Tag Archives: politics

Hugh Hewitt and NYT Columnist David Brooks on “The Second Mountain”

Hugh Hewitt invites David Brooks, Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times, and author of The Second Mountain: The Quest for a Moral Lifeto share insights from his book. Brooks shares how in our disconnected culture the only way to build authentic relationships is to be vulnerable. In the book, Brooks does just that. He offers a very honest and candid look into his life, his faith, and his family. Setting aside the tribalistic nature of politics, Brooks shares that our life is about our relationships, our character, how well we love, the things we love, and how well we treat our neighbor.

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Michael Medved: Gina Haspel Punished for Loyal Service?


Gina Haspel has been selected by President Trump as the new Director of the Central Intelligence Agency after serving the agency effectively for 32 years, under two Democratic and four Republican presidents.

But Democrats still oppose her confirmation because CIA policy after 9/11 called for enhanced interrogation techniques and she followed her orders in executing that policy. After Congress pressed to eliminate tactics like water-boarding, she accepted that decision too, and executed it without complaint.

For Democrats, in other words, it’s her loyal service to the agency, under both Republican and Democratic leadership, that disqualifies Haspel.

In fighting this patriotic, richly qualified nominee the Democrats are placing political gamesmanship ahead of national security.

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Owen Strachan: Let’s Treat All Women With Respect


Here are the rules today: you must be pro-woman at all times—unless, that is, the woman you’re engaging is conservative or religious.

We saw an example of this cultural double-standard at this past weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner. This dinner has a history of friendly banter. But comedian Michelle Wolf crossed the line. Even as she joked about abortion, she attacked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, making fun of her looks, and repeatedly called her a liar.

Whatever our political differences, let’s be clear: this kind of public abuse is reprehensible. It’s especially shocking because supposedly we’re in a tolerant age that prizes diversity.

In practice, it seems, some people deserve respect, fairness and kindness.

And some don’t.

This is the strangest of ages. When a woman is conservative or religious, you can say whatever you want.

I have a better idea: Let’s treat all women with respect.

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Michael Medved: “Chappaquiddick”: A Powerful Reminder of Arrogance and Corruption


The new film “Chappaquiddick” depicts a searing scandal that changed the course of political history. As the only surviving brother in a storied dynasty, 37-year-old Senator Ted Kennedy looked like a sure bet for the Presidency in the Summer of 1969. But after leaving a boozy party with a 28-year-old female passenger, he drove his car off a bridge.

Inexplicably, he waited more than 9 hours before notifying local authorities who might have rescued the trapped young woman. The film highlights backstage manipulations, involving some of the nation’s most powerful figures, that rushed the victim’s burial without autopsy and treated Ted’s political survival as their all-important goal.

For those disgusted by today’s tawdry politics, “Chappaquiddick” provides a powerful reminder that corruption and arrogance have long afflicted American public life.

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Michael Medved: Why Democrats Are Suddenly Unforgiving Moralists


An Economist/YouGov poll asks respondents if they’d back “a presidential candidate who has done immoral acts in private life.”

A full 48 percent of Republicans find it acceptable, but only 19 percent of Democrats agree.  After three-decades of Democratic infatuation with the profoundly imperfect Bill and Hillary, this counts as a shock.

Yes, these attitudes reflect the polarized response to the current incumbent but other factors make the GOP less judgmental than the stereotype. More common identification with religion helps Republicans see “immoral acts in private” as nearly universal, so they pick the most capable sinner.

It’s liberals who view politics as life’s highest calling, while conservatives look askance at politicians in general, while feeling ready to trade a bit of private imperfection for a lot of public competence.

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Michael Medved: Partisanship Trumps Policy in Reacting to North Korea


Reactions to White House plans to meet with Kim Jong-Un highlight the damaging impact of partisan polarization and obsessive Trump hatred.

Had Barack Obama arranged to negotiate with the brutal North Korean dictator, some of the same Democrats now deriding Trump would have hailed their hero as a bold visionary, deserving of a second Nobel prize.

Some of the voices that blamed Trump for incendiary rhetoric leading toward needless war now attack him for reckless concessions in pursuit of peace. Of course, this new initiative could still collapse in a U.S. setback, but Americans should give the president broad support to strengthen his hand. Yes, Trump true-believers can sometimes embarrass themselves by claiming the president can do no wrong, but his die-hard critics damage our politics by insisting that he can do no right.

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