Tag Archives: pandemic

Hewitt: The New “Master of the Senate”


Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has emerged as the keystone of our nation’s capitol.

Amid a pandemic threat that has caused the nation’s worst crisis since 9/11 coupled with fiscal/economic challenges that are already the equal of the Great Recession, McConnell has been nothing short of “magnificent.”

That description came from former House speaker Newt Gingrich, who went on in his interview with me last week to call McConnell, “one of the most important Senate leaders in American history.”

Gingrich is right.

The complexity of our time, the depth of partisan rancor and the intensity of media glare will help secure McConnell’s legacy as among the most talented legislators in our nation’s history.

They called LBJ the “Master of the Senate.” In times of crisis. it’s comforting to have a leader every bit LBJ’s equal at work for the country, the Constitution and the Republican Party.

We are witnessing Leader McConnell at his finest hour.

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Michael Medved: Israel’s “National Unity” Compromise

The coronavirus forced a resolution of Israel’s polarizing, paralyzing political stalemate. Benny Gantz, the former army chief-of-staff who fought Prime Minister Netanyahu to a virtual tie in three national elections in the course of a year, finally accepted his rival’s invitation to join “an emergency national unity government” to fight the pandemic.

To do so, Gantz had to split with the left-leaning elements of his Blue-and-White Party. Now this isn’t a betrayal—it’s a demonstration of putting patriotism above party. Netanyahu also agreed to concessions—after 18 more months in the top job, Israel’s longest-serving Prime Minister will also step down and enable his new partner to become Prime Minister for the next eighteen months. The clearest winner in all this is the nation of Israel, which sends a message to her American friends about the importance of coalition and compromise, especially in times of peril.

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Albert Mohler: COVID-19 and Our New Heroes

What does it mean to be a hero?

The dictionary defines a hero in terms of courage, achievement and morality. In practice, our culture’s heroes have commonly been sports figures, such as Olympians or military figures.

But heroism is really about doing the right thing and standing for the right virtues even when the world isn’t watching. Many of the most heroic acts undertaken in human history are unknown to me or to you or to history—but they are not unknown to God.

In this crucial moment, we need a new category of heroes. Today, our heroes include doctors, nurses, and medical staff on the frontlines of the global pandemic. They are putting their lives at risk in order to protect and extend the lives of others.

But the notion of a hero has expanded to those who are stocking the grocery store shelves and delivering our packages—people who are making the world work and trying to keep all the pieces of society together.

We’re seeing heroism where we never knew to find it before.

As a society, we don’t pass out gold medals to grocery store stockers or to X-ray technicians. But when you think about it, we probably should.

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Owen Strachan: We’re All Pro-Borders Now

Are borders a bad thing or a good thing?

In recent years we’ve seen a lively debate on the issue—with conservatives taking a pounding for enforced borders and responsible immigration policy. The very notion of a nation having borders and a careful framework for welcoming immigrants to protect citizens, has been characterized as backward, racist—even evil.

The coronavirus pandemic has shifted the conversation. The same people calling for open borders are now calling for restrictions on travel. In an ironic twist that they might not see themselves, the left has suddenly become pro nation-state and pro borders—not just between countries, but between individuals.

The global crisis is giving us all a master-class in why security matters, why nations matters, and why leftist ideas don’t work. Unimpeded globalism sounds great on Twitter, but works poorly in the real world.

Borders aren’t evil.

They’re necessary—and they’re for our good.

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Best Practices to Prevent Spread and Infection from Coronavirus: Hugh Hewitt and Dr. Anthony Fauci

Hugh Hewitt invites Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, to discuss the best practices to prevent infection from the coronavirus. They also discuss the latest in coronavirus testing developments.

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Hugh Hewitt: An Aggressive Posture Against Coronavirus

As we look at the coronavirus today, we do well to remember that serial under-response was the tragic story of U.S. and global reaction to the mislabeled Spanish flu of 1918. That pandemic claimed at least 675,000 lives in the United States and as many as 100 million around the world. The best guess of where it originated was—of all places—rural Kansas.

There’s no worse strategy than secrecy for safeguarding the public from a pandemic. It’s true that panic is a threat, but secrecy and innuendo fuel panic. Already, the U.S. government is behind the curve despite Trump’s demands that it get and remain ahead of coronavirus worries.

The appointment of Vice President Pence to lead is a very good development.

A virus can’t be killed with words, but panic can be steamrolled with information. Hopefully, Vice President Pence and the entire task force won’t settle for business as usual, because this isn’t a usual flu.

Better to be accused of overreaction today than convicted later of indifference.

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