Tag Archives: protest

Hugh Hewitt: With Hope That We’ll See “The Better Angels of our Nature” As 2021 Unfolds

“Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection.” Many of you will recognize those calming, moderating words from Lincoln’s first inaugural.

Such moderation has been largely missing from our public discourse in recent years.

When Trump supporters gathered in D.C. this week for the “Stop the Steal” protest, it’s hard to imagine that more than a tiny fraction intended violence. But some surely did.

And I don’t believe the president intended the riot. It has done him great damage. He ought to have seen the potential of violence. As it unfolded, he ought to have been quick to condemn it. In condemning it, he should have done so without any mention of his own grievances.

Our leaders ought to calm and not inflame.

Let’s hope and pray that we’ll see—Lincoln’s words again—“the better angels of our nature” as this new year unfolds.

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Violent Protestors Breach the Capitol


Townhall Review for January 9, 2021

Hugh Hewitt talks with Arkansas Senator Tom Cotton about the protest near the Capitol that turned into a riot.

Hugh Hewitt and former Missouri Senator Jim Talent talk about what caused the violent protest at the Capitol building.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Eliana Johnson, of the Washington Free Beacon, about the Democrat agenda now that they control Congress and the White House.

Hugh Hewitt talks with Wisconsin Congressman Mike Gallagher about what happened in the Senate run off race in Georgia.

Seth Leibsohn and Dr. Donald Siegel, author of the article titled “Pandemic Response is Our Vietnam”, talk about the way government uses statistics to keep us engaged.

Kevin McCullough talks with Dr. Ben Carson, Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, about the pandemic’s effects and healthcare.

Charlie Kirk talks about Vice President-elect Kamala Harris and the “fudging” of her resume and other tales.

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Owen Strachan: Terrible Ideas Have Terrible Consequences

The tremendous violence in America migrated to an unlikely setting recently: The typically quiet city of Kenosha, Wisconsin. According to the Kenosha police department, out of 175 people arrested recently, 102 had a home address outside Kenosha, hailing from no less than 44 different cities.

What this means is that our cities are being torn apart by what amounts to a professional rioting class. These “protesters” are not merely upset; they are not merely decrying what they see as injustices. Those of the rioting class are genuine radicals—believing, per Critical Race Theory—that America is built upon a racist foundation. “White supremacy” represents the structure of this country, and so to cleanse America of it, American civilization must be torn down and rebuilt.

We are not merely witnessing “outrage” today. We are witnessing a focused attack on the fabric of America.

Terrible ideas have terrible consequences.

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Michael Medved: “Peaceful Protest” Is a Contradiction in Terms

The mainstream media reflexively praise the civil unrest afflicting major cities across the country, using the term “peaceful protest,” without even acknowledging that the phrase is an obvious contradiction in terms. A picnic can be peaceful. A yoga conclave can be peaceful.

But a protest cannot—its very purpose is disturbing the peace, shattering calm and complacency, heightening tension and conflict, not resolving it. Dictionary definitions for the word “peaceful” are, number one, “peaceable”, and number two, “untroubled by conflict, agitation or commotion; quiet, tranquil.”

There’s nothing quiet or tranquil about what’s going on today. Yes, protests can be non-violent—Dr. King and the late John Lewis always stressed non-violence, even in the face of violent provocation. But the current demonstrations emphasize no positive goals or programs of reform, amounting only to angry expressions of unfocused rage. Naturally, there’s nothing “peaceful” in this process—a process which, in most cases, leads inevitably to violent destruction.

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Hong Kong National Security Law Penalizes Protest

A sweeping new national security law has gone into effect in Hong Kong, effectively ending the “one country, two systems” promise that had long governed its relationship with mainland China. The new law cements China’s authoritarian rule over Hong Kong and limits many freedoms of the people there.

For example, the law criminalizes a number of protest activities in Hong Kong, if they are directed at the Chinese Communist Party or the Chinese government. It also sets up a unit within the Hong Kong Police Force that has the power to search properties and perform warrantless, covert surveillance—all while using security personnel from the mainland.

We’ve gotten used to scenes of democratic protestors in the streets of Hong Kong, fighting for their rights and freedoms. Such scenes are now unlikely, given the severe penalties that the Chinese government will impose on many such activities.

It’s the sad end of an era in Hong Kong. The Chinese government’s actions demonstrate they are committed to hegemonic control of their neighborhood.

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Michael Medved: The Left’s Fanatical Substitute for Faith

In late April, hundreds of Orthodox Jews gathered for the funeral of a beloved Chassidic rabbi, but New York’s mayor deemed their rites “absolutely unacceptable” and threatened mass arrests if it happened again.

A month later, tens of thousands of angry, often violent protestors, rallied for Black Lives Matter but the same mayor encouraged them, boasting of his own daughter’s participation. Simultaneously, 1,300 medical and public health professionals who had previously advocated strict social distancing, signed a statement in support of mass demonstrations and, idiotically, called them “vital to the national public health.”

This ludicrous, illogical switch demonstrates that so-called “social justice activism” has become a substitute religion for secular progressives—with its own saints, martyrs and intolerant, unassailable creed. In this replacement faith, the holiest sacrament is public protest—not because it achieves anything practical but because it amounts to a form of self-destructive, fanatical, secular worship.

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