Tag Archives: trump

David Davenport: Impeachment Is an Extraordinary Remedy

In the first 175 years of the nation, the House of Representatives impeached only one president, Andrew Johnson. Now in the last 57 years, it’s impeached two, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton, and it may be ready to impeach a third.

Why the rise in impeachments? Because we forget that impeachment is extraordinary. The normal way to remove a president is by the people through elections. The extraordinary way is impeachment, with its Constitutional requirement of “high crimes and misdemeanors.” Lacking political patience, we threaten to make the extraordinary now ordinary.

Politics is an ugly business. Quid pro quos in foreign policy? They doubtless happen more than we think and, if we don’t like them, we have a chance to cast our vote in one year. But a case of high crimes and misdemeanors demanding an extraordinary remedy?

I think not.

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Bowyer: The Markets and the Message on Impeachment


In the midst of the push to remove Trump from office, it’s important to remember what the left said last time a President was impeached. When Clinton was under threat, the media and Democratic politicians were arguing that Republicans should back off—because impeachment was bad for the economy.

CNN and NPR—among others—blamed poor market performance on GOP efforts to remove Clinton, while Democratic members of the House denounced the disruptions to markets caused by impeachment.

Now, Democrats in politics and the media are pushing for impeachment; not a single word about economic uncertainty.

If removing the president is bad for the economy then why are markets hitting record levels? The answer is simple. Markets are shrugging all this off not because removal would be good, but because they simply don’t take it seriously. They know what this is, nothing more than political theater.

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Michael Medved: Polls Can’t Predict Trump’s Democratic Opponent

Our fascination with polls sometimes produces premature conclusions about next year’s presidential race, including the assumptions that Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden will fight it out for the Democratic nomination. Past polling a year before elections has demonstrated scant predictive value: for 2004, Wesley Clark and Howard Dean were the clear Democratic front-runners, but neither survived the early primaries; John Kerry, who grabbed the nomination, ran fifth at this point.

Four years later, for 2008, Rudy Giuliani was way ahead among Republicans—topping the ultimate nominee, John McCain, more than 2 to 1. And in 2016, Donald Trump was a full six points behind then front-runner Ben Carson—who’s now in Trump’s cabinet. Primary contests are unpredictable, particularly with complicated races and multiple candidates. There’s still time for new entrants like Mike Bloomberg, or some other surprise latecomer, to shake up the faltering Democratic field.

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Impeachment Fizzles on Live Television

Townhall Review – November 23, 2019

Hugh Hewitt and Brian Hook, special representative to Iran, talks about the sanctions that have been imposed on Iran.

Hugh Hewitt talks with National Review’s Jim Geraghty about Attorney General William Barr who has said the Democrats are trying to sabotage the Trump administration regardless of the consequences.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Andrew McCarthy of the National Review about the impeachment and the whistleblower.

Hugh Hewitt asks Georgia Republican Doug Collins if Congress is getting anything done while preparing for and performing in this impeachment circus.

Dennis Prager offers his opinion on the decision by the CEO of Chick-fil-A to change the company’s charitable direction.

Hugh Hewitt talks with former U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley about her book, “With All Due Respect.”

Larry Elder explains why the Democrat-controlled House keeps changing the reasons for impeachment on an almost daily basis.

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