Tag Archives: Nomination

The First Debate and President Trump’s Third Nominee to the Supreme Court


Townhall Review – October 3, 2020

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson turn to John Nolte of Breitbart to talk about the fiery Presidential Debate.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse about President Trump’s nomination of Amy Coney Barrett to serve as Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Mike Gallagher looks at the debate free-for-all and how it was handled by its moderator, Chris Wallace of Fox News.

Sebastian Gorka talks with Victor Davis Hansen, Hoover Institution scholar, looks at President Trump’s accomplishments during his first term.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Elaine Parker, of KeepAmericaAmerica.com, about the actual balloting process in the upcoming election.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talks with Rod Dreher about his book, “Live Not By Lies – A Manual for Christian Dissidents.”

Hugh Hewitt and Texas Senator Ted Cruz talk about the debate and his book, “One Vote Away – How a Single Supreme Court Seat Could Change History.”

Charlie Kirk examines ballot harvesting as uncovered in Minnesota’s Fifth Congressional District during an investigation by Project Veritas.

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Nomination of a Supreme Court Justice and the Burning Rage from Dems: Hugh Hewitt with Senator Ted Cruz

Hugh Hewitt talks with Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX), Member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, on whether the Supreme Court nominee should receive a vote before November 3rd. Ted Cruz also gives a sneak peek at his latest book, One Vote Away: How a Single Supreme Court Seat Can Change History.

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Biden Surges after Super Tuesday Triumph

Townhall Review – March 7, 2020

Hugh Hewitt talks with NBC News correspondent Steve Kornacki about the latest in the Democratic primary race to the nomination.

Mike Gallagher weighs in on the battle for the nomination that is now between Bernie Sanders and Joe Biden.

Hugh Hewitt and Trump Campaign Spokesman Tim Murtaugh talk about the possibilities of a campaign between President Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden.

Hugh Hewitt talks with David Cortman of the Alliance Defending Freedom about a religious freedom case that is now headed to the Supreme Court.

Sebastian Gorka chats with Chris Farrell of Judicial Watch about their upcoming deposition of Hillary Clinton regarding her personal servers and Benghazi.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Epoch Times investigative reporter Josh Philipp about China’s handling of the Coronavirus outbreak.

Dennis Prager talks about a “Never Trumper” who now says if Bernie Sanders is the Democratic nominee, he will vote for President Trump.

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Michael Medved: Polls Can’t Predict Trump’s Democratic Opponent

Our fascination with polls sometimes produces premature conclusions about next year’s presidential race, including the assumptions that Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden will fight it out for the Democratic nomination. Past polling a year before elections has demonstrated scant predictive value: for 2004, Wesley Clark and Howard Dean were the clear Democratic front-runners, but neither survived the early primaries; John Kerry, who grabbed the nomination, ran fifth at this point.

Four years later, for 2008, Rudy Giuliani was way ahead among Republicans—topping the ultimate nominee, John McCain, more than 2 to 1. And in 2016, Donald Trump was a full six points behind then front-runner Ben Carson—who’s now in Trump’s cabinet. Primary contests are unpredictable, particularly with complicated races and multiple candidates. There’s still time for new entrants like Mike Bloomberg, or some other surprise latecomer, to shake up the faltering Democratic field.

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Michael Medved: Joe Biden: Combining Radical Substance with Moderate Style?


In campaigning for president, Joe Biden faces a difficult dilemma: if he moves left to placate his party’s increasingly socialistic base, he’ll lose the moderate support he needs to challenge Donald Trump. But if he runs as a compromising centrist, enraged party progressives will block his nomination.

The problem is that satisfying progressives requires such radical positions—like racial reparations, forgiving student loans, and banning private health insurance—that middle-of-the-road voters won’t be reassured by an easy-going style. If the election becomes a referendum on a stridently leftist Democratic platform, Republicans should be able to build a big majority in opposition.

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