Tag Archives: trump

Albert Mohler: Evangelicals and Trump 2020

In the run-up to Christmas, you may have seen coverage of an editorial in Christianity Today by the magazine’s outgoing Editor-in-Chief Mark Galli, calling for the impeachment of President Trump.

The editorial set off a whirlwind.

Galli called the president’s actions with regard to Ukraine, “profoundly immoral.”

“None of the president’s positives,” Galli said, “can balance the moral and political danger we face under a leader of such grossly immoral character.”

Many looking at this have said that what is evident is a split between an evangelical elite against President Trump and populist evangelicals for the president.

I’d argue that there’s a third category—that is American evangelicals who understand fully the moral issues at stake, but who also understand the political context and have made a decision to support President Trump, not out of mere political expediency and certainly not out of naivete, but out of their own analysis of what is at stake.

That analysis, rather than CT’s editorial, is likely to have real impact.

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Jerry Bowyer: Economic Numbers Look Solid

Despite the ever-present media hysteria, it’s become clear that on the issue that really matters, Trump finished 2019 strong. I’m speaking, of course, about the economy. 2019 started with some economic turmoil and uncertainty. The trade war with China created a stock market whiplash and business anxiety.

But the data shows things have finally turned around. Economic confidence has been rising for months. 52 percent of investors approve of Trump’s handling of the economy, compared to just 32 percent who do not approve.

It’s no wonder that stocks have been hitting record highs. After the tax reform bill, the fundamentals of the economy were strong, and market performance reflected that.

That is, until the trade war killed Trump’s would-be boom in the cradle. Now that Trump is again on solid footing, he could be well on his way to victory in 2020 … as long as he steers clear of another trade war.

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Hugh Hewitt: The Death of Soleimani and the Reestablishment of U.S. Deterrence

In the aftermath of President Trump’s order to kill Qasem Soleimani, the leader of Iran’s Quds Force—and a terrorist—a lot of attention is being paid to an interview I conducted with then-candidate Trump in September of 2015.

At the time, Trump was not familiar with Soleimani—and admitted as much. But he added a clue to his thinking then, citing a story written about his unpredictability. Trump told me: “you don’t want to let people know what you’re going to do with respect to certain things that happen. You don’t want the other side to know.”

What Trump has demonstrated—time and again—is the strategic value of this unpredictability combined with a willingness to use force. It has restored U.S. deterrence.

The death of Soleimani is a reminder to Iran and to the watching world that it challenges the United States at its great peril.

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Dan Proft: When Democrats Lose the New York Times…

New York Times columnist David Brooks wants Democrats to drop their impeachment gambit.

His colleague Bret Stephens wants Democratic presidential candidates to pare down their essentially socialist proposals that would Venezuela-ize the American economy.

And the brothers Emanuel—my former mayor, Rahm and Ari—don’t think it’s a good idea to tell 150 million Americans that even if they like their private health insurance they don’t get to keep it.

And what’s the response?

Elizabeth Warren continues to push her complete set of Marxist fantasies.

Joe Biden calls for fossil fuel company executives—yes—to be imprisoned.

And Pete Buttigieg wants to decriminalize all illegal drugs in the face of the opioid crisis.

As we enter the election year, Democrats are divided into two camps.

One wants to defeat Trump at the ballot box.

The other just wants to exact vengeance on Trump voters.

All the candidates to this point are in the “vengeance” camp.

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Michael Medved: Why Democrats Want Impeachment Delays

The new year brings new questions about the Democratic Party and its impeachment obsession. After urgent demands for Trump’s immediate removal, Democrats suddenly slowed down the impeachment process—delaying a Senate trial and hoping to stretch out that proceeding to the beginning of 2020’s primary season.

The Dems mean to focus relentlessly on Trump’s alleged unfitness for office, to keep attention away from their own radical agenda. They know public opinion may be closely divided on the president himself, but big majorities oppose such Democratic priorities as outlawing private health insurance, racial reparations for slavery, tax hikes, open borders, canceled college debt, and the job-killing Green New Deal.

The Democrats know that if they make the election a referendum on Trump’s polarizing personality they could possibly win. But: a pitch for votes based on their stridently progressive platform would lose in a landslide.

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