Tag Archives: Policy

Lanhee Chen: As the Field Narrows

And then there were ten. That is: Ten Democrats who have qualified to participate in the next presidential primary debate on September 12.

Although the field has narrowed, the candidates’ drift toward far-left progressive policies continues—particularly when it comes to efforts to deal with climate change.

Elizabeth Warren recently unveiled a plan that would spend $3 trillion on government subsidies to combat global warming. Bernie Sanders wants to spend $16 trillion over 15 years, ban fracking for natural gas, and end the import and export of various sources of energy. Kamala Harris has a $10 trillion proposal that would bring what she calls “climate justice” to areas impacted by flooding, heat waves, and shortages in water or food.

Democrats are tripping over themselves to spend more and tax more, all in the name of environmental friendliness. But instead of dealing with climate change thoughtfully, they’re putting forth irresponsible proposals that will damage our economy and ultimately hurt American families working hard to make ends meet.

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Jerry Bowyer: It’s Time to Pivot Back to Pro-Growth Economic Policies

We’ve seen warning signs over the past few months that economic growth is slowing down. Now it’s official: The latest GDP report shows growth in the last quarter at about 2 percent—well below historic averages.

President Trump’s tax cuts kicked in at the beginning of last year. By last summer the economy was booming.

But now the boom’s worn off. The president blames Fed tightening; most economists blame the trade war.

And, it’s hard to ignore the volatility in our policy environment which gives business what it dreads most: huge levels of uncertainty.

There’s a real danger now that the president could enter reelection with a sluggish economy. He should make a hard pivot back to pro-growth policies, leaning on advisors like Larry Kudlow who helped him deliver the boom of 2018.

A growing economy could be the key to delivering a reelection boom for 2020.

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Lanhee Chen: There Is No Such Thing as “Free Health Care”

Massachusetts Senator and Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren has now lost whatever slim chance she had of becoming President. In the first debate between Democratic Party presidential candidates, Warren endorsed the idea of taking away private health insurance from every American who has it, and replacing it with a socialist-style, one-size-fits-all government-run health plan.

Warren will sell her plan for a government takeover of the U.S. health care system as giving more Americans “free health care,” but we all know there’s no such thing. Her ideas would not only be incredibly disruptive to hundreds of millions of Americans, but it could also limit access to doctors and care, slow medical innovation and raise taxes significantly for many across the country.

We shouldn’t be surprised that Elizabeth Warren is embracing socialist-style policies. It’s all part of the leftward lurch of Democrats seeking the presidency. The only question is who will choose to join her next.

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Lanhee Chen: The Leftward Lurch Continues

The leftward lurch of the Democratic contenders for the presidency continues. The latest idea? California Senator Kamala Harris has called for repeal of the Trump tax cuts. Not some of them. Or just the “tax cuts for the rich.” But all of them.

Millions of middle-income families have benefited from these tax cuts. And our economy is zooming, while unemployment is low and wages are rising. Repealing the Trump tax cuts would imperil the economic progress that we’ve made over the last several years, slowing job creation and threatening to put us back into economic malaise.

Democrats want to raise taxes to pay for their costly social spending plans, like free college tuition and government-run health care. But the tax hikes they are proposing won’t pay for even a fraction of their plans. And their policy proposals look a lot less attractive when you dig beneath the surface.

It’s up to all of us, the voters, to hold them accountable.

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Lanhee Chen: After Mueller: A Look at the 2020 Election

President Trump faces a much clearer pathway to reelection in 2020 now that Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s found no evidence that the President or the Trump campaign colluded with Russian efforts to influence the 2016 presidential election.

President Trump’s task ahead is to focus his reelection effort on the reasons why voters should give him a second term in office.  And while Democrats continue to obsess over Trump and his alleged misdeeds, it’s up to the President and his team to focus instead on the ways in which they’ve improved the livelihoods of the American people with tangible policy accomplishments.

The President spearheaded tax cuts that have helped many Americans keep more of their hard-earned money; his Administration has cut regulatory burdens and red tape to spur economic growth; and he has appointed judges to federal courts who respect the rule of law and the Constitution.

If President Trump can keep his rhetoric—and his focus—on touting these accomplishments, he’ll go a long way toward winning four more years in the Oval Office.

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Michael Medved: Over-Heated Gun Rhetoric Works Against Reform


If pro-life conservatives ever claimed that supporters of Planned Parenthood had “blood on their hands”, the mainstream media would howl in protest.

Why, then, do anti-gun activists who make precisely such claims about supporters of the NRA draw widespread acclaim for their courage and idealism?

The connection between abortion and killing is obvious—even if you deny that the procedure is equivalent to murder. But there’s no connection between backing gun-rights and endorsing killing. Disagreement over specific policy proposals doesn’t mean that those on the other side want to consign our children to early death or to obliterate our Constitutional rights.

Republican leaders in Washington have already moved ahead with common sense enhancements in our gun regulations but hysterical, polarizing rhetoric only makes constructive reform less likely.

 

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