Tag Archives: Silicon Valley

Jerry Bowyer: Big Tech Companies Are in Denial

Tech companies are in denial about the risks associated with political bias. They repeatedly feign ignorance before congressional committees and pretend to have no idea what shareholders are talking about when the issue is brought up at annual meetings. I know this from personal experience.

These executives are typically dismissive as though the issue isn’t even worth a discussion.

Well, maybe they’d better listen to the president of the company which in many ways built the modern information economy: Microsoft and their current CEO—Brad Smith. He recently told Neil Cavuto that “we in the tech sector need to step up” when it comes to inclusion of different political views.

So: the denial phase is over.

Microsoft is too big to be written off.

Silicon Valley has a thumb on the scale when it comes to conservatives. It’s up to them to restore our confidence.

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David Davenport: Coronavirus Crisis Revives Federalism

One silver lining in the dark coronavirus cloud is the revival of federalism, the old-fashioned idea that not every issue has to be decided in Washington. While most every policy issue—from education to health care and beyond—has traveled a one-way road from states and local governments to Washington, the coronavirus crisis rediscovered a leadership role for state and local government.

Early on we learned that states like New York, California and Washington needed to address the crisis more quickly and their governors began to lead. In California, there were higher concentrations in Silicon Valley and San Francisco, so mayors and county commissioners took action. Important work was done well before there was a national consensus, and these laboratories of experimentation informed larger policies.

This is exactly how the founders saw our government working. Hooray for the revival of federalism.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Real Story of Election 2016


There have been a number of releases of late where we are seeing substantive investigative works of journalism on the 2016 election that blindsided the pundit and the political classes and gave us President Trump.

Salena Zito and Brad Todd in their remarkable book titled “The Great Revolt” have shifted the focus from candidate Trump to the voters who elected him president, creating the electoral earthquake of 2016. So did Dan Balz in the Washington Post.

All of this on the seismic shift in Pennsylvania, Michigan, Iowa, Wisconsin and yes, Ohio.

We’re starting to get a more nuanced picture of the “why” behind this quake. The key theme is status—a fundamental conviction that elites of LA, Silicon Valley, Manhattan and Washington wore a collective, fixed sneer toward their “lessers” between the coasts. Midwestern swing voters felt, to use the cliché from sports, “disrespected.”

This is the real story of 2016.

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Jerry Bowyer: Trouble for Silicon Valley


The investor who bet on PayPal, bet on Facebook, and bet on Trump is now betting against Silicon Valley. I’m talking about Peter Thiel and his announcement that he’s leaving the Valley for Los Angeles. For years, Thiel has been ahead of the curve when it comes to investing and culture. And now he’s signaling possible trouble for Silicon Valley.

Thiel’s leaving because, in his words, Silicon Valley has gone from just liberal to a one-party state. They were always left-wing. Now they’re so radical that it’s hurt their ability to produce successful companies.

A city built on the principles of innovation and openness has sheltered itself from dissent. If they’re not open to new ideas, they can’t innovate, and if they can’t innovate, smart investors and entrepreneurs will find the places that can.

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Hugh Hewitt: Americans And Contact Sports

U.S. Senate

The United States of America isn’t defined by Beltway or Manhattan elites, nor by those in Los Angeles or Silicon Valley. The mainstream media gets its cues from the collective consciousness of these four isolated reserves of great power, wealth and fame.

Donald Trump’s sparring with elites, though, is deeply satisfying to much of the rest of the country that doesn’t live in those four sectors… at least that sparring is satisfactory most of the time. There’s a limit, however, to how much good the president does by dominating media. The president met and exceeded that limit with the escalation of his war with Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski via tweets. These tweets were wrong because they were cruel. They don’t energize the base, except at its far fringes. They shrink it.

Americans do love contact sports. We swoon for heated rhetoric. If Trump can resolve to stay combative but back off cruel, it won’t matter whether he tweets once or 100 times a day.

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