Tag Archives: Policy

Carol Platt Liebau : A Plea for Fairness

When all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. With no new ideas to address poverty in the wake of the pandemic, left wing politicians are once again calling for tax increases, claiming it’s a matter of “fairness.”

Where were these “pro-fairness” legislators last year, when it was fine to shop at Costco or Wal-Mart, but small businesses were shuttered.

And what about the injustice to our children? Many students haven’t been inside a classroom for almost a year. It’s estimated that existing achievement gaps will be worsened by 15-20 percent because of school shutdowns.

Virtually every major policy chosen to address the pandemic has only empowered government and weakened the individual rights of Americans.

It’s ironic that under the guise of “fairness,” politicians would seek to advance measures that will only expand government still further.

Truly, that’s not fair.

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Michael Medved: Debate Questions for Joe Biden

Joe Biden and his team must prepare to face tough questions in the first presidential debate on September 29.

For instance:
• You’ve supported nationwide demonstrations for racial justice, but would you want them to continue after you’re president? How would you scale down the occasionally violent protests?
• In the primaries, you moved sharply left—on abortion funding, free college, climate policy and more. As president, would you continue that shift as demanded by your party’s progressive wing?
• Did you grow up with “white privilege”—the advantages that purportedly benefit people of European descent? How would you erase such privilege in the future?
• Many Christian and Jewish friends of Israel appreciate the pro-Israel policies of President Trump. Would you build on those policies, or alter them and, if so, how?
• Would you appoint a 78-year-old as a top Cabinet official and, if so, how would you make sure that candidate was up to the job?

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Hugh Hewitt: Congress Must Go Far, Go Big, Go Fast

Senate Republicans must go big and fast in their response to the coronavirus. They are facing choices right now about what sort of economic relief and stimulus package they support in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

The goal is simple: Help those injured in their pocketbooks and provide aid to an economy shuddering under successive shocks of slowdowns and closures.

The biggest impediment to success might be the fact that Capitol Hill staffs don’t turn over much. Longtime Hill workers aren’t exactly the eager recipients of new policy proposals that haven’t been sliced and diced by constituent interest groups.

That has to change. The need is urgent for Congress to go far, go big, go fast. Senate Majority Leader McConnell announced the intention to do just that. He’s going to stay there until it gets done using never tried before ideas.

Time to break the glass and pull the alarm. Time to spend as though you are FDR going to war.

This is no time for business as usual.

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Jerry Bowyer: Paul Volcker and the Lessons of Conservatism

Paul Volcker—the legendary Federal Reserve chair—died early this month on December 8. Volcker fought to restore discipline to monetary policy after the easy money binge of the 70s and the resulting economic stagflation. Left-wing policies led to out-of-control inflation. Volcker made the tough choices—tightening money supply and killing inflation.

This came at the cost of deep economic pain, but Ronald Reagan did not pressure Volcker, focusing instead on tax cuts, persuading the nation to give the policy a chance to work.

Despite the constant economic and political pressure to turn the morphine drip back on, Volcker stayed the course—and annual inflation went from 15 percent all the way down to under 3 percent.

The lesson today is that easy money is not the answer to a flagging economy. Conservatives should take the lesson of Paul Volcker and stick with our principles.

Even when it’s tough.

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Lanhee Chen: The Ascendancy of the Socialist Left

A passing of the torch happened last weekend, when one progressive icon—Bernie Sanders—accepted an endorsement of his campaign from another progressive icon, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Her endorsement came as no surprise to political observers, but heralded an important moment for the ascendancy of far-left wing politics within the Democratic Party. No longer can socialist policy positions be considered the fringes of the American left. Indeed, the movement led by Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez isn’t merely a minor blip in history to be dismissed with the next political cycle. It is the pathway down which the Democrats will take their politics, policymaking, and rhetoric in the years to come.

The ascendancy of the socialist left is a gift to President Trump and Republicans in Congress, who will run as defenders of a free-enterprise system that—while not perfect—has been the linchpin of American prosperity for generations. That’s an electoral fight that will be tough for Democrats to win.

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Hugh Hewitt: China Needs to See U.S. Resolve

Protests have continued in Hong Kong, even as the territory’s Chief Executive Carrie Lam formally withdrew from consideration the bill that would have allowed residents of Hong Kong to be extradited to China for criminal trial.

Yet, just a day earlier, China’s President Xi reiterated his call—as the Wall Street Journal reported—“for a determined fight to overcome any risk or challenge that endangers Communist Party leadership or harms China’s sovereignty and security.”

So, who to believe? What should we expect from Beijing regarding Hong Kong? The only certainty is that the People’s Republic of China is playing the proverbial “long game.”

In response, we need a long-haul policy of containment and coexistence, speaking firmly but without provocation.

Beijing is developing another 100-year strategy.

Our response will require doing more than words. It will require ships and submarines, missiles and planes, and a cyber- and space force.

Is the United States really serious?

Xi is watching what we build, not what we say.

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