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Tag Archives: townhall

Michael Medved: Topsy-Turvy Values Behind the Anti-Business “Head Tax”


A shockingly stupid proposal has outraged the business community here in Seattle, illustrating the topsy-turvy values of contemporary liberalism.

The City plans to enact a punitive “head tax” on every business with revenues of more than 20 million dollars. These companies would be forced to pay a special tax for each of their full-time employees, with the money providing more services for the homeless.

A decent government ought to encourage beneficial behavior, while discouraging self-destructive and damaging conduct. But here, Seattle leftists mean to reverse the equation: punishing job creation—good behavior that benefits everyone—while rewarding dysfunctional and destructive behavior, like camping out in public parks or under freeways. This folly demonstrates the twisted thinking that characterizes progressive ideology.

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Michael Medved: Ryan’s Retirement Refocuses the Election


Paul Ryan, a leader of exceptional decency and diligence, is leaving the House of Representatives, but his departure may help his party by refocusing the election in November.

With Ryan’s retirement, the vote in November won’t be about his record of triumphs—including tax reform and repeal of Obamacare’s mandate—or about his disappointments, such as the soaring deficits. Instead, the focus falls on the only other figure in the House well-known enough to motivate millions of voters: Nancy Pelosi. And that focus can only help Republicans, because Pelosi has done nothing to earn new support since her landslide defeat in 2010 following her prior four years as Speaker.

The people of America don’t know much about Kevin McCarthy—Ryan’s likely successor as GOP leader—but they know plenty about Pelosi, and dislike almost all of it.

Yes, Republicans can still win.

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Hugh Hewitt: Time To Secure The Border

U.S. Senate

President Trump has ended DACA and given Congress six months to take action on the issue of illegal immigration.

As Congress works to write and pass a bill, they must recognize the moral necessity of building a border wall—a border barrier—a border fence.

In July alone, there were 18,000 arrests at the border. Imagine how many were not arrested—made it past.

I’m not certain how many people were swept away by Hurricane Harvey while trying to come into this country illegally, but it had to be a significant number, drawn here by the promise of easy access across that border.

If we do not secure the barrier, we will continue to attract people to make the arduous and sometimes deadly trip that ends for too many in a Walmart parking lot, dead in the back of a truck from asphyxiation, or swept away in a flood.

We have a moral imperative to remove the incentive.

The policy that German Chancellor Angela Merkel announced a couple of years ago was essentially if you can survive the journey to Europe, you can stay here. What kind of policy is that? America can and must do better. We must be better than that.

It’s time to build that barrier.

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David Davenport: California’s Bully Federalism

Compromise

California’s travel ban, forbidding the expenditure of state money to travel to states that have policies they don’t like, is what I call bully federalism.

You may remember federalism, the idea that state and local governments retain considerable power in our federal system. Under the 10th Amendment, states can fight back and defend their powers against Washington.

But California’s federalism is not defending against federal power, it is offensive in nature, seeking to force its policies onto other states.

California doesn’t want state officials—or even university students—to travel to states that do not agree with its policies on LGBT issues. With the 6th largest economy in the world, California has the economic power to be a bully.

Do we all have to be like California? Is California the only state that gets things right? Is there no respect for the laws of other states, as seems to be called for by the “full faith and credit” provision of the Constitution?

No one likes bullies.

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Left Mocks Mike Pence for Guardrails Protecting His Marriage

VP Mike Pence

Maggie Gallagher explains “For the last ten hours, I’ve been fighting off liberals on my Twitter account outraged that Mike Pence tries to protect his marriage by not dining with women alone. They have this theory that it somehow disadvantages his women employees. I’m guessing in reality the women who work for him are grateful to have a boss who doesn’t hit on them. It’s not that hard to leave a door open or invite a colleague in” (National Pulse).  From Katie Pavlich: Men in general, but especially powerful men in public positions, should respect and learn from Pence’s boundaries. This doesn’t mean they have to make the same decisions about how to handle professional situations, but understanding why Pence behaves the way he does is helpful with navigation. He has enormous respect for his wife and the women he works with, which is why he chooses not to put any of them into a position that could be perceived as compromising (Townhall).  David French explains why Christian men do this (National Review).  From Mollie Hemmingway: All these people mocking Pence for the protections he puts on his behavior must not know the people I know or suffer the temptations I face. They must not read the headlines about marriages ending due to infidelity. I have far too many friends who found their inhibitions lowered by alcohol and distance from a spouse. The end result of their lapse in judgment has in some cases been the destruction of their marriage (The Federalist). A look at some of the crazy reactions from the left (IJR). From Jonah Goldberg: It’s a very strange place we’ve found ourselves in when elites say we have no right to judge adultery, but we have every right to judge couples who take steps to avoid it (Townhall).

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FBI Director Wants DOJ to Refute Trump Wiretap Claims

James Comey Calls For Wiretap Investigation

Comey wants the Justice Department to publicly reject Trump’s wiretap claim (NY Times).  Hugh Hewitt explains why “it’s quite possible” for Trump to be correct (Hugh Hewitt).  A former Bush attorney believes Trump is right that it happened but wrong to blame Obama (The Hill)  It wouldn’t be a complete shock if it did happen (Yahoo).  A look at Trump’s trouble and turmoil in the White House (Washington Post).  USA Today ran a list of Trump “claims without evidence” (USA Today). The media also jumped on Trump’s float that the Russians should find and release Hillary’s missing emails (The Federalist).

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Michael Medved: Trump Turns

Marijuana

For most Americans, Presidents Day counts as a trivial holiday but this year it looks as if Donald Trump made the most of the occasion. Perhaps he saw results of new historian polls and noted that the five all-time greats shared common characteristics. Lincoln, Washington, FDR, Theodore Roosevelt and Eisenhower all made a priority of finding allies in the pursuit of their governing agenda. They displayed determination and optimism rather than erratic plunges into apocalyptic gloom.

President Trump channeled that positive spirit in his speech before a joint session of Congress, emphasizing aspiration over anger, cooperation over confrontation.

Yes: it’s just one speech, but an enormous television audience helped President Trump refocus the administration on a coherent program of common sense, conservative reform. His GOP colleagues should feel relieved, while Democrats struggle to cope with a new Trump who’d rather make deals than wage twitter-wars.

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