Tag Archives: Republicans

Michael Medved: No Replacement for Religion

On one point regarding our country’s current condition, Republicans and Democrats seem to agree: three-quarters in both parties say, “religion is losing influence in American life.” According to a new study for Pew Research Center, Republicans consider that a bad thing, by a ratio of 9 to 1, while half of Democrats say they’re okay with the trend; 22 percent say religion’s decline makes no difference, while 25 percent insist that it’s a positive development.

But if organized faith continues to lose influence, what force should take its place? “Climatism”—a new faith derided by Josef Joffe in Commentary magazine promises earthly annihilation instead of heavenly salvation. For 100 years, Marxist true-believers created “Heavens on Earth” that became living hells for hundreds of millions, and unbridled secular materialism has recently spurred surging rates of deaths of despair. The spectacular failure of potential substitutes for organized faith have only served to emphasize its irreplaceability.

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Hugh Hewitt: Stick With the Facts

As the Democrats in the House continue their hyper-partisan efforts to impeach the president, those of us in media who have defended the president need to stay far away from exaggeration during this process.

Some of the “deep-state” hyperbole we see distracts from the need to drive home the most important point — Chairman Adam Schiff is denying the president and his colleagues in the minority due process.

Senate Republicans should refuse any article of impeachment birthed by this deeply broken “process.” But neither the president nor the country is helped by hyperbole on their side.

Our rhetorical efforts should be focused on the fact that Trump did not commit an impeachable offense. In fact, he committed no offense at all — no quid pro quo, no extortion, no bribery.

Opportunities are lost every day when the president’s defenders overreach into conspiracy theory and refuse to wait upon the facts about wrongdoings by government officials in 2016, indeed if there are any at all.

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Lanhee Chen: The Ascendancy of the Socialist Left

A passing of the torch happened last weekend, when one progressive icon—Bernie Sanders—accepted an endorsement of his campaign from another progressive icon, Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Her endorsement came as no surprise to political observers, but heralded an important moment for the ascendancy of far-left wing politics within the Democratic Party. No longer can socialist policy positions be considered the fringes of the American left. Indeed, the movement led by Sanders and Ocasio-Cortez isn’t merely a minor blip in history to be dismissed with the next political cycle. It is the pathway down which the Democrats will take their politics, policymaking, and rhetoric in the years to come.

The ascendancy of the socialist left is a gift to President Trump and Republicans in Congress, who will run as defenders of a free-enterprise system that—while not perfect—has been the linchpin of American prosperity for generations. That’s an electoral fight that will be tough for Democrats to win.

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Hugh Hewitt: Release the Transcript

When Democrats demanded President Trump release the transcript of his phone call with Ukraine’s President Zelensky, the president quickly did so, even though such a precedent is deeply disturbing when one considers the need for any president to be able to assure their counterparts of confidentiality.

Now the tables have turned: Democrats staged a showy hearing in the House Intelligence Committee last week, featuring former Special Envoy to Ukraine Kurt Volker. Selected tiny bits of the proceedings were leaked in an attempt to bolster the Democrats’ threadbare argument that a quid pro quo happened. Republicans in the hearing say the full testimony reveals exactly the opposite, that there was no quid pro quo.

But: Adam Schiff—the chair—won’t release the transcript of the hearing after he demanded Trump release the transcript of the call.

Which one has something to hide?

The gravity of impeachment and the polarized nature of today’s political environment demands transparency.

Release the transcript, Adam Schiff.

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David Davenport: The Elephant In The Policy Room


You would never know this listening to presidential candidates but Social Security, in crisis mode for a while, will begin paying out more than it takes in next year. The reserve fund will be depleted in 16 years, meaning seniors would face 20 percent cuts in their payments.

Roughly half of Americans rely on Social Security for most of their retirement income. And with baby boomers retiring and living longer, the numbers will only get worse.

While Democrats talk about welfare and socialism, and Republicans love their tax cuts, we still need to pay for the entitlements we already have such as Social Security and Medicare.

Fixing this will take several things Washington hardly does anymore: exercise fiscal discipline, debate and deliberate, and come to some kind of bipartisan agreement.

Party line vote—the new normal in Washington—will not do the trick

Social Security needs a fix.

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Hugh Hewitt: A Favor for Republicans

Democrats have done Republicans a huge favor.

After the release of the Mueller report, the Democrats had two options: Either inflate the narrative of obstruction of justice, or attack the messenger who transmitted that report—a report that deeply disappointed them. That messenger was Attorney General William Barr.

They chose the latter course—and blundered terribly in doing so.

The whole premise of their criticism—that Barr somehow mishandled the release of the Mueller report was just absurd. Hysteria is a bad look. Democrats wore it better than their media boosters, but they still wore it poorly.

In attacking Barr, Democrats have hurt themselves. Not only did they appear desperate after their “bet everything on Mueller” wager went bust, but they proceeded to cement the alliance between President Trump and establishment Republicans, who were squarely behind Barr, in a way that had not occurred before.

From Barr to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, the electorate sees a face of resolve from an increasingly united GOP.

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Lanhee Chen: Russian Meddling and the Mueller Report

While Democrats and Republicans argue over what to make of the Mueller Report, one thing is abundantly clear from its hundreds of pages:

Russian efforts to interfere in the 2016 presidential election should not have come as a surprise to anyone—let alone President Obama and others in his administration who were asleep at the switch when it happened.

The Mueller Report is a stinging indictment of President Obama’s failure to deal forcefully and directly with the Russian threat. Russia had interfered in elections in the former Soviet Republics and throughout Europe in the years leading up to 2016. And their efforts to subvert US elections were known to officials as early as 2014. Other reports even suggest that national security officials who wanted a more aggressive response to Russian activities were ordered to “stand down” by President Obama’s national security adviser, Susan Rice.

There are no signs that the Russians plan to let up in their efforts to meddle in our democracy. Here’s to hoping President Trump doesn’t repeat the mistakes of his predecessor.

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