Tag Archives: poverty

David Davenport: Localism Still Alive, Even in California

In a move with national implications, the California legislature halted a bill to force local governments to increase housing density. Think multiple homes on single lots and apartment buildings near transit centers.

It was a battle between Governor Gavin Newsom and Democrats on one side addressing a housing crisis, and California residents who had bought into their California dream communities on the other. Above all, it was a question of local control.

Liberals said there was no time to debate or compromise, this was a crisis. Everything in government is now wars and emergencies: Wars on poverty, crime, drugs, terror and 31 states of national emergency. We need action now.

Finally, a few Democrats who represented suburban districts said let’s take more time with this, seek something less extreme, find a compromise.

Good for them. Localism is still alive, even in California.

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David Davenport: What a National Emergency Actually Means

Few Americans realize that they currently live under some 30 states of national emergency, the oldest declared by President Jimmy Carter during the Iran hostage crisis 40 years ago. Actual emergencies come and go but emergency declarations live on.

The primary effect of a national emergency is to shift power from Congress to the president, as President Trump wanted to build his wall. Along with executive orders and domestic policy wars on poverty, crime, drugs and terror, presidents since Lyndon Johnson have been moving power from one end of Pennsylvania Avenue to the other.

But politically, it’s a two-edged sword. When presidents seek to do things unilaterally, these actions are easily canceled and replaced by the next president. Perhaps you recall how quickly President Trump undid President Obama’s executive orders.

One day Congress will wake up and notice its primary powers are lost.

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Michael Medved: Contrasting Views On Wealth And Poverty

Opioid

A Pew Research study shows sharp contrasts between Republicans and Democrats in attitudes toward wealth and poverty. By more than three-to-one, Republicans say hard work, rather than a person’s advantages, explains why people are rich.

Among Democrats, only 29 percent agree about the value of hard work, while 60 percent say financial success comes from “advantages in life.” In explaining poverty, 56 percent of Republicans cite “lack of effort” but only 19 percent of Democrats agree with them.

Surprisingly, ideology has more influence on attitudes toward wealth and poverty than does current economic status. Nearly a third of low-income respondents admit “lack of effort” explains poverty, while 37 percent of high earners see their good fortune as based on undeserved “advantages in life.”

These results suggest that our approaches toward rich and poor stem more from world-view, values and inclination—rather than current standing or personal experience.

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Michael Medved: Defying the “Success Sequence”

Opioid

The New York Times recently acknowledged that some of the recent changes in marriage and childbearing have damaged our country. Noting that a big majority—55 percent—of first children born to millennial couples are now born outside of marriage, columnist David Leonhardt explained that this “new normal” violates the “success sequence” established long-ago by the Brookings Institution.

That research proved that young people, whatever their background, could minimize any chance of long-term poverty by taking thee simple steps: graduating from high school, getting a job—any job—right after graduation from high school or college, and bearing children only after marriage, not before.

The success sequence shows that good choices can help all people avoid bad outcomes, even if they’re disadvantaged, while bad choices are likely to produce bad outcomes, even for the more privileged. Welcoming children in their traditional context of marital commitment will benefit those children, their parents and society at large.

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Michael Medved: Contrasting Views On Wealth And Poverty

Opioid

A Pew Research study shows sharp contrasts between Republicans and Democrats in attitudes toward wealth and poverty. By more than three-to-one, Republicans say hard work, rather than a person’s advantages, explains why people are rich.

Among Democrats, only 29 percent agree about the value of hard work, while 60 percent say financial success comes from “advantages in life.” In explaining poverty, 56 percent of Republicans cite “lack of effort” but only 19 percent of Democrats agree with them.

Surprisingly, ideology has more influence on attitudes toward wealth and poverty than does current economic status. Nearly a third of low-income respondents admit “lack of effort” explains poverty, while 37 percent of high earners see their good fortune as based on undeserved “advantages in life.”

These results suggest that our approaches toward rich and poor stem more from world-view, values and inclination—rather than current standing or personal experience.

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