Tag Archives: NYT

Michael Medved: The Obnoxious Term “Latinx”

The term “Latinx”, has become the increasingly common substitute for the terms “Latino” or “Hispanic” in the politically correct, prestige press. The “For Kids” section of the New York Times helpfully explained that “the X is an effort to make the word more inclusive, because it accounts for a wider spectrum of gender identities than just male and female.”

The problem for this self-proclaimed “inclusive” approach is that Hispanics themselves overwhelmingly reject it. In an August Pew Research Survey, 61 percent preferred the word “Hispanic” while another 29 percent chose “Latino”, amounting 90 percent of Hispanic Americans. Only 3 percent said they used “Latinx” to describe themselves, while 12 percent who had even heard of the word, said they actively disliked it. The crushing disregard for the clumsy formulation “Latinx” provides a reassuring reminder that the cutting-edge activists of the radical left won’t make easy headway in the Hispanic community, with its solid, more traditional, cultural values.

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Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and the American Family

The COVID-19 pandemic has done a lot to reveal the importance of the family.

Over these past five months we’ve seen a fascinating and revealing debate about the education of our children—with new conversations about public and private schooling, and of course new attention paid to homeschooling.

We’re seeing a lot of talk as well about justice and equality, about the role of parents and the structure of families.

This revealing headline recently appeared in the New York Times: “Every Choice for Parents Contains Potential Risks or Unfair Advantages.”

Claire Cain Miller writes, “It’s the newest front in America’s parenting wars,”—and you can count on the fact now that parents are getting judged and criticized as she says, “on message boards and in backyard meetups and virtual PTA meetings.”

But our pandemic has served to reveal that there is no structure, no program, no government intervention that can ever replace a functioning intact family with a mom and a dad.

Family provides benefit.

For that we should be grateful—and not ashamed—and not ashamed to say it.

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Albert Mohler: God Made Us in His Image, Male and Female

A recent article in the New York Times demands our attention. The headline: “Sex Does Not Mean Gender. Equating Them Erases Trans Lives.”

The author argues that sex should not be equated with gender—because gender is a socially-constructed reality that does not have anything to do with biological sex.

But basic reality is indeed tied integrally and inseparably from biology. In sex—as male and female—we are looking at basic reality, part of the created order.

The author goes on to state: “In fact, stop using sex-based words to refer to people at all. They’re words for bodies, not for people with hearts and souls and minds.”

But keep this in mind—we are created as individuals who are a unity— body and soul.

We are who we are, including our bodies, because God made us this way and He made us in His image.

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Jerry Bowyer: Amazon Joins Other Big Tech in Limiting Dissent

Alex Berenson, a former reporter for the New York Times, garnered a following for straying from the prevailing wisdom of the press regarding coronavirus. His criticism of the shutdowns sparked an inordinate backlash from elite media.

And then he was censored by Amazon.

After he self-published a booklet critical of the lockdowns through Amazon, they took it upon themselves to prevent the public from reading it. As if to add insult to injury, they delivered Berenson a notice implying that his book would be accepted if he removed the references to COVID-19. In a book about COVID-19.

It was only after Elon Musk criticized their censorship that Amazon allowed the book’s publication. Then it hit number one on the Kindle store.

If Amazon continues to limit dissent, the result won’t be conformity with the established order: it will be more consumer revolts against imposed ideology.

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Michael Medved: Making Sense of a Localized Crisis

Even the New York Times now acknowledges it: the COVID-19 pandemic isn’t so much a national crisis as it is a localized New York catastrophe. Columnist Bret Stephens shows New York City alone—representing less than 3 percent of the national population—suffered more coronavirus deaths than 41 states combined.

New York State has registered 79 deaths per 100,000 residents; only three states outside the North East—Louisiana, Michigan and Illinois—even show a death rate of more than ten per 100,000. California and Texas, the largest states by population, report combined death rates of less than 4 per 100,000—less than one-nineteenth the New York rate.

Nevertheless, the Big Apple remains the headquarters for national media and financial institutions, which amplifies the impact of the city’s agony. All Americans must care about New York’s losses, but the restrictions applied to citizens in much less afflicted regions don’t need to follow the New York model forever.

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Dan Proft: When Democrats Lose the New York Times…

New York Times columnist David Brooks wants Democrats to drop their impeachment gambit.

His colleague Bret Stephens wants Democratic presidential candidates to pare down their essentially socialist proposals that would Venezuela-ize the American economy.

And the brothers Emanuel—my former mayor, Rahm and Ari—don’t think it’s a good idea to tell 150 million Americans that even if they like their private health insurance they don’t get to keep it.

And what’s the response?

Elizabeth Warren continues to push her complete set of Marxist fantasies.

Joe Biden calls for fossil fuel company executives—yes—to be imprisoned.

And Pete Buttigieg wants to decriminalize all illegal drugs in the face of the opioid crisis.

As we enter the election year, Democrats are divided into two camps.

One wants to defeat Trump at the ballot box.

The other just wants to exact vengeance on Trump voters.

All the candidates to this point are in the “vengeance” camp.

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