Tag Archives: Republican

Mohler: Our Government Spending-and What It Reveals


Our government spending is way up—and everyone is seemingly fine with it.

A recent headline at the New York Times captured it well: “A Giant Deficit, Once Dreaded, Is Now Desired.” Historically, of course, we’ve had a long-standing argument in American politics about debt, the deficit, and government spending.

But now, all those old rules seem to be completely out the door.

On both sides of the political aisle, we have politicians making arguments they wouldn’t have believed they could have gotten away with just eight weeks ago. Republicans don’t sound like Republicans, and some of the Democrats sound like the kind of Democrat that other Democrats would have run from just weeks ago.

We need to be alerted to the danger of debt—a debt that future generations will have to repay.

Our economic decisions reveal our morality, our culture, our priorities … these decisions eventually reveal who we are.

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Hewitt: The New “Master of the Senate”


Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has emerged as the keystone of our nation’s capitol.

Amid a pandemic threat that has caused the nation’s worst crisis since 9/11 coupled with fiscal/economic challenges that are already the equal of the Great Recession, McConnell has been nothing short of “magnificent.”

That description came from former House speaker Newt Gingrich, who went on in his interview with me last week to call McConnell, “one of the most important Senate leaders in American history.”

Gingrich is right.

The complexity of our time, the depth of partisan rancor and the intensity of media glare will help secure McConnell’s legacy as among the most talented legislators in our nation’s history.

They called LBJ the “Master of the Senate.” In times of crisis. it’s comforting to have a leader every bit LBJ’s equal at work for the country, the Constitution and the Republican Party.

We are witnessing Leader McConnell at his finest hour.

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Medved: An Opportunity for the GOP


A new Gallup Poll shows the Democrats’ diversity—not only in racial terms but in ideological outlook. The GOP remains overwhelmingly conservative—with 73 percent describing themselves that way and only 4 percent identifying as liberals.

Meanwhile, a full 14 percent of Democrats called themselves “conservatives” and another 36 percent said they’re “moderates.” While Democratic leaders drift to the left of their base, the GOP should target conservatives and moderates in Democratic ranks.

If you get a new voter to show up to vote Republican, that’s good—but it gives you just one extra ballot. If you convert a Democrat to your cause, you not only a bag new a vote for your side, but simultaneously take a ballot from the other side.

That’s the right formula for decisive Republican victory.

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Hugh Hewitt: A Rare Bi-Partisan Opportunity for Congress

Older Americans face a housing crisis—and Congress has an opportunity to do something about it.

No: Retirement savings reform is not a hot topic for journalists, but it’s one of the few areas where Democrats and Republicans in Congress and President Trump could pull off some bipartisan reform when legislators reassemble in September.

Older Americans on fixed incomes face a housing crisis, and one part of that solution is retirement reform.

When Congress gets to gets back to business in the fall, they ought to consider how to help seniors stay in their homes as incomes decline or stop but mortgage payments stretch out into the future.

Retirement reform could allow seniors to pay off all or part of their home mortgage debt with money saved in their own retirement accounts without triggering taxes on the money used to do so.

Congress has an opportunity to take a big step toward solving one part of this problem.

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Michael Medved: Joe Biden: Combining Radical Substance with Moderate Style?


In campaigning for president, Joe Biden faces a difficult dilemma: if he moves left to placate his party’s increasingly socialistic base, he’ll lose the moderate support he needs to challenge Donald Trump. But if he runs as a compromising centrist, enraged party progressives will block his nomination.

The problem is that satisfying progressives requires such radical positions—like racial reparations, forgiving student loans, and banning private health insurance—that middle-of-the-road voters won’t be reassured by an easy-going style. If the election becomes a referendum on a stridently leftist Democratic platform, Republicans should be able to build a big majority in opposition.

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Hugh Hewitt: Revolution for Fairness on the Courts


Last month, the Ninth Circuit of the Federal Courts, which includes eight western states and some territories, held one of its en banc sessions. Because of the size of this Court, which includes 29 active judgeships, an en banc panel doesn’t include all of the judges but only a so-called “draw” of 11. Important cases get this treatment. In June, for the first time in memory, the draw of 11 featured a majority of judges appointed by a Republican president.

This says nothing about the outcome of the case or whether it will prove a blockbuster, but it tells everyone that President Trump and Senate Majority Leader McConnell’s focused efforts to restore balance to all of the circuits are paying off.

President Trump has seen 41 of his circuit court nominees confirmed.

It’s a revolution for fairness on the courts and for all litigants and one voters should in 2020 should endorse continuing.

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Davenport: The Democrat’s Dilemma: Persuasion or Turnout


Richard Nixon, who ran 5 times for president or vice president, said he ran to the right to win the Republican nomination, but then back toward the center in the general election. 

In 2004, George W. Bush and Karl Rove reinvented presidential campaigns. Discovering that undecided independent voters had shrunk from 20-plus percent to single digits, they concentrated on turning out their own base of voters and it worked. Later campaigns have followed this sometimes ugly, but effective strategy. 

Now the Democrats face a dilemma.  Their early energy was all from far left Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris.

But not so fast, as late entry Joe Biden is more moderate, though he is being pushed left on issues such as abortion and climate change.

Persuading the middle better suits Biden, but Democrats may demand a hard left turn.

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