Tag Archives: violence

How Democrats Plan to Change What Makes America Great

Townhall Review – September 7, 2019

Hugh Hewitt talks judges with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Dan Proft and co-host Amy Jacobson talk with Steven Malanga, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute about the decline of major cities under Democrat control.

Seth Leibsohn and Alex Berenson talk about his book, “The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness and Violence,” and the recent U.S. Surgeon General’s statement on the dangers of recreational marijuana.

Hugh Hewitt talks with former congressman Jason Chaffetz about his book, “Power Grab: The Liberal Scheme to Undermine Trump, the GOP, and Our Republic.”

Dennis Prager asks Charlie Kirk, founder and president of Turning Point USA, why he thinks a college degree may not be worth what it costs.

Dan Proft and Amy Jacobson talk with Alliance Defending Freedom attorney Jim Campbell about a case before the Kentucky Supreme Court concerning a Christian print shop owner being persecuted for refusing to print gay pride t-shirts.

Dennis Prager looks at how far we have fallen in as a religious nation.

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Michael Medved: Glib, Simplistic and False Explanations for Murderous Violence

The horrific shooting in El Paso shows the folly behind glib, simplistic explanations for deadly violence. Twenty-two deaths in this single incident nearly equals the 23 victims in all El Paso murders last year. For more than a decade, this border metropolis of 680,000 has been one of America’s safest cities—despite widespread fire-arm ownership in Texas and limited gun regulation, exposing the illogic behind leftist attempts to blame deadly incidents on law-abiding gun owners.

Meanwhile, El Paso’s population is 82 percent Latino, with its low crime history undermining demagogues who connect Hispanic immigration with high levels of violence. In fact, three of the safest big cities anywhere—El Paso, San Jose and San Diego—each have disproportionately huge Latino populations, while cities with the highest murder rates—St. Louis, Baltimore, New Orleans, Detroit and Cleveland—have at most 7 percent Latino population, less than half the national average.

We must reject simplistic and false explanations in order to responsibly address murderous gun violence.

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FBI Investigation Grows More Precarious


Townhall Review – January 19, 2019

Andrew McCarthy, columnist for the National Review, joins Hugh Hewitt to talk about the FBI investigation that asks if President Trump is a Russian “mole.” Dennis Prager and Fox News analyst Gregg Jarrett take a look at what Prager says is, “corruption of some of the elite parts of the United States government.” Following Hugh Hewitt’s trip with National security adviser John Bolton to the Middle East, they discuss the high tension that exists there. Dennis Prager takes a look at the proposed, and even shocking, health curriculum of the California Department of Education. Dennis Prager talks with Carol Swain, founder and president of Be the People Project, who is conservative, and black, a combination that has some people strangely upset. Hugh Hewitt asks Alex Berenson about his book, Tell Your Children: The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness, and Violence. Sebastian Gorka talks to baseball great Curt Schilling about his relationship with ESPN, a relationship that didn’t last because of his conservative bent.

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Michael Medved: Black Panther’s Misleading Utopia

Opioid

“Black Panther” has made movie history as the first smash hit about a black superhero. But even as international audiences savor this splashy entertainment, it’s worth noting some necessary reservations.

 

The dialogue is full of clunky clichés, the plot is convoluted, the lavish sets and costumes look tacky and sometimes tawdry, and the special effects often fail to convince. Despite strong performances from a distinguished cast, the movie creates a totally fictitious African utopia that ignores fundamental truths about civilizations. The story centers on the fantasy kingdom of “Wakanda,” which, in carefully guarded isolation, has developed technological advances that lead the world.

 

In fact, isolation invariably produces stagnation, not progress. Moreover, Wakanda in the movie is a medieval, tribal society, choosing all-powerful rulers through trial by combat and magical incantations. In the real world, advancement and wellbeing grow reliably from democratic, free market institutions, not from authoritarian societies based on brutality and sorcery echoing Game of Thrones.

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David Davenport: Free Speech On The Decline

Compromise

One reason to be concerned about the future of America is the reduced commitment of its young people to freedom, starting with free speech.

A recent survey from the Brookings Institution indicates that 44 percent of millennials do not believe hate speech is protected by the Constitution. Moreover, 51 percent believe it is appropriate to shout down a controversial speaker, with 19 percent saying it is ok to use violence for that purpose. Mistakenly, 62 percent say the First Amendment requires one controversial speaker to be balanced by another speaker.

Today’s college students are coddled by helicopter parents and seek safe spaces on campus, not freedom. And, with little or no civic education, students do not understand the First Amendment.

Founder Benjamin Franklin said that “whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the freedom of speech.” Wake up, America, the message from our campuses is that free speech is on the decline and, ultimately, so is freedom itself.

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Hugh Hewitt: Charlottesville Violence and the Legal Consequences

U.S. Senate

All law students taking a First Amendment course, or even a constitutional law survey course, learn the rule of Brandenburg v. Ohio, a case that grew out of a 1964 KKK rally near Cincinnati.

Brandenburg provides “that the constitutional guarantees of free speech and free press do not permit a State to forbid or proscribe advocacy of using force or of law violation except where such advocacy is directed to inciting or producing imminent lawless action and is likely to incite or produce such action.”

I celebrate Brandenburg when I teach it each year. The speech at the core of that case was every bit as odious as that used by the bigots in Charlottesville this weekend. But those bigots in 1964 lacked the present ability to incite violence. Those in Charlottesville had that ability to incite violence, and they used it.

Now three are dead, including two state troopers. Others are severely injured. The investigation should be careful and professional but also resolute. Lots of people should be charged if they contributed to the mayhem that led to these deaths.

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