Tag Archives: Virus

Hewitt: An Impressive Record of Accomplishments


President Trump has record of accomplishments that’s pretty easy to compile.

Most significantly, he has brought the existential threat posed by the Chinese Communist Party into the sunlight.

Trump has buttressed the constitution—with two justices on the Supreme Court, 53 judges on the federal courts of appeal and over 140 district court judges.

President Trump’s tax cuts—along with his massive deregulation—led to 3.5 percent unemployment until the regime in Beijing acted with criminal recklessness towards a virus that has devastated the world.

Trump’s brawling, slugging, tempestuous approach has worn down many, but his road is marked by these accomplishments.

The elites are convinced he must be beaten. But Americans want their jobs and security back. They like the police. They like civil order.

Yes: Polling shows him behind 50-year D.C. insider Joe Biden.

We’ll see.

I feel pretty good about President Trump’s chances.

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Lanhee Chen: The Key Piece for Recovery: School

College students should be returning to campus this fall.

For some colleges and universities, the decision to bring back in-person research and instruction is a matter of basic economic survival.

But even where it is not, the pandemic crisis threatens the essence of college life. Even the best distance-learning program cannot replace the normal interactions that take place on the college campus.

A return to in-person instruction should follow a strategy based on the latest science, balanced with efforts to restore campus life and protect the vulnerable.

It begins with a comprehensive testing and contact tracing plan. Colleges should also focus on residential environments where social distancing may be difficult.

Not all students or faculty will be able to come back at the same time.

Some combination of distance learning with in-person instruction will be needed.

It will be tough to bring students back to college campuses this fall, but it’s an effort well worth making.

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Hugh Hewitt: Tangible Help for Today’s Heroes

“Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few.”

So Prime Minister Winston Churchill declared to the British House of Commons in 1940 as the Battle of Britain raged in the skies and the Royal Air Force defended the United Kingdom from Hitler’s Luftwaffe.

That salute from Churchill echoes across 80 years to this day and is amplified in the praise for every front-line responder—health-care professionals, hospital staffs, nursing home workers and so on.

There’s an idea circulating through Donald Trump’s White House right now that would indeed grant eligibility to the GI Bill’s benefits to all those front-line responders who are battling the virus every day.

We should do it. Now.

Yes: We should clap these workers to and from work when we can, but we should also create for them a concrete set of economic thank-yous for those seeing us through the crisis.

It would be a tangible help for the heroes.

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David Davenport: A Different Kind of Character for a Different Kind of War

America is again at war, but war of a different kind: war against an unknown virus attacking our health, our economy, our social lives. Sadly, there is no quick knockout punch we can deliver to the enemy, no cease-fire agreement halting hostilities.

No, fighting this war will require a different kind of character. It will require the “now” generation of instant technology and immediate gratification to exhibit patience. The “me” generation must become a “we” generation.

This war will be fought on the front lines of medical science, but even more important now is the home front. We will need both rugged American individualism and community concern for one another. The golden rule—do unto others as you would have others do unto you—will be more valuable than a financial bailout or a silver bullet.

This is America’s new test of character.

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Albert Mohler: Humanity Humbled by a Virus

The global pandemic of the coronavirus has us all looking at a new normal that doesn’t feel that normal at all. We’re learning a new vocabulary, a new set of habits, a new set of rules and a new set of expectations.

There are so many deeply humbling aspects of the COVID-19 crisis.

Among them is the timing: A couple short weeks ago it would not have seemed plausible that we’d be facing a shutdown of travel between the United States and Europe; a 40 percent fall in airline travel coast to coast, and a suspension of athletic events.

School children are not in class, college and seminary students are not in classrooms and—campus by campus, school by school—the populations have been evacuated.

We should all be hoping—and praying—that social distancing will slow the spread of the virus and, soon, that we’d see an effective vaccine as well.

All of this reminds Christians that our only hope is found in Christ. Our ultimate refuge is only in the one true and living God.

We knew that, but we need to remind ourselves of that—we need to share that with our neighbors—even if we share it with our neighbors at some distance.

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