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Tag Archives: religious

Owen Strachan: Let’s Treat All Women With Respect


Here are the rules today: you must be pro-woman at all times—unless, that is, the woman you’re engaging is conservative or religious.

We saw an example of this cultural double-standard at this past weekend’s White House Correspondents’ Dinner. This dinner has a history of friendly banter. But comedian Michelle Wolf crossed the line. Even as she joked about abortion, she attacked White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, making fun of her looks, and repeatedly called her a liar.

Whatever our political differences, let’s be clear: this kind of public abuse is reprehensible. It’s especially shocking because supposedly we’re in a tolerant age that prizes diversity.

In practice, it seems, some people deserve respect, fairness and kindness.

And some don’t.

This is the strangest of ages. When a woman is conservative or religious, you can say whatever you want.

I have a better idea: Let’s treat all women with respect.

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Albert Mohler: California and the Future of Religious Liberty

The California Assembly has yet again adopted legislation that makes an undeniable infringement on religious liberty.  Assembly Bill 2943 would make it fraudulent and illegal to offer in any way to have anything to do with a change in sexual orientation, or for that matter, an individual’s sexual identity.

The Alliance Defending Freedom says, “the breadth of this censorship is staggering.” David French at National Review described it as, “extraordinarily radical.”

Part of the radical nature of this legislation is the fact that it now elevates sexual identity to something that is beyond question.  In other words, those who are pushing for the moral revolution, especially on LGBT issues, are setting out to eradicate, even by force of coercive law, anyone who would represent any worldview that would stand in their way.

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Albert Mohler: The True History Of The Holiday

Billy Graham

As Americans prepare to celebrate Thanksgiving Day, it’s a good time to be reminded about the true history of the holiday.

Perhaps we should not be surprised that in an increasingly secular America, there’s confusion about the origins of Thanksgiving. Some kids are now taught that the Pilgrims held a feast to thank the Indians. Afraid of appearing too religious, some are now calling it “Turkey Day,” as if it all comes down to poultry.

The facts speak for themselves: In 1621, the Pilgrims celebrated “the goodness of God” as they feasted with local Indians. In 1789 President Washington declared the first national day of Thanksgiving—asking Americans to “unite in most humbly offering our prayer and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations.”

So much for a secular holiday. These Americans knew to whom they were praying.

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Albert Mohler: Thoughts And Prayers

Headlines

In the wake of tragedy, we are accustomed to hearing calls for “ thoughts and prayers.” We have heard them from prominent political figures, both Democrats and Republicans. But more recently, such calls have drawn harsh criticism from the Left.

What does it mean when a political leader says that the nation’s “ thoughts and prayers ” are with those who are in sorrow and grief? It could mean nothing. It could be a quick way of moving on without meaning to do anything.

Or it could be an expression of what is called “civil religion,” the common spiritual language of the American people. Robert Bellah, a sociologist at the University of California at Berkeley, famously argued that “every nation and every people come to some form of religious self-understanding whether the critics like it or not.”

Some critics clearly do not like it. Nevertheless, expressions of civil religion are necessary for a president of the United States — any president — who must lead the nation, sometimes as mourner in chief.

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Michael Medved: Four Hopeful Lessons From an Epic Catastrophe

Opioid

As Texas begins the long process of recovery from the catastrophe of Hurricane Harvey, Americans across the country should embrace four important lessons:

First, let’s acknowledge that government isn’t always the enemy—and in emergencies like this one, government at the local, state and federal levels has a crucial, life-saving role to play.

Second, we see that government alone isn’t enough—private businesses, and countless individual volunteers proved indispensable for rescue and recovery.

Third, in times of crisis our various divisions—racial, political, religious—matter less than we thought. No one asked rescuers or the rescued about political affiliation or ethnic background when lives were at stake.

Finally, the country can put aside its passionate disagreements, and work together when it’s necessary, as we strive to return to normal life.

And yes, after Harvey, we’re reminded that normal life—whatever its shortcomings and frustrations—is worth defending and even cherishing in this phenomenally fortunate nation.

 

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