Tag Archives: Republican

Michael Medved: Minor Parties Play the Wild Card

The five presidential elections of the 21st Century have established a clear pattern of close battles between evenly matched parties—a pattern charismatic candidates and billions in spending can’t seem to break.

Republican nominees have all won similar popular vote percentages, ranging from 51 percent for George W. Bush in 2004, to 46 percent for both John McCain and Donald Trump.

Democrats draw similar support—between Obama’s 53 percent in 2008 and Hillary’s 48 percent last time.

What changes more significantly from election to election is the vote for minor party candidates, which soared to 6 percent in 2016, more than triple their combined percentage in 2008 and 2012. If Howard Schultz runs a third party campaign, and protest candidates draw a total of 7 million votes as they did last time, President Trump is almost certain to benefit.

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Michael Medved: The Key Three Will Determine Everything

Democrats won’t repeat their huge mistake of 2016—focusing on the popular vote and national polling while ignoring crucial mechanics of the Electoral College.

To unseat Trump, the Democrats must flip at least three of the nine crucial swing states Trump won last time. Now that won’t be easy, with perennial battlegrounds Ohio and Florida trending in a strongly Republican direction.

Instead, Democrats will concentrate on three heartland pick-ups: Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.

In all three states, Republicans fared very badly in 2018, losing Senate and governor’s races. Trump needs to hold just one of these three keystones and he’ll win: even if Democrats take both Michigan and Pennsylvania—the two larger prizes of the “key three”—Trump still gets 270 and wins the presidency by a single electoral vote.

Look for another close, fierce, fight to the finish!

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Jerry Bowyer: The Challenges Presented by Full Employment

Critics of the Republican tax reform package argue that it benefited Wall Street and the ultra-wealthy but not Main Street and the middle class. But recent data show that this is almost exactly the opposite of the truth.

Though the large stock indices are up slightly since the implementation of the tax cut at the beginning of 2018, the real effects of the cuts have been felt in massive job creation.

The latest employment report showed over 300k jobs created in just one month. The latest jobs opening report showed that for the first time in the history of this statistic, there are more job openings than job seekers.

As the tax cut was working its way through Congress, I warned that America’s employment problem was about to go from a labor glut to a labor shortage.

That’s where we are now—at full employment. The next challenge is getting people ready for those jobs.

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Michael Medved and Pete Peterson on Conservative Thought Amidst Pervasive Leftist Academia


Michael Medved and Pete Peterson, the Dean of the Graduate School of Public Policy at Pepperdine University, on how the 2018 midterm election shows the trend away from conservatism, especially among college graduates, and what can be done to prepare leaders who can speak across the aisle.

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Assad Threatens Again; Obama Reenters the Stage


Townhall Review – September 15, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and Congressman Mike Gallagher take a look at the crisis in Syria, with Assad threatening to use chemical weapons. Michael Medved questions the importance of the anonymous New York Times op-ed that Democrats are salivating over. Mark Davis comments on former President Obama breaking past-president protocol, publicly criticizing the current President and the Republican Party. Google’s CEO snubs the U.S. Senate, ignoring a request to talk about media censorship. Dennis Prager and Louisiana Senator Bill Cassidy discuss the media bias against Prager University. Michael Medved’s guest, John Bozzella, President and CEO of Global Automakers, says recent tariffs imposed by President Trump are causing auto prices to soar. Hugh Hewitt talks with Ken Starr, who’s Special Counsel work lead to President Clinton’s impeachment, about the likelihood of Trump’s impeachment. Dennis Prager and his producer Allen Estrin discuss President Trump’s phone call with Jewish leaders in media and politics.

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American Foreign Policy After the Iran Deal


Townhall Review – July 28, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and New York Times columnist, Bret Stephens, talk about Iran’s latest threats to the United States following President Trump’s decision to pull out of the Iran Nuclear Deal. Hugh Hewitt and Rep. Mike Gallagher discuss President Trump’s recent speech on upgrading the U.S. military. Phil Cowan and Jonathan Keller of the California Family Counsel discuss the postponement of California AB2943. Dennis Prager and Kimberly Strassel of the Wall Street Journal look at the latest developments in the “Russian Collusion” investigation. Michael Medved looks at how the Democrats flirting with Democratic Socialism might affect Republican chances in the midterm election. Michael Medved examines the impact foolish social media posts or stupid comments from long ago might cause some good, talented people to not seek public office. Mike Gallagher invites former press secretary Sean Spicer to look back at his career in his new book, The Briefing.

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Lanhee Chen: An Alliance Worth Defending


There’s been a lot of talk recently about whether NATO—an alliance started after World War II—is still relevant in today’s world.  The answer is a simple and unequivocal “yes.” It is.

The alliance is on the front lines of our efforts to counteract Russia’s growing ambitions in Europe and beyond.  But NATO does need to evolve, to meet the growing threats of the 21st century. It should be oriented, for example, toward efforts to counter the growing threats of cyber-terrorism and Russian efforts to meddle in democratic elections in member nations.

And: NATO members must contribute their fair share. President Trump is right to press our European allies to invest more in their own defensive capacities.

But NATO has been, and continues to be, an integral part of our national  security strategy.

It’s an alliance worth defending.

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