Tag Archives: Supreme Court

Albert Mohler: SCOTUS Takes Up California’s Abortion Law

Headlines

The Supreme Court recently announced that it will take a very important case.

A California law requires crisis pregnancy centers to inform women who come to the centers of the availability of abortion, even requiring the use of specific language. Several of these centers have challenged the constitutionality of this California legislation, arguing that the bill violates their religious liberty, and their free speech, requiring them to state speech to the women who come into those clinics that violates their own convictions.

It is indeed the case that if a crisis pregnancy center in California can be required by law to use government mandated language about abortion, then free speech really doesn’t exist. If the government can mandate the use of language that violates the convictions of the very people who established and volunteer in these crisis pregnancy centers, then religious liberty doesn’t actually exist.

There is no greater moral issue faced by the generation of Americans now living than abortion, and the Supreme Court has decided to wade back into those waters.

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David Davenport: Balancing Religious Rights With Health Care

Compromise

This is David Davenport of the Hoover Institution for Townhall.com.

Public policy is full of difficult dilemmas, tough cases where there are strong interests on both sides.  Such dilemmas are not usually solved as much as they are managed.

That’s why two federal departments recently expanded the rights of religious employers.  During the Obama years, the federal government had required religious employers to provide birth control coverage in their health insurance plans even when contrary to their religious beliefs.  And the government had limited the rights of religious employers to hire or favor people who shared their beliefs.

This action properly swings the pendulum back in favor of religious rights, which are protected by the First Amendment.  Civil rights are also constitutionally protected, which is what creates the tension.  In the end, both rights are powerful, but neither is absolute.

A liberal president pushes too far in one direction and a conservative administration appropriately pushes back.  Ultimately, the Supreme Court may well have to decide how to manage this difficult dilemma.

I’m David Davenport.

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Terror Strikes Manhattan

Opioids Tariffs

Townhall Review – November 04, 2017

European-style terrorism has now made its way to Manhattan. Mike Gallagher invites Dr. Zhudi Jasser, author of The Battle for the Soul of Islam on to shed some light on it. Hugh Hewitt asks Wisconsin Congressman Mike Gallagher, a former Marine Officer, if there is a way to stop these type of attacks. Salem host Mike Gallagher sorts through Mueller’s indictment move with Ben Domenech of The Federalist. Hugh Hewitt talks with Alliance Defending Freedom’s CEO, Mike Farris, on the upcoming Supreme Court case involving Masterpiece Cake Shop. Larry Elder speaks with California Policy Center’s Steven Greenhut on the State of Illinois attempting to pass legislation requiring mandatory union membership. Dennis Prager turns to former U.S Attorney Andrew McCarthy to focus on an NYT article on Russian collusion. Hugh Hewitt turns to undercover FBI agent Tamar Elnoury about a book entitled American Radical. Just ringing in the 500th year of the Protestant Reformation, Hugh Hewitt invites Eric Metaxes on to share about its importance and how it affects our country’s religious freedom.

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Michael Medved: Appropriate Praise For The Trump – McConnell Team

Opioid

Some conservatives expressed dismay, and even a sense of betrayal, over the President’s recent press conference with Mitch McConnell, in which Trump praised the Senate Majority Leader for his loyalty and effectiveness. What did Trump have in mind, McConnell’s many right-wing critics seemed to wonder?

Very likely, he appreciated the Kentucky Senator’s stellar record on Judicial nominations. It’s not just that McConnell blocked Obama’s Supreme Court nominee, Merrick Garland, enabling the superb appointment of Neil Gorsuch. He also delayed scores of liberal lower court nominees, so that Trump took office with 107 key vacancies to fill—more than four of the last five presidents going back to Reagan.

Kimberley Strassel of the Wall Street Journal praised both McConnell and Trump for nearly 60 consistently conservative judicial appointments so far. She wrote: “McConnell just happens to have a steely passion for remaking the judiciary and deserves credit for the extraordinary class of judicial nominees now coming through.”

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Hugh Hewitt: The White House West Wing (Staff) Renovation

U.S. Senate

The exit of Stephen K. Bannon completes a restructuring of the West Wing that began almost as soon as the president took office and is now apparently complete. Like the physical renovation of the West Wing, it was noisy, not very attractive … but it was necessary.

What is needed now are successes in cooperation with Congress—beyond confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, the Veterans Affairs reform bill, and the 14 Congressional Review Act laws that were all enormously significant—but those were low-profile victories, and it seemed like Gorsuch was half a year ago.

What is needed above all is either a tax bill or resurrection of the health-care fix. Slashing the corporate tax rate is probably the easiest (and perhaps most economically significant) bit of legislation to accomplish—but so too must arrive the repeal of the Budget Control Act, which has devastated national security via the “sequester” and hamstrung a key Trump promise, that of a 355-ship Navy.

The staffing reset—along with a rhetorical reset from President Trump himself begun last week—can help get things moving.

 

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Albert Mohler: One of the Biggest Religious Liberty Decisions in Decades

Billy Graham

Every last week of June, every year, Americans get treated to what’s essentially a great civics lesson, a reminder of the enduring importance of the third branch of our constitutional system, as the Supreme Court releases major decisions, clearing its docket before its July recess.

And this June was a huge day at the United States Supreme Court in terms of our nation’s history on the issue of religious liberty.

The case I’m referring to most immediately is that of Trinity Lutheran vs. Comer—where a church was turned down by the state of Missouri for state funds from a state program that refurbished playgrounds using recycled equipment from tires.

With a 7-2 majority, the Supreme Court sent a decisive signal—making clear that the state of Missouri does not have the right to refuse the funds even to a Christian or religious school for the general kind of purpose that was reflected in this playground resurfacing for the safety of children.

It’s one of the biggest religious liberty decisions in decades—and it matters for us all.

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Hugh Hewitt: End The “Blue Slip” Tradition

U.S. Senate

The appointment of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the United States Supreme Court was President Trump’s greatest achievement in his first 100 days in office.

Now there are 20 vacancies on the federal circuit courts of appeals and hundreds on the district and special courts, but a huge obstacle stands in the way of the Senate confirmation process: the so-called “blue slip.”

The blue slip is sent to the senators from the home state of every judicial nominee, allowing those senators to approve or veto the nominee.

The blue slip isn’t a law, and it would be anathema to our Constitutional framers. It’s a leftover of decades past, a means by which individual senators could control their region’s judicial future.

It will be up to Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley to seal his place in Senate history as a deeply committed constitutionalist.

If Grassley rids the Senate of the practice forever, his place in the chamber’s history will be secured as a leader who sought to rebalance the institution’s practices in alignment with the framer’s intentions.

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