Tag Archives: Religion

Michael Medved: The Key Lesson of the D-Day Prayer

On the night of June 6, 1944, President Franklin Roosevelt spoke on the radio to announce the initial success of the D-Day invasion.

“Almighty God,” he began, urging the nation to join him in prayer. “Our sons, pride of our Nation, this day have set upon a mighty endeavor, a struggle to preserve our Republic, our religion, and our civilization, and to set free a suffering humanity.”

President Trump read those words 75 years later to commemorate the occasion.

Liberal hero though he was, FDR defined part of the war’s goal as defending “our religion.” He didn’t deny the crucial Protestant-Catholic divide, or ignore the presence in the ranks thousands of Jews and other non-Christians.

But Roosevelt’s words strongly implied a shared faith in America as an instrument of divine Providence “to set free a suffering humanity.” In today’s turmoil, may Americans rediscover that sense of common purpose.

Read More »

Albert Mohler: Even More Secular Than We Knew


One of the most well-documented irrefutable trends of our times is the continued secularization of Western societies. A new study has come out about young people in Europe indicating that the future may be even more secular than we knew.

Commenting on the report, Steven Bullivant of St. Mary’s University in London says,

“With some notable exceptions, young adults increasingly are not identifying with or practicing religion. Christianity as a default, as a norm, is gone and probably gone for good or at least for the next 100 years.”

In the United States, we are ourselves looking at a speeded up velocity of this secularization, due to the political and moral change in the coming generations of the millennials and those identified now as Generation Z.

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: Larry Kudlow the God Question


Larry Kudlow has been subject to unending attacks from the mainstream media since being announced as Trump’s chief economic advisor.

Kudlow is a devout Catholic who credits God for getting him through his years of substance abuse. On CNBC, Kudlow said that, whatever might happen during his tenure as Trump’s advisor, it would be the will of God. This sentiment isn’t actually controversial, but on their MSNBC show, Ali Velshi and Stephanie Ruhle found it worthy of incredulous laughter and snide sarcasm.

Velshi used to work for Al Jazeera—if someone there had said inshallah (God’s will) no one at MSNBC would have dreamed of treating them with such contempt!

Kudlow is a fine conservative economist and will serve the president well.

And his faith should be off limits.

Read More »

The True Story of the Pilgrims and Thanksgiving

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — November 18, 2017
This special edition of the Townhall Review features Michael Medved telling the compelling true story of the Pilgrims and Thanksgiving: why they left Europe, how they made their way across the ocean, and how they fought to survive in the New World while preserving their religious devotion to God.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Evangelicals for Trump: A Matter of Self Defense

Opioid

The sharpest divisions in politics today aren’t based on race or economic status, but on religion. Last year’s exit polls showed 26 percent who described themselves as Evangelical Christians, and they preferred Donald Trump by a crushing margin of 81 to 16 percent.

Among the rest of the electorate—the 74 percent who said they were NOT evangelical or born-again—Hillary won a landslide, 60 to 34 percent.

Why the difference, when few fervent Christians viewed Trump as a paragon of virtue, or a person of deep faith?

The answer involves pervasive fear about threats to religious liberty—with people of faith alarmed at attacks on individuals, businesses and even religious organizations that espouse politically incorrect views on same sex marriage, abortion, or public prayer. Unless liberals begin standing up for religious liberty and freedom of conscience, and stop treating religious believers as the enemy, people of faith will continue to swing elections to the GOP as a matter of self-defense.

 

Read More »

Michael Medved: Four Hopeful Lessons From an Epic Catastrophe

Opioid

As Texas begins the long process of recovery from the catastrophe of Hurricane Harvey, Americans across the country should embrace four important lessons:

First, let’s acknowledge that government isn’t always the enemy—and in emergencies like this one, government at the local, state and federal levels has a crucial, life-saving role to play.

Second, we see that government alone isn’t enough—private businesses, and countless individual volunteers proved indispensable for rescue and recovery.

Third, in times of crisis our various divisions—racial, political, religious—matter less than we thought. No one asked rescuers or the rescued about political affiliation or ethnic background when lives were at stake.

Finally, the country can put aside its passionate disagreements, and work together when it’s necessary, as we strive to return to normal life.

And yes, after Harvey, we’re reminded that normal life—whatever its shortcomings and frustrations—is worth defending and even cherishing in this phenomenally fortunate nation.

 

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/340339273″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

 

Read More »