Tag Archives: pandemic

Strachan: Time to Consider a National Reset


The Coronavirus pandemic is awful. Nonetheless we should not miss that this event allows us the opportunity to take stock of our national health.

Here’s one angle. For decades, Americans have watched as uncritical globalism has shipped hometown jobs to overseas locales. Many hard-working people have lost employment, with many men struggling greatly. Opioids have filled the gap, leaving families ravaged in their wake.

Too long have we just watched these trends. Too long have our towns crumbled, our families pulled apart. Too long have we tolerated economic chaos to buy trinkets for a few dollars less. The social costs have been staggering.

A global economy bears many benefits to us all. But uncritical globalism has had major consequences. We need masks, for example, but depend upon a corrupt Chinese government for them. The irony is thick.

Now is a great time to imagine what a national reset could look like.

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Medved: Passover in a Pandemic


At festive Passover celebrations, Jewish people traditionally ask: “Why is this night different from all other nights.” Well, this year, we’ll ask: “Why is this Passover different from all other Passovers?”

In place of Seder tables packed with family and friends, most of us will dine alone—sitting down only with those who share the same domicile. But Passover in a pandemic does call to mind an often-ignored aspect of the original Exodus story.

The Jewish people didn’t go from slavery to liberation the moment we left Egypt—first we trekked 50 days to Sinai to receive The Law, with 40 more wilderness years after that before entering the promised land.

Today’s Americans face weeks, even months, of continued disruption before resuming normal life. Celebrating Passover alone, my wife and I will recall that true liberation is never instantaneous, but part of a rough, tough, ennobling process.

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Strachan: Tough-Minded and Hope-Filled


79 years ago, a man said this amidst global crisis:

“Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never…”

Winston Churchill’s wise words capture the Western spirit. This is called “intransigence”—unyielding toughness.

But what about when our trials threaten to overwhelm us? When a pandemic attacks the globe, and panic seizes many?

Here we see that we see that we need more than toughness: we need hope. Combining the two, we need tough-minded hope.

But where is hope? When the headlines constantly shift and the nations rage, we feel tremendous instability. We need hope in something beyond us. We are not sufficient for these things.

This is Easter season. Here is where we find tremendous, surging hope: a man felled by death to atone for our sins was resurrected to life.

Death seems triumphant today. But death doesn’t have the last word.

Tough-minded hope—Easter hope, resurrection hope—does have the final word.

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Hewitt: The New “Master of the Senate”


Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has emerged as the keystone of our nation’s capitol.

Amid a pandemic threat that has caused the nation’s worst crisis since 9/11 coupled with fiscal/economic challenges that are already the equal of the Great Recession, McConnell has been nothing short of “magnificent.”

That description came from former House speaker Newt Gingrich, who went on in his interview with me last week to call McConnell, “one of the most important Senate leaders in American history.”

Gingrich is right.

The complexity of our time, the depth of partisan rancor and the intensity of media glare will help secure McConnell’s legacy as among the most talented legislators in our nation’s history.

They called LBJ the “Master of the Senate.” In times of crisis. it’s comforting to have a leader every bit LBJ’s equal at work for the country, the Constitution and the Republican Party.

We are witnessing Leader McConnell at his finest hour.

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Michael Medved: Israel’s “National Unity” Compromise

The coronavirus forced a resolution of Israel’s polarizing, paralyzing political stalemate. Benny Gantz, the former army chief-of-staff who fought Prime Minister Netanyahu to a virtual tie in three national elections in the course of a year, finally accepted his rival’s invitation to join “an emergency national unity government” to fight the pandemic.

To do so, Gantz had to split with the left-leaning elements of his Blue-and-White Party. Now this isn’t a betrayal—it’s a demonstration of putting patriotism above party. Netanyahu also agreed to concessions—after 18 more months in the top job, Israel’s longest-serving Prime Minister will also step down and enable his new partner to become Prime Minister for the next eighteen months. The clearest winner in all this is the nation of Israel, which sends a message to her American friends about the importance of coalition and compromise, especially in times of peril.

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Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and Our New Heroes

What does it mean to be a hero?

The dictionary defines a hero in terms of courage, achievement and morality. In practice, our culture’s heroes have commonly been sports figures, such as Olympians or military figures.

But heroism is really about doing the right thing and standing for the right virtues even when the world isn’t watching. Many of the most heroic acts undertaken in human history are unknown to me or to you or to history—but they are not unknown to God.

In this crucial moment, we need a new category of heroes. Today, our heroes include doctors, nurses, and medical staff on the frontlines of the global pandemic. They are putting their lives at risk in order to protect and extend the lives of others.

But the notion of a hero has expanded to those who are stocking the grocery store shelves and delivering our packages—people who are making the world work and trying to keep all the pieces of society together.

We’re seeing heroism where we never knew to find it before.

As a society, we don’t pass out gold medals to grocery store stockers or to X-ray technicians. But when you think about it, we probably should.

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Owen Strachan: We’re All Pro-Borders Now

Are borders a bad thing or a good thing?

In recent years we’ve seen a lively debate on the issue—with conservatives taking a pounding for enforced borders and responsible immigration policy. The very notion of a nation having borders and a careful framework for welcoming immigrants to protect citizens, has been characterized as backward, racist—even evil.

The coronavirus pandemic has shifted the conversation. The same people calling for open borders are now calling for restrictions on travel. In an ironic twist that they might not see themselves, the left has suddenly become pro nation-state and pro borders—not just between countries, but between individuals.

The global crisis is giving us all a master-class in why security matters, why nations matters, and why leftist ideas don’t work. Unimpeded globalism sounds great on Twitter, but works poorly in the real world.

Borders aren’t evil.

They’re necessary—and they’re for our good.

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