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Tag Archives: Senate

David Davenport: What’s at Stake in the 2018 Elections


435 House and 33 Senate seats.  36 governorships.  6,665 state offices and tens of thousands of local ones.  And you ask what’s at stake in the 2018 elections?

There’s more: important ballot measures like the gas tax in California, carbon emissions in Washington, Medicaid expansion and voting rights.

Beyond the direct effects of your vote lie other questions.  If we split the House and Senate, will anything be passed in the next two years?  Even though Donald Trump is not on the ballot, this election will largely be a referendum on his performance.

It’s embarrassing but, according to the Pew Research Center, voter turnout in the U.S. is only 26th out of 32 democratic countries.

Isn’t there enough at stake for you to vote?  Believe me, this is not a year to be disengaged.  Turn out and do your part.

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U.S. Fulfills Promise to Israel in Embassy Move to Jerusalem


Townhall Review – May 19, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and Lanhee Chen, of Stanford Law and the Hoover Institution, sit down to talk about the judicial confirmation process in the U.S. Senate. Phil Cowan invites Jonathan Keller, of the California Family Counsel to examine California AB 2943, “Unlawful business practices: Sexual Orientation Change Effort” that would ban the assistance of helping individuals with issues of sexual orientation. Mike Gallagher and Israeli businessman Mein Weingarten discuss the move of the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Michael Medved speaks with Michael Oren, former Israeli Ambassador, about the demonstrations in Gaza following the embassy move. Heather Mac Donald and Larry Elder hash out the latest regarding the “Me Too” movement. Homelessness is the topic discussed by Michael Meved with academic Sarah Rankin. Dennis Prager looks at an NPR who reporter gets tangled up while trying to cover up bias because the subject doesn’t cooperate.

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Michael Medved: Korea as Key to Victory for Trump and GOP


Over-confident Democrats take comfort in the history of mid-term elections in a new president’s first term: for nearly two centuries, the party in power almost always loses seats in Congress.

But Republicans should feel encouraged by the only exception to that rule since FDR: in 2002, George W. Bush defied history and Republicans gained strength in both the House and Senate. Low expectations for Bush in foreign policy meant that his strong response to 9/11 looked especially impressive.

If President Trump makes serious progress in upcoming Korea negotiations, he too could beat expectations and powerfully improve GOP prospects. Already, foreign leaders like South Korea’s Moon are promoting Trump for the Nobel Peace Prize and such talk could intensify as the election approaches.

Reduced tensions on the Korean Peninsula would be good for the world, good for America and great for embattled GOP candidates in House and Senate races.

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David Davenport: The Senate Is Broken


Former President James Buchanan called the United States Senate “the greatest deliberative body in the world.”  But Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana, recently complained that he hasn’t even been able to get a vote on a single legislative amendment in his first 15 months on the job.

The fact is that the U.S. Senate has largely quit deliberating.  The Senate has voted on only 6 non-budgetary amendments so far this year and has taken only 25 roll call votes in the two-year Congress, compared with 154 at this point in the last Congress.

Bills are held in secret until 51 votes are lined up and then sprung on the Senate.  Largely gone are the committee deliberations, debates and amendments.

Votes are taken largely to make statements for the next election, not to make great public policy.  It’s high time Congress returned to “regular order.”

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Hugh Hewitt: Agony in the Wake of Florida Shooting

U.S. Senate

How can the slaughter of high school students be so polarizing? It is agonizing beyond any writer’s ability to convey, but a political football to begin another round of pro- and anti-Trump throwdowns?

 

I didn’t see that coming out of the sorrow from the Florida shooting.

 

It was like an instant replay of reactions that we witnessed after the massacre in Sutherland Springs, Texas and every awful massacre since Columbine.

 

It has left commentary without a purpose. If everyone — always — makes the same demands, nearly instantly; without any room for consideration of the specifics of the murderer’s motivation and history, it’s hard to imagine what “change” will avail.

 

A place to start for us would be hearings.

 

I got the idea from my NBC colleague Chuck Todd. I put it to Education Secretary DeVos and Attorney General Sessions. They both agreed.

 

If hearings occur, we need one more promise: for everyone to actually hear the viewpoints presented.

 

Let’s stop the outrage and just listen.

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Albert Mohler: A Very Historic Vote on the Floor of the United States Senate

Headlines

On January 29, we witnessed a very historic vote on the floor of the United States Senate.

The vote was for the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, a bill that would’ve banned abortion after the unborn child had reached 20 weeks of gestation. It failed by a vote of 51-46—reaching a majority but falling short the required 60 votes to move the bill to the floor for a full up or down vote.

But what we saw was courageous—and it was convictional. It was necessary. Remember that it took 15 years in order for the United States Senate to pass what became known as the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act—15 years of bringing bills to a vote again and again and again until finally a sufficient number of senators voted for that bill protecting babies from partial-birth abortion.

And senators are going to have to bring the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act back. We have to hope that they will—again and again and again—until we reach the 60 votes necessary to make this act the law of the land.

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Albert Mohler: The Truth About The American Bar Association

Billy Graham

The American Bar Association has recently tipped its hand, showing how very partisan it has become.
Joe Palazzolo, writing at the Wall Street Journal, reports that “tensions between Senate Republicans and the bar association, the largest organization of lawyers in the nation, have escalated in recent weeks after the ABA pronounced a Nebraska lawyer unfit to serve on the Eighth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.”

Why? Because of his, “‘deeply-held social agenda.’’

The nominee, Mr. Steven Grasz, said that a member of the ABA evaluation committee who interviewed him repeatedly referred to Republicans and conservatives as “you guys” or “you people” and also asked for Mr. Grasz’s personal views on abortion, the death penalty and adoption by same-sex couples.

Senator Ben Sasse of Nebraska got it exactly right when he said, “We should completely dispel with the fiction that the American Bar Association is a fair and impartial arbiter of facts.”

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