Tag Archives: Republican

A Cancer Growing on Congress

Compromise

There is a cancer growing on Congress.  It is the curse of party-line voting.  The biggest legislation of the Trump administration is the tax bill, passed with only Republican votes.  And the biggest of the Obama administration:  Obamacare, again passed on a party-line vote with only Democrats.

Party-line voting has grown dramatically in the last 40 years.  In the 1970s, party unity voting was around 60 percent but today it is 90 percent.  Sadly it has become the new normal.

Such partisanship is cancerous because it cuts out all the people and ideas of one political party. And it leads to rushed votes, without the expected give and take and amendments of a quality legislative process. It also leads to weak laws because what can be passed by one party’s vote can be undone later by the other party’s vote.

This is no way to run a government.  I vote for more collaboration and less hyper-partisanship in 2018.

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What the U.S. Must Do to Help the Citizens of Iran

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review — January 6, 2018

Hugh Hewitt invites Admiral James Stavridis and Senator Tom Cotton to share what it takes to get the United States involved in a conflict like the one happening in Iran citizen protest.  Mike Gallagher speaks with Ben Shapiro about an article he wrote in support of the protestors in Iran. Michael Medved discusses Former Speaker of the House Newt Gingrich’s theory on the November midterm elections amidst the currently predicted GOP disaster. Dennis Prager shares his list of California‘s self-destructive laws passed. Prager also discusses the evil form of government that today’s youth seldom understand: communism. Mike Gallager ponders the new developments that businesses have recently employed in an effort to be politically correct.

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Michael Medved: Trump Wins as a Mainstream Conservative

Opioid

Donald Trump’s first year in office delivered an array of important achievements: confirmation of conservative judges, including Neil Gorsuch; more support for oil pipelines and oil drilling; dramatic progress against ISIS; deregulation and enhanced border security; the end of meddlesome net neutrality; the recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital; and, most importantly, sweeping tax cuts and a new pro-business approach. What’s striking about these accomplishments isn’t how extraordinary they are but how normal: how consistent with well-established Republican goals and values. It’s easy to imagine that much the same policies might have been pursued by President Trump’s primary rivals—or by Mitt Romney, the last GOP nominee.

 

The two initiatives that caused most substantial disagreement with many conventional conservatives—canceling the Trans Pacific Partnership and unilaterally leaving the Paris accords—hardly defined ​Trump’s presidency or brought about the calamitous results his critics feared.

 

At year’s end, President Trump found historic success not as a radical outsider but as a sensible, determined, mainstream Republican.

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Jerry Bowyer: On Tax Reform: Businesses Take “Wait and See” Approach

Jordan Peterson

Republican leaders are now out with their proposal for tax reform.

The good news is the plan is pro-growth. It really could get us out of the lurch, giving corporations a mechanism to bring almost 3 trillion dollars home from abroad, and to reinvest that money right here … in America.

The bad news—or the concerning news—is we’re running out of time.

The plan allows businesses to fully expense many equipment purchases. But until the tax passes, business are going to take a “wait and see” approach.

Why buy equipment now if you can wait till tax reform passes?—when you can then buy and deduct the expense right away?

If the tax reform takes too long to pass, the economy will slow, and the GOP could enter a mid-term election in the midst of a slow-down or even a recession—and they’ll pay a price.

No, this tax plan is not perfect, but it’s a vast improvement over what we have now.

Republicans and moderate Democrats ought to move quickly to pass it.

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Michael Medved: Trump’s Surprising Coalition: Not Just “Deplorables”

Opioid

James T. Hogkinson, the crazed gunman who fired at Republican congressmen in early June, hardly fits the common image of a militant Bernie Sanders Democrat. He was 66, married for 30 years, a proud gun-owner, working in construction and living in a small Midwestern town. In fact, he came close to stereotypes of one of Trump’s blue-collar “deplorables,” which only highlights the dishonest nature of common media narratives.

Actually, Trump’s core support wasn’t the downtrodden working class: he did better among the third of voters who earned more than $100,000 a year than among the two-thirds who earned less than that. Among the one-third of voters who earned below $50,000, Trump lost to Clinton by 12 points. Nor were his supporters overwhelmingly uneducated: he actually won white voters with college degrees, 37 percent of the overall electorate. The Trump coalition was far more varied and complex than simplistic analysis and conventional wisdom suggest.

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Lanhee Chen: Karen Handel’s Victory

Tax Reform

Republican Karen Handel’s victory in the special election in Georgia’s Sixth Congressional District will generate a lot of punditry and spin.

Democrats will argue that they got a lot closer than they should have in a district that Republican Tom Price, now the Secretary of Health and Human Services, won by 23 points less than a year ago.

Republicans will respond by noting that their opponents poured $30 million into the race and yet the Democrat wasn’t able to do any better than Hillary Clinton did in losing the district to Donald Trump last year.

Both sides are right, to some degree. That’s why it’s hard to draw too many conclusions about what this means for the midterms next year. There are many political lifetimes to be led between now and then. And intervening events will impact voters’ opinions over the next 17 months.

We’d all be well served to take a deep breath and let it all unfold. Predicting the future never has been a very good business to be in, anyway.

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