Tag Archives: pandemic

Lanhee Chen: The Key Piece for Recovery: School

College students should be returning to campus this fall.

For some colleges and universities, the decision to bring back in-person research and instruction is a matter of basic economic survival.

But even where it is not, the pandemic crisis threatens the essence of college life. Even the best distance-learning program cannot replace the normal interactions that take place on the college campus.

A return to in-person instruction should follow a strategy based on the latest science, balanced with efforts to restore campus life and protect the vulnerable.

It begins with a comprehensive testing and contact tracing plan. Colleges should also focus on residential environments where social distancing may be difficult.

Not all students or faculty will be able to come back at the same time.

Some combination of distance learning with in-person instruction will be needed.

It will be tough to bring students back to college campuses this fall, but it’s an effort well worth making.

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Obamagate, the Economy and China’s Culpability


Townhall Review – May 16, 2020

Hugh Hewitt talks with Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton about two huge scandals; Chinese culpability on the coronavirus and Obamagate, intentional interference with the peaceful transfer of power between presidential administrations.

Dennis Prager and Kimberly Strassel, of the Wall Street Journal, talk about all things Flynn, Russia, Mueller Special Counsel and the impeachment.

Larry Elder talks about the murder of Ahmaud Arbery and the slow response of officials to bring charges.

Hugh Hewitt talks with former Israeli Ambassador Michael Oren about confusing, yet normal, Israeli politics.

Hugh Hewitt and Florida Congressman and former Green Beret Michael Waltz about China and the future of U.S.-China relations.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Florida Senator Marco Rubio about the economic cost of the coronavirus and the government response.

Sebastian Gorka talks with Matthew Whitaker about his book, “Above the Law: The Inside Story of How the Justice Department Tried to Subvert President Trump.”

Mike Gallagher examines Sweden’s limited shutdown to avert the COVID-19 pandemic, avoiding an economic crisis.

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Hugh Hewitt: Trump’s Counterattack and the Prospects for Recovery

President Trump continues to lead an effective counterattack against the coronavirus pandemic. The economic ruin is vast—but a V-shaped recovery seems possible if congressional Democrats will move as quickly as Trump has.

Small businesses and not-for-profits have been clamoring for replenishment of the Paycheck Protection Program. By blocking additional funding over this past weekend, House Speaker Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Schumer forfeited their right to be taken seriously as tribunes for middle class or blue-collar workers.

The Democratic blue bubble is thick, and the air within it turns out to be a heck of a drug. Cable TV talking heads and left-wing Twitter seem to believe with deep conviction that COVID-19’s human carnage and the economic ruin will be blamed on the President.

But the American people see an administration on the offensive, determined to beat the virus and restart the U.S. economy as soon as it is safe to do so.

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Lanhee Chen: The World Health Organization Is in Need of Reform

President Trump should be applauded for his decision to halt funding to the World Health Organization while the administration reviews the group’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

You and I—the U.S. taxpayers—write a $400 million blank check to the WHO each year. It’s an organization that is broken and long overdue for fundamental reform.

In its handling of the coronavirus pandemic, the WHO has demonstrated that it puts politics over public health.

During the critical weeks and months when the virus began its spread in China and then around the world, the WHO seemed more interested in playing politics—deferring to China—rather than taking the actions that could have saved lives around the world.

We should not waste this opportunity to bring about the lasting, positive changes that will ultimately save lives and improve public health not just here, but around the world as well.

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Strachan: Time to Consider a National Reset


The Coronavirus pandemic is awful. Nonetheless we should not miss that this event allows us the opportunity to take stock of our national health.

Here’s one angle. For decades, Americans have watched as uncritical globalism has shipped hometown jobs to overseas locales. Many hard-working people have lost employment, with many men struggling greatly. Opioids have filled the gap, leaving families ravaged in their wake.

Too long have we just watched these trends. Too long have our towns crumbled, our families pulled apart. Too long have we tolerated economic chaos to buy trinkets for a few dollars less. The social costs have been staggering.

A global economy bears many benefits to us all. But uncritical globalism has had major consequences. We need masks, for example, but depend upon a corrupt Chinese government for them. The irony is thick.

Now is a great time to imagine what a national reset could look like.

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Medved: Passover in a Pandemic


At festive Passover celebrations, Jewish people traditionally ask: “Why is this night different from all other nights.” Well, this year, we’ll ask: “Why is this Passover different from all other Passovers?”

In place of Seder tables packed with family and friends, most of us will dine alone—sitting down only with those who share the same domicile. But Passover in a pandemic does call to mind an often-ignored aspect of the original Exodus story.

The Jewish people didn’t go from slavery to liberation the moment we left Egypt—first we trekked 50 days to Sinai to receive The Law, with 40 more wilderness years after that before entering the promised land.

Today’s Americans face weeks, even months, of continued disruption before resuming normal life. Celebrating Passover alone, my wife and I will recall that true liberation is never instantaneous, but part of a rough, tough, ennobling process.

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Strachan: Tough-Minded and Hope-Filled


79 years ago, a man said this amidst global crisis:

“Never give in, never give in, never, never, never, never…”

Winston Churchill’s wise words capture the Western spirit. This is called “intransigence”—unyielding toughness.

But what about when our trials threaten to overwhelm us? When a pandemic attacks the globe, and panic seizes many?

Here we see that we see that we need more than toughness: we need hope. Combining the two, we need tough-minded hope.

But where is hope? When the headlines constantly shift and the nations rage, we feel tremendous instability. We need hope in something beyond us. We are not sufficient for these things.

This is Easter season. Here is where we find tremendous, surging hope: a man felled by death to atone for our sins was resurrected to life.

Death seems triumphant today. But death doesn’t have the last word.

Tough-minded hope—Easter hope, resurrection hope—does have the final word.

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