Tag Archives: Republican

Hugh Hewitt: A Rare Bi-Partisan Opportunity for Congress

Older Americans face a housing crisis—and Congress has an opportunity to do something about it.

No: Retirement savings reform is not a hot topic for journalists, but it’s one of the few areas where Democrats and Republicans in Congress and President Trump could pull off some bipartisan reform when legislators reassemble in September.

Older Americans on fixed incomes face a housing crisis, and one part of that solution is retirement reform.

When Congress gets to gets back to business in the fall, they ought to consider how to help seniors stay in their homes as incomes decline or stop but mortgage payments stretch out into the future.

Retirement reform could allow seniors to pay off all or part of their home mortgage debt with money saved in their own retirement accounts without triggering taxes on the money used to do so.

Congress has an opportunity to take a big step toward solving one part of this problem.

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Michael Medved: Joe Biden: Combining Radical Substance with Moderate Style?


In campaigning for president, Joe Biden faces a difficult dilemma: if he moves left to placate his party’s increasingly socialistic base, he’ll lose the moderate support he needs to challenge Donald Trump. But if he runs as a compromising centrist, enraged party progressives will block his nomination.

The problem is that satisfying progressives requires such radical positions—like racial reparations, forgiving student loans, and banning private health insurance—that middle-of-the-road voters won’t be reassured by an easy-going style. If the election becomes a referendum on a stridently leftist Democratic platform, Republicans should be able to build a big majority in opposition.

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Hugh Hewitt: Revolution for Fairness on the Courts


Last month, the Ninth Circuit of the Federal Courts, which includes eight western states and some territories, held one of its en banc sessions. Because of the size of this Court, which includes 29 active judgeships, an en banc panel doesn’t include all of the judges but only a so-called “draw” of 11. Important cases get this treatment. In June, for the first time in memory, the draw of 11 featured a majority of judges appointed by a Republican president.

This says nothing about the outcome of the case or whether it will prove a blockbuster, but it tells everyone that President Trump and Senate Majority Leader McConnell’s focused efforts to restore balance to all of the circuits are paying off.

President Trump has seen 41 of his circuit court nominees confirmed.

It’s a revolution for fairness on the courts and for all litigants and one voters should in 2020 should endorse continuing.

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Davenport: The Democrat’s Dilemma: Persuasion or Turnout


Richard Nixon, who ran 5 times for president or vice president, said he ran to the right to win the Republican nomination, but then back toward the center in the general election. 

In 2004, George W. Bush and Karl Rove reinvented presidential campaigns. Discovering that undecided independent voters had shrunk from 20-plus percent to single digits, they concentrated on turning out their own base of voters and it worked. Later campaigns have followed this sometimes ugly, but effective strategy. 

Now the Democrats face a dilemma.  Their early energy was all from far left Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris.

But not so fast, as late entry Joe Biden is more moderate, though he is being pushed left on issues such as abortion and climate change.

Persuading the middle better suits Biden, but Democrats may demand a hard left turn.

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Michael Medved: Minor Parties Play the Wild Card

The five presidential elections of the 21st Century have established a clear pattern of close battles between evenly matched parties—a pattern charismatic candidates and billions in spending can’t seem to break.

Republican nominees have all won similar popular vote percentages, ranging from 51 percent for George W. Bush in 2004, to 46 percent for both John McCain and Donald Trump.

Democrats draw similar support—between Obama’s 53 percent in 2008 and Hillary’s 48 percent last time.

What changes more significantly from election to election is the vote for minor party candidates, which soared to 6 percent in 2016, more than triple their combined percentage in 2008 and 2012. If Howard Schultz runs a third party campaign, and protest candidates draw a total of 7 million votes as they did last time, President Trump is almost certain to benefit.

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Michael Medved: The Key Three Will Determine Everything

Democrats won’t repeat their huge mistake of 2016—focusing on the popular vote and national polling while ignoring crucial mechanics of the Electoral College.

To unseat Trump, the Democrats must flip at least three of the nine crucial swing states Trump won last time. Now that won’t be easy, with perennial battlegrounds Ohio and Florida trending in a strongly Republican direction.

Instead, Democrats will concentrate on three heartland pick-ups: Pennsylvania, Michigan and Wisconsin.

In all three states, Republicans fared very badly in 2018, losing Senate and governor’s races. Trump needs to hold just one of these three keystones and he’ll win: even if Democrats take both Michigan and Pennsylvania—the two larger prizes of the “key three”—Trump still gets 270 and wins the presidency by a single electoral vote.

Look for another close, fierce, fight to the finish!

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Jerry Bowyer: The Challenges Presented by Full Employment

Critics of the Republican tax reform package argue that it benefited Wall Street and the ultra-wealthy but not Main Street and the middle class. But recent data show that this is almost exactly the opposite of the truth.

Though the large stock indices are up slightly since the implementation of the tax cut at the beginning of 2018, the real effects of the cuts have been felt in massive job creation.

The latest employment report showed over 300k jobs created in just one month. The latest jobs opening report showed that for the first time in the history of this statistic, there are more job openings than job seekers.

As the tax cut was working its way through Congress, I warned that America’s employment problem was about to go from a labor glut to a labor shortage.

That’s where we are now—at full employment. The next challenge is getting people ready for those jobs.

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