Tag Archives: rhetoric

Hugh Hewitt: Exploiting the Nation’s Shock and Fear

The aftermath of the recent mass murders was a revealing one for today’s Democratic Party.

Indeed, almost all the leading Democratic candidates for president chose in the week following the horrors in El Paso and Dayton to pivot their main message from “Trump and Russia” to “Trump and racism.” At least five candidates went so far as to brand President Trump as a, believe it or not, white supremacist.

It’s repulsive rhetoric. It’s the “basket of deplorables” talk on steroids, and it says to every Trump supporter: “You, too, are a white supremacist.”

I don’t believe Trump is a racist, much less a white supremacist. This sort of rhetoric is incendiary and dangerous. It’s also politically self-destructive and so absurd as to be laughable but for its repetition.

But the Democratic candidates do not wish to argue, debate and persuade. They wish to smear and exclude. They have exploited the nation’s shock and fear to do so.

They should turn back.

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Albert Mohler: Crisis in the Human Heart

One of the most important and helpful statements made in the aftermath of the recent horrific mass shootings came by way of the Editorial Board of The Wall Street Journal.

The article is entitled, “The Killers in Our Midst.” The shootings, they write: “are horrifying assaults on peaceful communities by disturbed young men. American politics will try to simplify these events into a debate about guns or political rhetoric, but the common theme of these killings is the social alienation of young men that will be harder to address.”

They point to the fact that this is not a new reality, it is not a reality now that spans several presidential administrations, including presidents of both parties. The motivations of the killers, they observe, are “often too convoluted to sort into any clear ideology.”

So what we’re facing is a cultural crisis, a spiritual crisis, and it begins, as we know, in the human heart.

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Jerry Bowyer: After El Paso, After Dayton

Recently our nation was traumatized by two mass shootings. Predictably, these acts of evil were immediately ransacked by media commentators, politicians and candidates in search of political ammunition. Left-of-center media started in immediately after the El Paso massacre, blaming President Trump and Fox News. But in less than 24 hours, another mass shooting occurred in Ohio which appears to have been committed by someone of the Left, and of course, conservative media was quick to point that out.

Let me suggest that instead of using this to point the finger at hyperbolic rhetoric from the “other side,” we’d do well it to point the finger at hyperbolic rhetoric in general.

You don’t have to look too long at cable news and social media to see our cultural affinity for overheated rhetoric.

Extremism mixed with mental illness is a toxic, and even lethal cocktail.

Let’s let the measured rhetoric start with us.

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Gassing of Civilians Puts Syria in the Crosshairs

Townhall Review – April 14, 2018

Senator Joni Ernst, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, joins Hugh Hewitt to discuss the United States response to the deadly chemical attack by the Syrian regime leader Bashar al-Assad on the rebel-held town of Douma, Syria. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced hard questions from Congress on censoring conservative content, like that of Diamond and Silk. Hugh Hewitt and Larry Kudlow, Director of the National Economic Council, take on the issue of tariffs and how it appears China has softened their rhetoric. John Fund, national affairs columnist for National Review, and Hugh Hewitt discuss the issue of alleged voter fraud in California. Dennis Prager looks at the emotional damage women may face from the “Hookup Culture.” Michael Medved looks at the reality of gun confiscation in one American city, Deerfield, Illinois. Freedom of speech on college and university campuses is under attack and Dr. Everett Piper, President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University, an outspoken proponent of freedom of speech on campus filled in Mike Gallagher to take on that subject.

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Michael Medved: Partisanship Trumps Policy in Reacting to North Korea


Reactions to White House plans to meet with Kim Jong-Un highlight the damaging impact of partisan polarization and obsessive Trump hatred.

Had Barack Obama arranged to negotiate with the brutal North Korean dictator, some of the same Democrats now deriding Trump would have hailed their hero as a bold visionary, deserving of a second Nobel prize.

Some of the voices that blamed Trump for incendiary rhetoric leading toward needless war now attack him for reckless concessions in pursuit of peace. Of course, this new initiative could still collapse in a U.S. setback, but Americans should give the president broad support to strengthen his hand. Yes, Trump true-believers can sometimes embarrass themselves by claiming the president can do no wrong, but his die-hard critics damage our politics by insisting that he can do no right.

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