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Tag Archives: Republican

Albert Mohler: The Moral Vacuity of Our Cultural Elites


New York Magazine recently published an article entitled “180 Minutes with Desmond is Amazing. He’s a ten year old drag performer and he’s cooler than you.”

This was accompanied by a full page photograph of a ten year old boy dressed out in drag; a photograph that under any other circumstance would likely be identified as skirting right up to the limit of child pornography.

The “cultural elites” behind such messaging are not just trying to change moral beliefs, they are trying to transform moral instincts at an even more basic level.

New York Magazine wants you to know that this ten year old drag entertainer, ‘Desmond is Amazing,’ is cooler than you, but in this context ‘amazing’ and ‘cool’ are two words that show the complete moral insanity of a society.

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Hugh Hewitt: What to Hope for From a North Korea Summit


President Trump has agreed to go to a summit with the dictator of North Korea, Kim Jung Un. Those who have watched three previous administrations fail to curb the North Korean nuclear program are stunned and wondering out loud what could possibly come of such a meeting.

If Donald Trump comes back with any concessions it will be a major win for his foreign policy even as the destruction of the physical caliphate of ISIS achieved under his watch is in sharp contrast to the fecklessness of the Obama years. We are watching the renewal of a policy of peace through strength, and a key part of that is the massive budget increase passed by Congress earlier this year. After 8 years of appeasement, American power is back and deployed around the globe. It may be enough to bring calm to the Korean peninsula, or it may not work. Either way, it is preferable to the appeasement that marked the Obama years.

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Are Republicans Really in Danger in the 2018 Elections?

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — January 20, 2018

Hugh Hewitt invites Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman Bob Goodlatte to explain the contentious issues on the DACA impasse in Washington, DC. Larry Elder and John Lott, the president of the Crime Prevention Center, dig into the data concerning the true record of illegal immigrants in his state, Arizona. Hugh Hewitt allows two journalists to give their opposite prognostications of Republican performance in the upcoming midterm elections. Mike Allen tells Hewitt why a Democratic takeover the house “now looks likely.” Robert Costa contends that the Republicans still have an upper hand due to a promising economy. Dennis Prager follows with the latest news on his battle with Google and their unfair practices against PragerU and other conservative publishers on YouTube. Michael Medved honors the memory of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. by correcting the liberal media’s rewriting of King’s ideological history. Finally, Medved inserts himself into the controversy of Trump’s recently reported statements against Haiti, by rejecting the media’s extreme reaction while advising the administration to avoid language that contradicts their own merit-based immigration proposal.

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Albert Mohler: The Handmaid’s Tale and the Threat of Theocracy

Billy Graham

The 75th Annual Golden Globes recently awarded the prize for best drama to “The Handmaid’s Tale.”

The show is based on the dystopian novel of the same title, written by Margaret Atwood.

Hollywood would have us believe that Margaret Atwood pointed to what we’re facing now in America with the #MeToo movement. In reality, the novel was first published in 1985.

Back in 1985, Atwood was warning of about the impulse to theocracy in the Reagan administration.

Atwood basically renewed her charges of theocracy every time a Republican was elected as president.

But intellectual honesty compels us to recognize that when Margaret Atwood is talking about theocracy in her vision of dystopia, she’s actually talking about any legal mechanism to regulate marriage or sexuality in a way that doesn’t meet her feminist expectations.

So throw questions such as assisted reproduction and abortion and others into the mix and you pretty much have the picture of what it takes for Margaret Atwood to declare a theocracy.

 

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A Cancer Growing on Congress

Compromise

There is a cancer growing on Congress.  It is the curse of party-line voting.  The biggest legislation of the Trump administration is the tax bill, passed with only Republican votes.  And the biggest of the Obama administration:  Obamacare, again passed on a party-line vote with only Democrats.

Party-line voting has grown dramatically in the last 40 years.  In the 1970s, party unity voting was around 60 percent but today it is 90 percent.  Sadly it has become the new normal.

Such partisanship is cancerous because it cuts out all the people and ideas of one political party. And it leads to rushed votes, without the expected give and take and amendments of a quality legislative process. It also leads to weak laws because what can be passed by one party’s vote can be undone later by the other party’s vote.

This is no way to run a government.  I vote for more collaboration and less hyper-partisanship in 2018.

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What the U.S. Must Do to Help the Citizens of Iran

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — January 6, 2018

Hugh Hewitt invites Admiral James Stavridis and Senator Tom Cotton to share what it takes to get the United States involved in a conflict like the one happening in Iran citizen protest.  Mike Gallagher speaks with Ben Shapiro about an article he wrote in support of the protestors in Iran. Michael Medved discusses Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich’s theory on the November midterm elections amidst the currently predicted GOP disaster. Dennis Prager shares his list of California‘s self-destructive laws passed. Prager also discusses the evil form of government that today’s youth seldom understand: communism. Mike Gallager ponders the new developments that businesses have recently employed in an effort to be politically correct.

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Michael Medved: Trump Wins as a Mainstream Conservative

Opioid

Donald Trump’s first year in office delivered an array of important achievements: confirmation of conservative judges, including Neil Gorsuch; more support for oil pipelines and oil drilling; dramatic progress against ISIS; deregulation and enhanced border security; the end of meddlesome net neutrality; the recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital; and, most importantly, sweeping tax cuts and a new pro-business approach. What’s striking about these accomplishments isn’t how extraordinary they are but how normal: how consistent with well-established Republican goals and values. It’s easy to imagine that much the same policies might have been pursued by President Trump’s primary rivals—or by Mitt Romney, the last GOP nominee.

 

The two initiatives that caused most substantial disagreement with many conventional conservatives—canceling the Trans Pacific Partnership and unilaterally leaving the Paris accords—hardly defined ​Trump’s presidency or brought about the calamitous results his critics feared.

 

At year’s end, President Trump found historic success not as a radical outsider but as a sensible, determined, mainstream Republican.

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