Tag Archives: politics

David Davenport: Impeachment Is an Extraordinary Remedy

In the first 175 years of the nation, the House of Representatives impeached only one president, Andrew Johnson. Now in the last 57 years, it’s impeached two, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton, and it may be ready to impeach a third.

Why the rise in impeachments? Because we forget that impeachment is extraordinary. The normal way to remove a president is by the people through elections. The extraordinary way is impeachment, with its Constitutional requirement of “high crimes and misdemeanors.” Lacking political patience, we threaten to make the extraordinary now ordinary.

Politics is an ugly business. Quid pro quos in foreign policy? They doubtless happen more than we think and, if we don’t like them, we have a chance to cast our vote in one year. But a case of high crimes and misdemeanors demanding an extraordinary remedy?

I think not.

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Lanhee Chen: The Ascendancy of the Socialist Left

A passing of the torch happened last weekend, when one progressive icon—Bernie Sanders—accepted an endorsement of his campaign from another progressive icon, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Her endorsement came as no surprise to political observers, but heralded an important moment for the ascendancy of far-left wing politics within the Democratic Party. No longer can socialist policy positions be considered the fringes of the American left. Indeed, the movement led by Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez isn’t merely a minor blip in history to be dismissed with the next political cycle. It is the pathway down which the Democrats will take their politics, policymaking, and rhetoric in the years to come.

The ascendancy of the socialist left is a gift to President Trump and Republicans in Congress, who will run as defenders of a free-enterprise system that—while not perfect—has been the linchpin of American prosperity for generations. That’s an electoral fight that will be tough for Democrats to win.

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Jerry Bowyer: A Tax Change the President Should Embrace

Bloomberg News and CNBC report that the Trump administration is seriously considering a rule change which would stop the IRS from taxing investors based on phantom gains from inflation.

Let’s say you buy an investment for a hundred dollars and sell it a few years later for 105 dollars, but inflation was 5 percent. You didn’t really make any money. In real purchasing power, you just broke even.

The way the system works now, you’d have to pay taxes on that five dollars. That’s not taxing income; that’s confiscating wealth.

Larry Kudlow, now the president’s chief economic advisor has long been a champion of the idea, and it looks like the president is on board. And: It looks like the president can do this without buy-in from Congress.

We should hope the president embraces this idea and moves forward with it.

It’s good economics—and it would be good politics as well.

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Michael Medved: Motivated by the Destructive Power of Politics


A new poll from the Wall Street Journal and NBC News shows Americans are slightly schizophrenic in their attitude toward politics. More people than ever before say they’re interested, even absorbed, with the politics of the moment, but less than a third believe in government’s power to address “long term challenges.”

An amazing 87 percent say “politics is important to them” — that’s three times the percentage expressing similar sentiment in 1990.

Why are people so intrigued when they have so little confidence that our leaders can solve problems?

It could be that they’re afraid of government’s destructive potential, worrying more about its capacity to hurt than they hope for its ability to help. Another poll from Pew Research shows 85 percent agree that “the tone and nature of political debate” has become more negative in recent years, and any honest observer should recognize the depressing, downward trajectory.

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Michael Medved: Problems Beyond Politics

I’m sure I’m not alone in knowing several families that are prosperous, hard-working and deeply religious and yet lose children to the world of drugs, out-of-wedlock birth, welfare dependence and hopelessness.

It’s also increasingly common to see solidly middle-class couples who, after 20 or 30 years of seemingly successful marriage, suddenly break up, causing pain to themselves, their children and even their grandchildren. In spite of a booming economy and increased opportunity, so-called “deaths of despair”—through suicide, alcoholism or drug overdoses—have reached unprecedented levels.

This explains the seeming disconnect between our prevailing prosperity and the big majorities who believe America’s on the wrong track for our future.

The essential problem involves the collapse of family life, and with neither liberals nor conservatives addressing the issue in meaningful ways, our politics seems to offer only a sideshow rather than a solution.

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Hugh Hewitt and NYT Columnist David Brooks on “The Second Mountain”

Hugh Hewitt invites David Brooks, Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, and author of The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Lifeto share insights from his book. Brooks shares how in our disconnected culture the only way to build authentic relationships is to be vulnerable. In the book, Brooks does just that. He offers a very honest and candid look into his life, his faith, and his family. Setting aside the tribalistic nature of politics, Brooks shares that our life is about our relationships, our character, how well we love, the things we love, and how well we treat our neighbor.

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