Tag Archives: Pew Research

David Davenport: The Democrats’ Go Big Or Go Home Problem

Have you noticed the Democrats’ new message? It’s “go big or go home.” Elizabeth Warren says we need “big structural change.” Bernie Sanders agrees, saying no “half measures.” Nearly all the candidates have jumped on the bandwagon, favoring Medicare for all, free college and a massive Green New Deal.

But there’s a problem: Americans don’t trust big government.

A Pew Research study showed that only 17 percent trust government to do what is right. 75 percent believe trust in the federal government is shrinking. A new book titled “Good Enough for Government Work,” argues the American people do not trust government officials, finding their programs inefficient and ineffective.

Republicans should be the party of incremental change. Their climate change ideas about innovation, research and plastic waste are a great example.

According to the American people, the era of big government should be over.

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Michael Medved: A Core Difference Between the Two Parties

An important new survey from Pew Research Center shows core differences between Republicans and Democrats that go far deeper than their contrasting attitudes toward President Trump.

Republicans proved four-times more likely to agree with the statement that the USA “stands above all other countries in the world”—40 percent, compared to just 10 percent among Democrats. As to the opinion that, “other countries are better than the USA,” an astonishing 31 percent of Democrats and 47 percent of young Democrats supported that statement, while only 9 percent of Republicans agreed.

Why should liberals feel more embarrassed about this remarkable nation that dominates the globe—economically, militarily and culturally? A big part of the contrast involves differences in religious involvement, with Democrats much less likely to attend church, or to embrace the nation’s faith-based heritage. That alienation fosters a sense of guilt and victimhood, rather than the pride and gratitude so essential to success at work, in family relationships and in leading a nation.

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Albert Mohler: Dramatic Changes in the American Religious Landscape

The Pew Research Center is out with a sobering new report revealing dramatic changes in the American religious landscape.

The survey from 2018 and 2019 found 65 percent of American adults described themselves as Christians when asked about their religious affiliation. That figure, however, is down 12 percentage points just over the last decade. The share of the population identified as religiously unaffiliated, the nones—n-o-n-e-s—are now at 26 percent. That’s up 17 percent just over the last 10 years.

That’s a tremendous change in just one decade.

Even more alarming is the generational breakdown of the pattern.

The growth of the religiously unaffiliated, “is most pronounced among young adults.” That fact, above all, should have our attention.

We’re witnessing the rapid and accelerating secularization of America.

And the data would indicate no sign that these trends will be slowed, much less reversed.

For the Christian world, the mission field is getting ever closer to home.

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David Davenport: What’s at Stake in the 2018 Elections


435 House and 33 Senate seats.  36 governorships.  6,665 state offices and tens of thousands of local ones.  And you ask what’s at stake in the 2018 elections?

There’s more: important ballot measures like the gas tax in California, carbon emissions in Washington, Medicaid expansion and voting rights.

Beyond the direct effects of your vote lie other questions.  If we split the House and Senate, will anything be passed in the next two years?  Even though Donald Trump is not on the ballot, this election will largely be a referendum on his performance.

It’s embarrassing but, according to the Pew Research Center, voter turnout in the U.S. is only 26th out of 32 democratic countries.

Isn’t there enough at stake for you to vote?  Believe me, this is not a year to be disengaged.  Turn out and do your part.

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Michael Medved: Not as Fragmented as the Pessimists Presume

Opioid

A major study from the Pew Research Center should reassure those of us who worry about the fragmentation of America based on race and ethnicity. Among the 43 million U.S. adults with Hispanic ancestry, a full 5 million don’t identify themselves as “Hispanic” or “Latino” at all.

Moreover, among families who’ve lived in the United States four generations or more—in other words, those with parents and grand-grandparents who are American born—Hispanic identification is only fifty-fifty. This means Latinos follow the familiar pattern of other immigrant groups, like the Irish or Italians, who de-emphasize ethnic identity after several generations in the U.S.

This contrasts with patterns of racial identity, where the great majority of African-Americans still describe themselves as black, even after several centuries in the U.S. Heavy intermarriage plays a big part in the increasingly rapid assimilation of Hispanics: among married third generation Latinos, the big majority—nearly two-thirds, in fact—have a non-Latino spouse.

Perhaps we’re not as fragmented as the pessimists presume.

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Michael Medved: Contrasting Views On Wealth And Poverty

Opioid

A Pew Research study shows sharp contrasts between Republicans and Democrats in attitudes toward wealth and poverty. By more than three-to-one, Republicans say hard work, rather than a person’s advantages, explains why people are rich.

Among Democrats, only 29 percent agree about the value of hard work, while 60 percent say financial success comes from “advantages in life.” In explaining poverty, 56 percent of Republicans cite “lack of effort” but only 19 percent of Democrats agree with them.

Surprisingly, ideology has more influence on attitudes toward wealth and poverty than does current economic status. Nearly a third of low-income respondents admit “lack of effort” explains poverty, while 37 percent of high earners see their good fortune as based on undeserved “advantages in life.”

These results suggest that our approaches toward rich and poor stem more from world-view, values and inclination—rather than current standing or personal experience.

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Michael Medved: Contrasting Views On Wealth And Poverty

Opioid

A Pew Research study shows sharp contrasts between Republicans and Democrats in attitudes toward wealth and poverty. By more than three-to-one, Republicans say hard work, rather than a person’s advantages, explains why people are rich.

Among Democrats, only 29 percent agree about the value of hard work, while 60 percent say financial success comes from “advantages in life.” In explaining poverty, 56 percent of Republicans cite “lack of effort” but only 19 percent of Democrats agree with them.

Surprisingly, ideology has more influence on attitudes toward wealth and poverty than does current economic status. Nearly a third of low-income respondents admit “lack of effort” explains poverty, while 37 percent of high earners see their good fortune as based on undeserved “advantages in life.”

These results suggest that our approaches toward rich and poor stem more from world-view, values and inclination—rather than current standing or personal experience.

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