Tag Archives: protest

Michael Medved: “Peaceful Protest” Is a Contradiction in Terms

The mainstream media reflexively praise the civil unrest afflicting major cities across the country, using the term “peaceful protest,” without even acknowledging that the phrase is an obvious contradiction in terms. A picnic can be peaceful. A yoga conclave can be peaceful.

But a protest cannot—its very purpose is disturbing the peace, shattering calm and complacency, heightening tension and conflict, not resolving it. Dictionary definitions for the word “peaceful” are, number one, “peaceable”, and number two, “untroubled by conflict, agitation or commotion; quiet, tranquil.”

There’s nothing quiet or tranquil about what’s going on today. Yes, protests can be non-violent—Dr. King and the late John Lewis always stressed non-violence, even in the face of violent provocation. But the current demonstrations emphasize no positive goals or programs of reform, amounting only to angry expressions of unfocused rage. Naturally, there’s nothing “peaceful” in this process—a process which, in most cases, leads inevitably to violent destruction.

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Hong Kong National Security Law Penalizes Protest

A sweeping new national security law has gone into effect in Hong Kong, effectively ending the “one country, two systems” promise that had long governed its relationship with mainland China. The new law cements China’s authoritarian rule over Hong Kong and limits many freedoms of the people there.

For example, the law criminalizes a number of protest activities in Hong Kong, if they are directed at the Chinese Communist Party or the Chinese government. It also sets up a unit within the Hong Kong Police Force that has the power to search properties and perform warrantless, covert surveillance—all while using security personnel from the mainland.

We’ve gotten used to scenes of democratic protestors in the streets of Hong Kong, fighting for their rights and freedoms. Such scenes are now unlikely, given the severe penalties that the Chinese government will impose on many such activities.

It’s the sad end of an era in Hong Kong. The Chinese government’s actions demonstrate they are committed to hegemonic control of their neighborhood.

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Michael Medved: The Left’s Fanatical Substitute for Faith

In late April, hundreds of Orthodox Jews gathered for the funeral of a beloved Chassidic rabbi, but New York’s mayor deemed their rites “absolutely unacceptable” and threatened mass arrests if it happened again.

A month later, tens of thousands of angry, often violent protestors, rallied for Black Lives Matter but the same mayor encouraged them, boasting of his own daughter’s participation. Simultaneously, 1,300 medical and public health professionals who had previously advocated strict social distancing, signed a statement in support of mass demonstrations and, idiotically, called them “vital to the national public health.”

This ludicrous, illogical switch demonstrates that so-called “social justice activism” has become a substitute religion for secular progressives—with its own saints, martyrs and intolerant, unassailable creed. In this replacement faith, the holiest sacrament is public protest—not because it achieves anything practical but because it amounts to a form of self-destructive, fanatical, secular worship.

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Albert Mohler: The Preconditions for Constructive Political Change

The widespread rioting and looting we’ve witnessed in the wake of George Floyd’s death at the hands of a Minneapolis police officer highlight the need for stability and trust in the achievement of justice.

In the United States, the act of political protest has often led to constructive political change, but rioting never has. And the more widespread and the more violent the rioting, the more negative the political effects have been over time.

The United States Constitution guarantees citizens the right to a redress of grievances.

But there are preconditions that are necessary—the first is a stable order in which justice can actually take place. The second is the kind of trust, social trust, that is necessary for any effort at achieving even approximate justice.

If you take out stability, if you eliminate order, and if you erode social trust, the accomplishment of justice becomes well-nigh impossible.

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Albert Mohler: Law and Order and the Death of George Floyd

The video of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis, held down by a police officer in an arrest with his knee on the back of his neck resulted—as we now know—in his tragic death.

Commenting on the video, Art Acevedo, who is the head of the Major Cities Chiefs Association said, “I haven’t heard anybody justify this.”

The sad reality is that George Floyd is now dead.

When you look at the protests and rioting in Minneapolis, it is an ugly picture everywhere you look—and now not just in Minneapolis.

But where does this story lead?

It all comes down to the importance of the rule of law. If the rule of law breaks down, there is no rescue.

Injustice documented before our eyes cries out for justice, but justice calls out for the rule of law—in the courtroom and on the streets of America’s cities.

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