Tag Archives: Supreme Court

Hugh Hewitt: The White House West Wing (Staff) Renovation

U.S. Senate

The exit of Stephen K. Bannon completes a restructuring of the West Wing that began almost as soon as the president took office and is now apparently complete. Like the physical renovation of the West Wing, it was noisy, not very attractive … but it was necessary.

What is needed now are successes in cooperation with Congress—beyond confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Neil M. Gorsuch, the Veterans Affairs reform bill, and the 14 Congressional Review Act laws that were all enormously significant—but those were low-profile victories, and it seemed like Gorsuch was half a year ago.

What is needed above all is either a tax bill or resurrection of the health-care fix. Slashing the corporate tax rate is probably the easiest (and perhaps most economically significant) bit of legislation to accomplish—but so too must arrive the repeal of the Budget Control Act, which has devastated national security via the “sequester” and hamstrung a key Trump promise, that of a 355-ship Navy.

The staffing reset—along with a rhetorical reset from President Trump himself begun last week—can help get things moving.

 

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Albert Mohler: One of the Biggest Religious Liberty Decisions in Decades

Billy Graham

Every last week of June, every year, Americans get treated to what’s essentially a great civics lesson, a reminder of the enduring importance of the third branch of our constitutional system, as the Supreme Court releases major decisions, clearing its docket before its July recess.

And this June was a huge day at the United States Supreme Court in terms of our nation’s history on the issue of religious liberty.

The case I’m referring to most immediately is that of Trinity Lutheran vs. Comer—where a church was turned down by the state of Missouri for state funds from a state program that refurbished playgrounds using recycled equipment from tires.

With a 7-2 majority, the Supreme Court sent a decisive signal—making clear that the state of Missouri does not have the right to refuse the funds even to a Christian or religious school for the general kind of purpose that was reflected in this playground resurfacing for the safety of children.

It’s one of the biggest religious liberty decisions in decades—and it matters for us all.

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Hugh Hewitt: End The “Blue Slip” Tradition

U.S. Senate

The appointment of Justice Neil Gorsuch to the United States Supreme Court was President Trump’s greatest achievement in his first 100 days in office.

Now there are 20 vacancies on the federal circuit courts of appeals and hundreds on the district and special courts, but a huge obstacle stands in the way of the Senate confirmation process: the so-called “blue slip.”

The blue slip is sent to the senators from the home state of every judicial nominee, allowing those senators to approve or veto the nominee.

The blue slip isn’t a law, and it would be anathema to our Constitutional framers. It’s a leftover of decades past, a means by which individual senators could control their region’s judicial future.

It will be up to Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Charles Grassley to seal his place in Senate history as a deeply committed constitutionalist.

If Grassley rids the Senate of the practice forever, his place in the chamber’s history will be secured as a leader who sought to rebalance the institution’s practices in alignment with the framer’s intentions.

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THR 4/8/17 Dems Last Effort to Stop Gorsuch

Opioids Tariffs

We look at the last effort by Democrats to stop the nomination of Judge Gorsuch. Also, Susan Rice is back in the news. And Hugh talks with the subject of the new movie, The Case for Christ.

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Michael Medved: Honor The Law, Not Feelings Or Favoritism

Opioid

Democrats opposed to the Supreme Court nomination of Neal Gorsuch cite his “legalistic” failure to show consistent favor to “the little guy” against big corporations. But Gorsuch defenders insist that an impartial judge can’t allow emotion to tilt the scales of justice.

In this, Gorsuch echoes both his mentor, Justice Scalia, and the Bible. In Leviticus God commands: “You shall not commit a perversion of justice; you shall not favor the poor, and you shall not honor the great.” The prophetic books and the New Testament Book of Acts make similar points, describing God as “no respecter of persons” who applies standards equally.

Traditional Jewish commentators insist on a crucial distinction between charity—which is a personal obligation to show mercy to the unfortunate—and justice—which is a communal responsibility to honor the law above feelings or favoritism.

We must remain a nation of laws, not men; of principle, not personal preference.

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Gorsuch: Eminently Qualified

Billy Graham

New York Senator Charles Schumer recently announced that he and his Democratic colleagues in the Senate will filibuster the nomination of Neil Gorsuch to the United States Supreme Court.

The reality is that if there is anyone qualified to sit on the U.S. Supreme Court, it is Judge Neil Gorsuch.

Nonetheless, what is at stake is not the judge’s qualifications, but his understanding of the constitution as a text limited by its words and sentences and the intention of its authors, rather than an evolving text to be interpreted by contemporary judges according to their own current political understanding.

If indeed the Democrats follow through with a filibuster on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch, then Republicans must change the rules of the Senate, to make certain that this presidential nominee sits on the United States Supreme Court.

The battle over the Court in this generation is not happening by accident. It is happening precisely because both sides understand just how much is truly at stake.

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Albert Mohler: Justice Alito’s Warning

Billy Graham

Justice Samuel Alito of the United States Supreme Court recently delivered a bracing message to a group of Catholic lawyers.

Justice Alito said, “A wind is picking up that is hostile to those with traditional moral beliefs.” Referencing his minority opinion in the Obergefell decision, which legalized same-sex marriage nationwide, he said that the decision would be used to “vilify those who disagree, and treat them as bigots.”

It is clear that Justice Alito is very concerned. Those who pressed for the legalization of same-sex marriage are now pressing for the normalization of all same-sex relationships throughout the entire culture.

He went on to say that “we are likely to see pitched battles both in the courts and in Congress, state legislatures and town halls, but the most important fight is for the hearts and minds of our fellow Americans.”

Here you have a justice of the Supreme Court saying that the biggest case is not the case before his court, but the one in the court of public opinion.

We cannot say that we were not warned.

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