Tag Archives: social media

Albert Mohler: The Tech Giants Embrace Cancel Culture

Many of you tracked with the fact that both Facebook and Twitter have banned or suspended President Trump.

You’re also likely aware that the Parler app has been suspended by both Google and Apple. We’re looking at a major change in the entire landscape of social media, and we’re looking at unprecedented territory.

What does it mean? First, of course, it means that President Trump is likely to have a great deal of difficulty reaching his base.

But, the second issue is not really about President Trump at all. It’s about the power of these social media giants—and the rise of cancel culture.

We should be first to point out that there is never an excuse for inciting violence through social media or any other form of media. We should also understand that something far short of inciting violence could incite these kinds of policies.

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Jerry Bowyer: Anti-Conservative Bias in Big-Tech

Social media censorship has reached a new low, with Twitter’s suppression of a New York Post story that looks bad for Biden. Last week, the Post published a report containing emails from Joe Biden’s son, Hunter, that suggest corruption on both their parts.

Almost as soon as the article was published, Twitter and Facebook got to work trying to scrub it from existence. Both tech giants prevented users from posting the article—and even banned some who did.

It’s another example in a long line of anti-conservative bias in big-tech.

Their underlying motivation for suppressing this story is simple: they want Biden to win and Trump to lose, so any story bad for Biden must be thrown into the memory-hole.

We can debate whether there’s a necessity for government action—but we should absolutely see action from shareholders—investors who have the power to demand an explanation for big tech’s appalling censorship of inconvenient journalism.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Business Community and Our Current Crisis

The respected research firm The Morning Consult just released new findings about how Americans want the business community to respond to our current crisis.

At the top of the list, they want businesses to set up a fund to help small businesses recover from looting, with a net positive approval of almost 50 percent.

Towards the bottom of the list we see things like supporting protestors on social media.

There’s no real consensus on statements of support—whether for protestors or for the police.

The bottom line is that people want companies to actually help, not to pose, and the group they want helped are the victims of the looting and rioting.

Facile expressions of woke solidarity are not taken seriously by customers. The people see past it.

Businesses should shift towards more even-handed and constructive responses or they risk losing the respect of their customers.

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Jerry Bowyer: Corporate Activists Start Facing Accountability

The Trump Administration is going after public corporations for playing politics. After years of ideologues dominating everything from social media companies to investment banks, our government is now putting them under scrutiny.

The SEC is reviewing so called environmental, social, governance funds, which often participate in ideological activism as a form of “risk-management.” The Justice Department is on-board too, having recently proposed a substantial revision to the legal code that has protected social media companies since 1996.

Corporate leaders have responsibilities to their shareholders—namely: providing a reasonable return on their investment as stewards of their money. Corporate activists have been selling their politics under the guise of “risk management”—thus pushing corporations to the left with no consequences. There was a time when kowtowing to pet causes of the left seemed like it was a safe option. That certainly isn’t true anymore.

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Owen Strachan: The Critical Role of Fathers

It was heartwarming to see: many of the planet’s toughest and best athletes telling their children on social media how much they love them. In short videos, fathers played games with their kids, bearhugged them, and told them jokes—all in a tribute to dads on Father’s Day.

In a society that does little to encourage fathers, the NBA’s efforts did not go unnoticed. Families are the essential building block of society, and fathers are the essential building block of the family. A home led by a father, especially a father with a spiritual focus and strong character, places flourishing within reach.

Gender-neutral children do not need gender-neutral parents. Boys and girls need fathers and mothers bound by lifelong commitment. This isn’t a prejudicial belief. Downplaying fatherhood sets us all up for disaster.

Social-media support is great. But we need more: we need a society that celebrates, honors and ennobles fathers.

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Michael Medved: Not All Screen Time Is Created Equal

An important new study from the American Medical Association makes the point that children hurt their school performance not by the total hours they spend on “screen time” but by the kind of screens they choose to watch.

In the journal Jama Pediatrics, the authors summarize 58 studies published in recent years. Their conclusions show that time spent watching TV or playing video games is just as destructive as experts have long maintained—particularly damaging children’s achievement during their teenage years.

But other sorts of screen time—like social media on smart phones, or surfing the web—prove far less destructive because they’re less passive, more communicative.

In an era when parents sometimes spend thousands on tutors to boost a child’s academic prospects, they could produce better results by strictly limiting time gawking at the tube, or lost in the fantasy world of video games.

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Owen Strachan: Our First Institutions at Risk

Are the kids okay?

According to a new poll from the Wall Street Journal and NBC, just 30 percent of millennials and Generation Z say religion is important to them. Only 40 percent of young people say being patriotic is important—and one-third say having children is important.

Polls come and opinions go, but this data represents a real change in the thinking of America’s young. If religion, country, and children aren’t of great consequence, what is in this life? Staring at social media? Playing games? Watching movies?

Something profound is happening in America. Our youth are in danger of living frictionless, commitment-free lives. We need a recovery of confidence in our first institutions: church, family, nation. We are—young and people and older people alike—called to build a life build on something more than our own self-interest.

Let’s get back to business. Let’s look beyond ourselves. Let’s do hard things.

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