Tag Archives: Policy

Lanhee Chen: The Leftward Lurch Continues

The leftward lurch of the Democratic contenders for the presidency continues. The latest idea? California Senator Kamala Harris has called for repeal of the Trump tax cuts. Not some of them. Or just the “tax cuts for the rich.” But all of them.

Millions of middle-income families have benefited from these tax cuts. And our economy is zooming, while unemployment is low and wages are rising. Repealing the Trump tax cuts would imperil the economic progress that we’ve made over the last several years, slowing job creation and threatening to put us back into economic malaise.

Democrats want to raise taxes to pay for their costly social spending plans, like free college tuition and government-run health care. But the tax hikes they are proposing won’t pay for even a fraction of their plans. And their policy proposals look a lot less attractive when you dig beneath the surface.

It’s up to all of us, the voters, to hold them accountable.

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Lanhee Chen: After Mueller: A Look at the 2020 Election

President Trump faces a much clearer pathway to reelection in 2020 now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s found no evidence that the President or the Trump campaign colluded with Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election.

President Trump’s task ahead is to focus his reelection effort on the reasons why voters should give him a second term in office.  And while Democrats continue to obsess over Trump and his alleged misdeeds, it’s up to the President and his team to focus instead on the ways in which they’ve improved the livelihoods of the American people with tangible policy accomplishments.

The President spearheaded tax cuts that have helped many Americans keep more of their hard-earned money; his Administration has cut regulatory burdens and red tape to spur economic growth; and he has appointed judges to federal courts who respect the rule of law and the Constitution.

If President Trump can keep his rhetoric—and his focus—on touting these accomplishments, he’ll go a long way toward winning four more years in the Oval Office.

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Michael Medved: Over-Heated Gun Rhetoric Works Against Reform


If pro-life conservatives ever claimed that supporters of Planned Parenthood had “blood on their hands”, the mainstream media would howl in protest.

Why, then, do anti-gun activists who make precisely such claims about supporters of the NRA draw widespread acclaim for their courage and idealism?

The connection between abortion and killing is obvious—even if you deny that the procedure is equivalent to murder. But there’s no connection between backing gun-rights and endorsing killing. Disagreement over specific policy proposals doesn’t mean that those on the other side want to consign our children to early death or to obliterate our Constitutional rights.

Republican leaders in Washington have already moved ahead with common sense enhancements in our gun regulations but hysterical, polarizing rhetoric only makes constructive reform less likely.

 

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David Davenport: What Kind of Country Wants Media Stars for President?

Compromise

Social media blew up when it appeared that Oprah Winfrey might run for president.  Think of it:  two billionaire media stars who had never held political office running for president. Only in America.

But the deeper question is why voters are turning in this direction?  Besides their obvious frustration with politicians, voters seem more interested in making statements than actually governing. We don’t know what policies Oprah might follow and, even after a year, Trump’s policy approach is still taking shape.  But they do make a statement.

A related problem is that the presidency is becoming all bully pulpit and no real leadership, all hat and no cattle as they say in Texas.  We want superheroes and action, not mature deliberation.  What passes for action in Washington these days is party-line votes and executive orders, not working through complex issues.

Citizens have duties, too, and we shouldn’t vote just to express frustration, but to guide the policy and governance of the nation.

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Michael Medved: The Oprah Infatuation: Dems Place Personality Over Policy

Opioid

The unbounded enthusiasm for Oprah Winfrey’s prospective presidential run illustrates the Democrats’ tendency to prioritize personality above policy. Nobody knows where Oprah stands on issues of the day, or what style of governance she’d favor, but Democrats know she is a popular personality and that’s enough for them. Barack Obama enjoyed similar popularity among Democrats: his brief pre-White House career displayed few practical achievements or even a coherent philosophy, but inspiring speeches about hope and change gave him an almost magical appeal.

In approaching President Trump, of course, Democrats also prefer to ignore substance and to concentrate on style: they emphasize the president’s volatile personality and dismiss his undeniable record of first year accomplishment. Liberals would rather scold the latest presidential tweet than consider the booming economy or the lowest black unemployment rate ever measured. The GOP shouldn’t help them in this effort, but must focus relentlessly on the nation’s pressing issues rather than the president’s personality.

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