Tag Archives: social media

Owen Strachan: Our First Institutions at Risk

Are the kids okay?

According to a new poll from the Wall Street Journal and NBC, just 30 percent of millennials and Generation Z say religion is important to them. Only 40 percent of young people say being patriotic is important—and one-third say having children is important.

Polls come and opinions go, but this data represents a real change in the thinking of America’s young. If religion, country, and children aren’t of great consequence, what is in this life? Staring at social media? Playing games? Watching movies?

Something profound is happening in America. Our youth are in danger of living frictionless, commitment-free lives. We need a recovery of confidence in our first institutions: church, family, nation. We are—young and people and older people alike—called to build a life build on something more than our own self-interest.

Let’s get back to business. Let’s look beyond ourselves. Let’s do hard things.

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Albert Mohler: The Social Media Revolution

A new study reveals a correlation between the social media engagement of teens and loneliness.

The headline in USA Today: “Teens aren’t socializing in the real world. And that’s making them super lonely.”

The story tells us that research into 8.2 million adolescents found that the percentage of high school seniors who said they often feel lonely has increased from 26 percent in 2012 to 39 percent in 2017.

So: In just five years we’ve seen more than a double-digit increase in high school seniors who often feel lonely in the digital age.

If this is true of seniors in high school, what must it say about their younger siblings, their cousins and their friends? There must be an even greater vulnerability as this report makes clear.

Perhaps the term “social media” has been misleading all along … and maybe the social media revolution was never merely a technological revolution, but also a moral revolution. That’s a fact we dare not miss.

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American Foreign Policy After the Iran Deal


Townhall Review – July 28, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and New York Times columnist, Bret Stephens, talk about Iran’s latest threats to the United States following President Trump’s decision to pull out of the Iran Nuclear Deal. Hugh Hewitt and Rep. Mike Gallagher discuss President Trump’s recent speech on upgrading the U.S. military. Phil Cowan and Jonathan Keller of the California Family Counsel discuss the postponement of California AB2943. Dennis Prager and Kimberly Strassel of the Wall Street Journal look at the latest developments in the “Russian Collusion” investigation. Michael Medved looks at how the Democrats flirting with Democratic Socialism might affect Republican chances in the midterm election. Michael Medved examines the impact foolish social media posts or stupid comments from long ago might cause some good, talented people to not seek public office. Mike Gallagher invites former press secretary Sean Spicer to look back at his career in his new book, The Briefing.

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Albert Mohler: Social Media and Our Brave New World


Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg has acknowledged that an app was able to gain and then to manipulate the personal data of about 50 million Facebook users for a political purpose. Zuckerberg said, “We will learn from this experience to secure our platform further and make our community safer for everyone going forward.”

Looming over this controversy is the entire world of modern social media.  In a way that even George Orwell and Aldous Huxley could not have foreseen in their worst nightmares, social media has lured millions and millions of us to surrender our own personal, private information to the world.

The most important thing to understand from this story is the two-edged sword of technology. Some technologies can bring about great good. Others bring about evil, but the reality is that even the most benign of technologies is still a technology that can almost always be misused.

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Albert Mohler: A Government Ministry of Loneliness

Billy Graham

One of the saddest headlines I’ve seen in a very long time comes to us in the New York Times. The headline article: “U.K. Appoints a Minister for Loneliness.”

 

A 2017 report indicated that “more than 9 million Britons often or always feel lonely.”

 

The extremes of age are identified as two very urgent problems: loneliness amongst the young and loneliness amongst the aging.

 

The breakup of the family, and especially the demise of the extended family, will explain why so many especially amongst the elderly are cut off. And the advent of social media helps to explain the impact of loneliness in epidemic proportion amongst young people.

 

But the sad reality is that when a government establishes a minister for loneliness it’s an affirmation of a problem; it’s not likely to be a step towards the solution.

 

To put the matter bluntly, government can’t be our friend. When human connection breaks down at a most fundamental level, no government can solve the problem.

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David Davenport: What Kind of Country Wants Media Stars for President?

Compromise

Social media blew up when it appeared that Oprah Winfrey might run for president.  Think of it:  two billionaire media stars who had never held political office running for president. Only in America.

But the deeper question is why voters are turning in this direction?  Besides their obvious frustration with politicians, voters seem more interested in making statements than actually governing. We don’t know what policies Oprah might follow and, even after a year, Trump’s policy approach is still taking shape.  But they do make a statement.

A related problem is that the presidency is becoming all bully pulpit and no real leadership, all hat and no cattle as they say in Texas.  We want superheroes and action, not mature deliberation.  What passes for action in Washington these days is party-line votes and executive orders, not working through complex issues.

Citizens have duties, too, and we shouldn’t vote just to express frustration, but to guide the policy and governance of the nation.

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