Tag Archives: trump

Hugh Hewitt: 2020 Election Will Be About National Security

No matter how long this government shutdown lasts or how many more follow, 2020 will actually be a national security election, not an election about shutdown.

 

In the wake of Secretary of State Pompeo’s and National Security Advisor Bolton’s recent trips to the greater Middle East, we have to focus on the combustible situation in the region. It echoes that of the Balkans in the run-up to World War I. Of course, we also have the emergent threat from China … and, yes, there’s a new nuclear arms race.

 

Since the fall of the Berlin Wall, we’ve gone from euphoria through catastrophe into confusion, one which led President Obama into the fantastical view that he could remake the world by ignoring its truths.

 

We’re back where we didn’t expect to be again: Superpower competition at every level, often just under the “kinetic” phase.

 

2020 is going to be a national security election.

 

The choice: More of Trump and his policies? or back to Obama-era make-believe?

Read More »

Michael Medved: Impeachment Dreams, National Nightmares


Democratic impeachment dreams will inevitably collide with a Constitution that makes removal of a president all but impossible. With the current Senate line-up, Democrats would need to persuade 20 Republicans to join all 47 of them for the two-thirds vote to drive Trump from office.

In 232 years of Constitutional history, no US Senator—not even one—has ever voted to remove a president of his or her own party. What happened to Richard Nixon in 1974? The Watergate crisis climaxed in the midst of a midterm election campaign; a campaign in which the GOP ultimately lost 48 House seats and 5 in the Senate.

In a desperate bid to mitigate looming disaster, Senate leaders begged Nixon to resign. For the sake of his party and his country, he did so. In Trump’s case, elections are nearly two years away and, barring unforeseen, catastrophic revelations, his resignation is inconceivable.

Read More »

Jerry Bowyer: Economic Growth and American Greatness


It appears that the economy is slowing down and that markets are signaling even further weakening. I’ve been an economic optimist since the Trump election—especially when he made broad-based tax cuts a priority. But I did warn that the effects of the tax cuts would be short-term unless he continued to push in a pro-growth direction.

But after the cuts, the president instead pivoted towards increasing taxes on international trade. Make no mistake: tariffs are taxes. And as such, they choke growth.

And that’s exactly what has been happening.

Economic growth has gone from a sizzling summer of over 4 percent to an average fall at under 3 1/2 percent and the winter looks like it might be cooling down to under 3 percent.

If—in the president’s language—we want to make America great again—and we really want to beat China, growth is the way to do it.

Read More »

Medved: It’s a Wonderful Trump Spoof Raises a Serious Question


Saturday Night Live offered a pre-Christmas spoof called “It’s a Wonderful Trump,” in which their presidential impersonator gets a glimpse of how life would be different if he’d lost the election.

The skit proved only intermittently entertaining, but it suggests a response to those who blame Trump alone for our angry antagonisms. 

Imagine that Hillary won: would America be a model of harmony and civility? We’d still disagree bitterly on immigration, taxes, trade, race relations and foreign policy. 

In fact, President Hillary might have gotten her very own special prosecutor, just as Reagan, her husband and Trump did. With Congressional Republicans pushing hard to probe Uranium One, e-mails, and the Clinton Foundation, Robert Mueller might have been tapped to lead a very different investigation. 

Sure, President Trump could do more to bring the country together. But you can’t explain our present polarization as the work of a single individual.

Read More »

Michael Medved: Hurting the Press the President and the Country


Jim Acosta, the aggressively arrogant reporter for CNN, posed a recent question illustrating the biggest problem with the press.

The day after midterm elections, Acosta grilled the president by saying: “I want to challenge you on one of the statements that you made… that this caravan was an ‘invasion’ … As you know, Mr. President, the caravan was not an invasion.”

Now, if Acosta had quoted Nancy Pelosi or Chuck Schumer and then asked the president’s response, it would have been fair and appropriate, but it’s not a reporter’s job to “challenge” an official in his own name and his own voice.

Why not explore disagreements among politicians, without taking sides yourself? The undisguised anti-Trump contempt by leading journalists supports the idea that the nation’s biggest battle isn’t Democrats vs. Republicans, it’s the media vs. Trump: an impression that hurts the press, the president, and the country.

Read More »