Tag Archives: Senate

Lanhee Chen: The Court Legacy for the Trump Era

The United States Senate confirmed President Trump’s 150th judicial nominee last week, marking what Senator Lindsay Graham of South Carolina called a “historic milestone.”

Indeed, of all the accomplishments that President Trump and Republicans in the Senate will be remembered for, none may be as significant as the remaking of the federal judiciary. President Trump has nominated, and the Senate has confirmed, judges who will respect the rule of law and interpret the Constitution faithfully.

Amongst Trump’s nominees who have been confirmed are two Supreme Court justices; 43 Appeals Court judges; and over 100 District Court judges. These numbers are staggering. But perhaps even more noteworthy is the number of judges who are young enough to serve on their respective courts for a very long time. President Trump hasn’t just altered the federal judiciary temporarily, but has remade it in a way that will have staying power for decades to come. That’s an accomplishment that he—and Senate Republicans—should be proud of.

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Michael Medved: Altering America Beyond Recognition

Every election, candidates claim: “This is the most important election of our lifetime” but that’s generally untrue. For better or worse, no President since Reagan has profoundly transformed the country, but 2020 could well be different.

Democrats seem determined to run on a radical, irresponsible platform that includes the Green New Deal, race-based reparations, Medicare for all, “soak the rich” Tax hikes, and free pre-school and college. Such programs would bring a vast expansion of the welfare state, strangling growth and swelling budget deficits.

Even worse, Democrats seek permanent rule by discarding the Electoral College, packing the Supreme Court, and destroying conservative media with some version of the discredited “fairness doctrine.” They also seek instant statehood for Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico—guaranteeing four new Democratic Senators. If Democrats sweep both White House and Senate next year, America could be altered beyond recognition – perhaps beyond recovery.

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Michael Medved: To Hold Power, GOP Must Win State-by-State Battles


To hold the Senate and White House in 2020’s upcoming battle royal, Republicans must focus on state-by-state results, not the ups and downs in national opinion polls. In 2018’s midterms, Republicans lost 40 House seats, 7 governorships and 22 of 33 U.S. Senate races.

In overwhelmingly conservative states like North Dakota, Indiana, and Missouri, Republican Senate candidates prevailed, as they did in one key swing state: Florida. But in other must-win states that Donald Trump carried last time—Pennsylvania, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Arizona—Republican Senate challengers flopped.

They also lost in deep red West Virginia and Montana, while carrying Texas in just a squeaker. To retain power in the Senate and Electoral College, the GOP needs a more positive, pragmatic problem-solving approach to broaden the party’s base.

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David Davenport: What’s at Stake in the 2018 Elections


435 House and 33 Senate seats.  36 governorships.  6,665 state offices and tens of thousands of local ones.  And you ask what’s at stake in the 2018 elections?

There’s more: important ballot measures like the gas tax in California, carbon emissions in Washington, Medicaid expansion and voting rights.

Beyond the direct effects of your vote lie other questions.  If we split the House and Senate, will anything be passed in the next two years?  Even though Donald Trump is not on the ballot, this election will largely be a referendum on his performance.

It’s embarrassing but, according to the Pew Research Center, voter turnout in the U.S. is only 26th out of 32 democratic countries.

Isn’t there enough at stake for you to vote?  Believe me, this is not a year to be disengaged.  Turn out and do your part.

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U.S. Fulfills Promise to Israel in Embassy Move to Jerusalem


Townhall Review – May 19, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and Lanhee Chen, of Stanford Law and the Hoover Institution, sit down to talk about the judicial confirmation process in the U.S. Senate. Phil Cowan invites Jonathan Keller, of the California Family Counsel to examine California AB 2943, “Unlawful business practices: Sexual Orientation Change Effort” that would ban the assistance of helping individuals with issues of sexual orientation. Mike Gallagher and Israeli businessman Mein Weingarten discuss the move of the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Michael Medved speaks with Michael Oren, former Israeli Ambassador, about the demonstrations in Gaza following the embassy move. Heather Mac Donald and Larry Elder hash out the latest regarding the “Me Too” movement. Homelessness is the topic discussed by Michael Meved with academic Sarah Rankin. Dennis Prager looks at an NPR who reporter gets tangled up while trying to cover up bias because the subject doesn’t cooperate.

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