Tag Archives: Supreme Court

Michael Medved: Altering America Beyond Recognition

Every election, candidates claim: “This is the most important election of our lifetime” but that’s generally untrue. For better or worse, no President since Reagan has profoundly transformed the country, but 2020 could well be different.

Democrats seem determined to run on a radical, irresponsible platform that includes the Green New Deal, race-based reparations, Medicare for all, “soak the rich” Tax hikes, and free pre-school and college. Such programs would bring a vast expansion of the welfare state, strangling growth and swelling budget deficits.

Even worse, Democrats seek permanent rule by discarding the Electoral College, packing the Supreme Court, and destroying conservative media with some version of the discredited “fairness doctrine.” They also seek instant statehood for Washington D.C. and Puerto Rico—guaranteeing four new Democratic Senators. If Democrats sweep both White House and Senate next year, America could be altered beyond recognition – perhaps beyond recovery.

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David Davenport: Court Packing Madness

While the rest of us enjoy basketball’s March Madness, progressives are creating madness of their own. The latest is their proposal to pack the Supreme Court by adding new seats on the Court for the next president to fill. This is clearly a political ploy to change the present 5-4 conservative makeup to a 6-5 liberal one.

Writer Wynne McLaughlin said, “Maybe history wouldn’t have to repeat itself if we listened once in a while.” Obviously, progressives aren’t tuned into history because the last time this was proposed, by President Franklin Roosevelt in the 1930s, even his own party said no.

Packing the Court will become an endless project, with every new president and congress tempted to change the makeup, and the Court will become more polarized, not less. A far better reform would be term limits for justices.

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David Davenport: Let Him Bake Cake

You may remember the baker Jack Phillips in Colorado. As a Christian, Philips felt he could not in good conscience decorate cakes celebrating events that did not square with his beliefs.  The Colorado Civil Rights Commission opposed him and, finally, the US Supreme Court said the Commission had acted prejudicially.

But within weeks of the Court’s decision, the Civil Rights Commission brought another case against Phillips for declining to customize a cake celebrating a gender transition.  One Commissioner took to Twitter calling him a “hater.”

Finally, after six and a half years, the Commission has decided to withdraw its complaint and let him bake cakes in peace.  Perhaps the change from Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy to Brett Kavanaugh was a reality check.

First Amendment religious rights and Fourteenth Amendment civil rights are sometimes in tension, but religious rights must not be put down by government agencies.

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Hugh Hewitt: In Appreciation of the “Trump Judges”

Conservatives—and, in particular, Evangelicals—who minimize the importance of President Trump’s judicial appointments betray a naivete about the growing perils to religious liberty in our country today.

Too many do not grasp the sheer number of cases on the religious clauses of the First Amendment that have reached the high court in recent years.

The Hobby Lobby decision in 2014 and the Masterpiece Cake decision of 2018 are perhaps the highest profile of the enormously important decisions we’ve seen.

And the cases keep coming:

The court has recently agreed to review decisions by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit on the ability of two Catholic schools in California to operate out of Christian conviction.

The answer from the court will be crucial to the future of religious education across the country.

For those whose faith is crucial to their lives, the “Trump judges” make all the difference in the world.

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Albert Mohler: 2018: A Whirlwind of a Year


2018 now enters the history books with more of a bang than a whimper. It was the year Brett Kavanaugh joined the Supreme Court, President Trump restructured his cabinet, Democrats celebrated a “blue wave” in the House, and the partisan divide only deepened.

It was the year that titans in the digital world began to feel the heat of international scrutiny and the stock market scored a big zero. California was threatened by the deadliest wild fires in state history and disasters dotted the globe, but in Thailand, a soccer team including 12 boys and their coach were rescued from a flooded cave as the world watched and prayed.

There was a royal wedding in Britain and the world said goodbye to scientist Stephen Hawking and to both President George H. W. Bush and his wife, Barbara. An historic age of world evangelism came to an end with the death of Billy Graham.

It was a year for the ages, and now it is history.

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Accusations Against Kavanaugh and Prospects for Confirmation


Townhall Review – September 22, 2018

As the Democrats launch a last-minute effort to derail the Kavanaugh confirmation, Hugh Hewitt talks with Senator Grassley about the possible testimony of Kavanaugh’s accuser, Christine Ford. Mike Gallagher and Ed Morrissey examine the latest details. Hugh Hewitt solicits the opinion of Congresswoman Martha McSally of Arizona on the hearing and talks about the congresswoman’s campaign for the U.S. Senate. Michael Medved looks at Seattle’s rampant homelessness and the direction Seattle’s government is heading to address the problem. Mike Gallagher looks at job growth among the “underclass” with Alfredo Ortiz, President of the Job Creators Network. Hugh Hewitt talks with Bob Woodward about his new book, Fear on the Trump Administration. Michael Medved talks with journalist James Robbins about his new book, Erasing America: Losing our Future by Destroying our Past. Larry Elder reacts to a leaked video of a Google “all-hands” meeting shortly after President Trump’s election victory.

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Democrats Turn Supreme Court Hearings Into Circus


Townhall Review – September 8, 2018

Senator Ben Sasse comments on the chaotic Supreme Court confirmation hearing with Hugh Hewitt. Larry Elder looks at how Senator Dianne Feinstein is trying to make the Supreme Court confirmation all about abortion. Michael Medved asks why Nike appears to be entering the political arena. Hugh Hewitt discusses Bob Woodward’s book about President Trump’s White House with Mike Allen of Axios. Creating race issues where there are none. Dennis Prager takes on the word “monkey.” Michael Medved is joined by author Heather MacDonald to talk about her book, The Diversity Delusion: How Race and Gender Pandering Corrupt the University and Undermine Our Culture. California Democrats want everyone to boycott In-N-Out Burger but Californians are double fisting burgers and business is up. Dennis Prager examines.

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