 deaths per 100,000 residents; only three states outside the North East—Louisiana, Michigan and Illinois—even show a death rate of more than ten per 100,000. California and Texas, the largest states by population, report combined death rates of less than 4 per 100,000—less than one-nineteenth the New York rate.

Nevertheless, the Big Apple remains the headquarters for national media and financial institutions, which amplifies the impact of the city’s agony. All Americans must care about New York’s losses, but the restrictions applied to citizens in much less afflicted regions don’t need to follow the New York model forever.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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Getting America Back on Track


Townhall Review – April 25, 2020

Hugh Hewitt talks with Secretary of State Mike Pompeo about the deception China funneled to much of the planet via the World Health Organization.

Sebastian Gorka and former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani talk about America’s resilience during crisis.

Hugh Hewitt talks with National Security Advisor Robert C. O’Brien about the Chinese government’s lack of transparency and how that affects combating COVID-19 and other viruses that originated in China.

Kevin McCullough and Gordon Chang talk about the dangers of China and their impact on the world around them.

Hugh Hewitt talks with U.S. Attorney General William Barr about the challenges facing and actions taken by President Trump in combating the Coronavirus.

Dennis Prager talks with Dr. Vladimir Zelenko about his methods of treating patients infected with COVID-19.

Hugh Hewitt and David Cortman, senior counsel for the Alliance Defending Freedom, talk about defending the rights of churches as restrictions are being placed on gatherings to combat COVID-19.

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Michael Medved: Democrats Elevate Their Least Likeable Leaders

In the midst of their seemingly endless and unpredictable fight for the 2020 presidential nomination, does it make sense for Democrats to promote some of their least likable Congressional leaders as the new face of their party?

The result of the new impeachment investigation, assigned to six different House committees, is that the leaders of those committees—including Maxine Waters, Jerry Nadler, Adam Schiff and Elijah Cummings—will dominate the debate and upstage the flailing presidential contenders.

As it happens, all six chairs are from New York, California, Maryland and Massachusetts, perfectly positioned to alienate key suburban voters in swing states that will decide the outcome of the election. The impeachment pursuit elevates some of the Democrats’ least appealing proponents to positions of pre-eminence, helping to ensure party losses in the upcoming battles for control of the House, the Senate and the White House.

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