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Tag Archives: Peace

Lanhee Chen: Encouraging Developments on North Korea


When it comes to North Korea, the old adage of “Trust, but verify” isn’t nearly enough. We should—absolutely—be skeptical of the rogue regime’s claims. And we should, of course, hold them accountable for whatever promises they might make.

But we should still be encouraged by Kim Jong Un’s recent statements that he wants peace and is committed to stopping his nuclear weapons tests.

A lot of hard work stands between where we are and where we want to go, but the Trump Administration deserves credit for bringing us this far. The key question is whether President Trump can produce a deal that completely ends that country’s nuclear weapons program.

In his efforts, Trump is assisted by an all-star team of aides: Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, National Security Adviser John Bolton, and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis.  If anyone can get this right, we should have confidence in this team.

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Michael Medved: Partisanship Trumps Policy in Reacting to North Korea


Reactions to White House plans to meet with Kim Jong-Un highlight the damaging impact of partisan polarization and obsessive Trump hatred.

Had Barack Obama arranged to negotiate with the brutal North Korean dictator, some of the same Democrats now deriding Trump would have hailed their hero as a bold visionary, deserving of a second Nobel prize.

Some of the voices that blamed Trump for incendiary rhetoric leading toward needless war now attack him for reckless concessions in pursuit of peace. Of course, this new initiative could still collapse in a U.S. setback, but Americans should give the president broad support to strengthen his hand. Yes, Trump true-believers can sometimes embarrass themselves by claiming the president can do no wrong, but his die-hard critics damage our politics by insisting that he can do no right.

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Lanhee Chen: A Potential of Breakthrough on North Korea

President Trump shocked the world when he agreed to meet with North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un.  While there’s reason to be skeptical of Kim’s motives and tactics, we should all acknowledge that the President has managed to secure a major diplomatic breakthrough in the crisis.

Now comes the hard work of making the meeting a productive one. North Korea has long dangled the prospect of disarmament in return for various concessions from America and its allies. Never before has the rogue regime been willing to keep to its promises, or to truly negotiate in good faith.  It’s possible the North Koreans are simply using the meeting as a ploy—an opportunity to make “asks” that will be impossible for American negotiators to agree to.

President Trump deserves credit for getting us to this point. But it’s important that he remains vigilant as we approach the murky waters ahead.

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Hugh Hewitt: What to Hope for From a North Korea Summit


President Trump has agreed to go to a summit with the dictator of North Korea, Kim Jung Un. Those who have watched three previous administrations fail to curb the North Korean nuclear program are stunned and wondering out loud what could possibly come of such a meeting.

If Donald Trump comes back with any concessions it will be a major win for his foreign policy even as the destruction of the physical caliphate of ISIS achieved under his watch is in sharp contrast to the fecklessness of the Obama years. We are watching the renewal of a policy of peace through strength, and a key part of that is the massive budget increase passed by Congress earlier this year. After 8 years of appeasement, American power is back and deployed around the globe. It may be enough to bring calm to the Korean peninsula, or it may not work. Either way, it is preferable to the appeasement that marked the Obama years.

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Michael Medved: Hanukkah Affirms History Over Fantasy

Opioid

During the eight-day festival of Hanukkah, it’s worthwhile to connect the holiday to recent controversies surrounding Jerusalem. The joyous holiday celebrates the purification and re-dedication of Jerusalem’s Second Temple in 164 BC, but today the official Palestinian position denies that this Temple ever even existed. That absurd notion not only contradicts hundreds of references in both Old and New Testaments, but also goes against incontrovertible historical and archaeological evidence.

This unbending extremism under-girds Palestinian insistence that Jewish people have no valid claims to any portion of Jerusalem—and their furious reaction to President Trump’s recognition of the Holy City as Israel’s capital. Neither the Trump administration nor the Israeli government rules out the idea that peace negotiations might one day establish a Palestinian capital in some section of Jerusalem.

But until Islamic extremists recognize the region’s actual history and drop the ridiculous fantasy of “Temple Denial,” there can be no progress—and no peace.

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