Tag Archives: tariffs

Hugh Hewitt: Trump Won Big

President Trump scored a big win last week after his weeks-long confrontation with Mexico over our neighbor’s lax enforcement of its southern border, and it’s left his critics sputtering.

They’re scrambling to find some way of containing what is a clear Trump triumph—and their flailing about denies the obvious: Trump played high-stakes poker and won a big round with Mexico on border security.

Media elites, well, many just deny it.

The voters, though— and I don’t mean the “Twitter Democrats,” but voters of all ages and ideologies—are a pretty smart bunch. They know, generally, that tariffs are a lousy idea in terms of economic growth. They know too that tariffs can be a blunt instrument of national power in confrontations unrelated to economic growth.

Trump’s record may be mixed, but not last week. Last week, he won big.

He should resume in full his push for immigration reform and border security talks with Democrats right now.

It might actually work.

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Jerry Bowyer: Economic Growth and American Greatness


It appears that the economy is slowing down and that markets are signaling even further weakening. I’ve been an economic optimist since the Trump election—especially when he made broad-based tax cuts a priority. But I did warn that the effects of the tax cuts would be short-term unless he continued to push in a pro-growth direction.

But after the cuts, the president instead pivoted towards increasing taxes on international trade. Make no mistake: tariffs are taxes. And as such, they choke growth.

And that’s exactly what has been happening.

Economic growth has gone from a sizzling summer of over 4 percent to an average fall at under 3 1/2 percent and the winter looks like it might be cooling down to under 3 percent.

If—in the president’s language—we want to make America great again—and we really want to beat China, growth is the way to do it.

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Assad Threatens Again; Obama Reenters the Stage


Townhall Review – September 15, 2018

Hugh Hewitt and Congressman Mike Gallagher take a look at the crisis in Syria, with Assad threatening to use chemical weapons. Michael Medved questions the importance of the anonymous New York Times op-ed that Democrats are salivating over. Mark Davis comments on former President Obama breaking past-president protocol, publicly criticizing the current President and the Republican Party. Google’s CEO snubs the U.S. Senate, ignoring a request to talk about media censorship. Dennis Prager and Louisiana Senator Bill Cassidy discuss the media bias against Prager University. Michael Medved’s guest, John Bozzella, President and CEO of Global Automakers, says recent tariffs imposed by President Trump are causing auto prices to soar. Hugh Hewitt talks with Ken Starr, who’s Special Counsel work lead to President Clinton’s impeachment, about the likelihood of Trump’s impeachment. Dennis Prager and his producer Allen Estrin discuss President Trump’s phone call with Jewish leaders in media and politics.

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Gassing of Civilians Puts Syria in the Crosshairs

Townhall Review – April 14, 2018

Senator Joni Ernst, a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, joins Hugh Hewitt to discuss the United States response to the deadly chemical attack by the Syrian regime leader Bashar al-Assad on the rebel-held town of Douma, Syria. Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg faced hard questions from Congress on censoring conservative content, like that of Diamond and Silk. Hugh Hewitt and Larry Kudlow, Director of the National Economic Council, take on the issue of tariffs and how it appears China has softened their rhetoric. John Fund, national affairs columnist for National Review, and Hugh Hewitt discuss the issue of alleged voter fraud in California. Dennis Prager looks at the emotional damage women may face from the “Hookup Culture.” Michael Medved looks at the reality of gun confiscation in one American city, Deerfield, Illinois. Freedom of speech on college and university campuses is under attack and Dr. Everett Piper, President of Oklahoma Wesleyan University, an outspoken proponent of freedom of speech on campus filled in Mike Gallagher to take on that subject.

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David Davenport: Questions About Walls


President Trump loves walls—besides a border wall with Mexico, he wants to erect trade walls to protect American steel and aluminum with tariffs of 25 and 10 percent, respectively.

In his famous poem about walls, Robert Frost said, “Something there is that doesn’t love a wall,” adding that before he built one, “I’d ask to know what I was walling in or walling out, and to whom I was likely to give offence.” Those are good questions for Mr. Trump’s policy.

He wants to wall out foreign products that are cheaper than American products. But this will trouble not only nations that produce them, but also American consumers who like to save money.

There’s also a question of constitutionality, since the president’s power to do this is based on national security. And the biggest question:  will tariff walls even work in a global economy?

Many important questions about walls.

 

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