Tag Archives: sanctions

Lanhee Chen: The President Was Right to Walk Away

President Trump’s recent summit with North Korean dictator Kim Jong-Un may have ended without a deal, but the entire episode served to demonstrate that sometimes, walking away is the best decision.

Published news reports suggest that the North Koreans were asking us to lift many of the most onerous sanctions that have been placed upon them, in return for a promise that they’d destroy a site that’s been called the “heart” of their nuclear program.

But there were no guarantees that we’d be allowed to verify their claims. And certainly no guarantees that they’d keep their promises.

Given our history with the rogue regime, we have plenty of reason to distrust.
It can be tough to walk away from a negotiation, particularly when it would be politically expedient to do otherwise.

That’s why President Trump should be congratulated for doing what he did.

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: Maduro’s Days in Power Are Numbered


Our government has now introduced sanctions targeting Venezuela’s oil industry as we up the pressure on the dictator Maduro to get out. We’ve turned off the oil as well as access to the money. We’ve called for military leaders to switch their allegiance to the man now recognized as Venezuela’s legitimate head of state: Juan Guaidó.

And we’ve made it clear that any attempt to harm remaining U.S. diplomats in Venezuela will—in the words of National Security Adviser Ambassador John Bolton—“Be met with a significant response.”

Bolton declined to comment on what that response would be, but he was carrying a yellow pad. And on that yellow pad was written, “5,000 troops to Columbia.” That’s an army combat brigade.

Now: John Bolton does nothing by mistake. Ambassador Bolton is a friend of mine. I know John Bolton. I’ve worked with John Bolton. John Bolton is no Ben Rhodes.

All options are on the table.

Maduro’s days in power are numbered.

Thank God!

Read More »

Hugh Hewitt: Venezuela’s Maduro Is Now a Dicatator

U.S. Senate

Nicolas Maduro, president—really dictator—of Venezuela recently held a sham election to rewrite the country’s constitution. The pretext for the vote was to create a new National Constituent Assembly to draft a new Venezuelan constitution.

Speaking in the White House briefing room, General H.R. McMaster said, “The sham election of the National Constituent Assembly [in Venezuela] represents a very serious blow to democracy in our hemisphere. Maduro is not just a bad leader. He is now a dictator.”

Shortly after the so-called election, opposition leaders were seized from their homes by Venezuela’s secret police. It is a humanitarian crisis in addition to a political one.

The United States has responded by imposing strict sanctions. No one in the U.S. can do business with Venezuela. Mr. Maduro also joins a very short list of heads of state who are personally sanctioned by our government.

Nonetheless, the question remains: Can the United States allow a dictator with ties to Iran to set up in Venezuela?

No. The U.S. must act.

[soundcloud url=”https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/335963844″ params=”color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false” width=”100%” height=”166″ iframe=”true” /]

Read More »