Tag Archives: Republicans

Michael Medved: Both Parties Exposed Problems at the Cohen Hearings

The televised Michael Cohen hearings of the House Oversight and Reform Committee showed that the two political parties not only differ in their attitudes toward president Trump, but offer a stark contrast in the demographics they represent.

Of the Democrats on the committee, 19 of 25—76 percent—were women or people of color or both. Democrats will never build a durable majority without doing better among white males, who still represent a full third of the electorate. Meanwhile, Republicans have the opposite problem: on the committee, they were nearly all white males—17 of 18—joining one white female from North Carolina.

The bigger GOP problem was regional imbalance: more than 70 percent of committee Republicans hailed from Southern states, and a party that is visibly dominated by just one part of the country has a problem in both public perceptions and balance.

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Senate Fails to Pass “Born Alive” Act

Townhall Review – March 2, 2019

Mike Gallagher opines on the U. S. Senate defeat of the “Born Alive Abortion Survivors Protection Act,” as well as examines the U. S. House of Representative’s Oversight Committee’s hearing with convicted former Trump lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Sebastian Gorka talks with Peter Schweizer, President of the American Accountability Institute, about the widening gap in the Democrat Party in the run-up to the 2020 elections.

Dennis Prager talks with Nancy Rommelmann, whose husband’s coffee business is now under attack following the release of a video she made criticizing the #metoo movement.

Mark Davis asks Wilfred Reilly, professor of Political Science at Kentucky State University, about his recent book, Hate Crime Hoax: How the Left is Selling a Fake Race War and about the Jussie Smollett case.

Actor and U.S. Veteran advocate Gary Sinise talks with Dennis Prager about his book, Grateful American.

Larry Elder offers up audio of the confrontation between Senator Diane Feinstein and a group of school children over the Green New Deal.

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Michael Medved: To Hold Power, GOP Must Win State-by-State Battles


To hold the Senate and White House in 2020’s upcoming battle royal, Republicans must focus on state-by-state results, not the ups and downs in national opinion polls. In 2018’s midterms, Republicans lost 40 House seats, 7 governorships and 22 of 33 U.S. Senate races.

In overwhelmingly conservative states like North Dakota, Indiana, and Missouri, Republican Senate candidates prevailed, as they did in one key swing state: Florida. But in other must-win states that Donald Trump carried last time—Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Arizona—Republican Senate challengers flopped.

They also lost in deep red West Virginia and Montana, while carrying Texas in just a squeaker. To retain power in the Senate and Electoral College, the GOP needs a more positive, pragmatic problem-solving approach to broaden the party’s base.

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Michael Medved: Impeachment Dreams, National Nightmares


Democratic impeachment dreams will inevitably collide with a Constitution that makes removal of a president all but impossible. With the current Senate line-up, Democrats would need to persuade 20 Republicans to join all 47 of them for the two-thirds vote to drive Trump from office.

In 232 years of Constitutional history, no US Senator—not even one—has ever voted to remove a president of his or her own party. What happened to Richard Nixon in 1974? The Watergate crisis climaxed in the midst of a midterm election campaign; a campaign in which the GOP ultimately lost 48 House seats and 5 in the Senate.

In a desperate bid to mitigate looming disaster, Senate leaders begged Nixon to resign. For the sake of his party and his country, he did so. In Trump’s case, elections are nearly two years away and, barring unforeseen, catastrophic revelations, his resignation is inconceivable.

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Michael Medved: Hurting the Press the President and the Country


Jim Acosta, the aggressively arrogant reporter for CNN, posed a recent question illustrating the biggest problem with the press.

The day after midterm elections, Acosta grilled the president by saying: “I want to challenge you on one of the statements that you made… that this caravan was an ‘invasion’ … As you know, Mr. President, the caravan was not an invasion.”

Now, if Acosta had quoted Nancy Pelosi or Chuck Schumer and then asked the president’s response, it would have been fair and appropriate, but it’s not a reporter’s job to “challenge” an official in his own name and his own voice.

Why not explore disagreements among politicians, without taking sides yourself? The undisguised anti-Trump contempt by leading journalists supports the idea that the nation’s biggest battle isn’t Democrats vs. Republicans, it’s the media vs. Trump: an impression that hurts the press, the president, and the country.

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Michael Medved: Something for Both Sides to Celebrate


The mid-term elections provided a rare occasion for conservatives and liberals, Republicans and Democrats, to look at the same events and feel a shared sense of satisfaction and encouragement.

Republicans feel good about expanding their Senate majority and holding key governorships in Florida, Ohio, and elsewhere. Democrats take pride in capturing the House and flipping governorships in Illinois, Michigan and more. Republicans won big races in deep blue states like Massachusetts and Vermont; Democrats gained ground in GOP strongholds like Kansas and South Carolina.

Americans know how to split tickets: in Maryland, Republican Governor Larry Hogan and Democratic Senator Ben Cardin both won simultaneous landslides.

The election returns show that Americans still care most about local issues plus the character and competence of their candidates.

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