Tag Archives: Virus

David Davenport: A Different Kind of Character for a Different Kind of War

America is again at war, but war of a different kind: war against an unknown virus attacking our health, our economy, our social lives. Sadly, there is no quick knockout punch we can deliver to the enemy, no cease-fire agreement halting hostilities.

No, fighting this war will require a different kind of character. It will require the “now” generation of instant technology and immediate gratification to exhibit patience. The “me” generation must become a “we” generation.

This war will be fought on the front lines of medical science, but even more important now is the home front. We will need both rugged American individualism and community concern for one another. The golden rule—do unto others as you would have others do unto you—will be more valuable than a financial bailout or a silver bullet.

This is America’s new test of character.

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Albert Mohler: Humanity Humbled by a Virus

The global pandemic of the coronavirus has us all looking at a new normal that doesn’t feel that normal at all. We’re learning a new vocabulary, a new set of habits, a new set of rules and a new set of expectations.

There are so many deeply humbling aspects of the COVID-19 crisis.

Among them is the timing: A couple short weeks ago it would not have seemed plausible that we’d be facing a shutdown of travel between the United States and Europe; a 40 percent fall in airline travel coast to coast, and a suspension of athletic events.

School children are not in class, college and seminary students are not in classrooms and—campus by campus, school by school—the populations have been evacuated.

We should all be hoping—and praying—that social distancing will slow the spread of the virus and, soon, that we’d see an effective vaccine as well.

All of this reminds Christians that our only hope is found in Christ. Our ultimate refuge is only in the one true and living God.

We knew that, but we need to remind ourselves of that—we need to share that with our neighbors—even if we share it with our neighbors at some distance.

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Jerry Bowyer: The Economy and the Coronavirus

While we all wait to see the long-term economic impact of the coronavirus, it worth a moment to look at the economic data before the virus.

By practically every measure, the economy in January and February was not only solid, but trending upwards. Trade war uncertainty was off the radar screen and job creation was well over a quarter-million per month.

House purchases were also trending up well.

Whatever economic problems this virus brings, it will be that natural disaster’s fault and not the fault of the policy mix.

Once we get past the anxiety about coronavirus, we’re likely to see a sharp and strong recovery.

The Trump administration has proposed temporary payroll tax cuts—an idea that should happen sooner rather than later, allowing plenty of time for people to feel the recovery before they go to the polls in November.

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Hugh Hewitt: An Aggressive Posture Against Coronavirus

As we look at the coronavirus today, we do well to remember that serial under-response was the tragic story of U.S. and global reaction to the mislabeled Spanish flu of 1918. That pandemic claimed at least 675,000 lives in the United States and as many as 100 million around the world. The best guess of where it originated was—of all places—rural Kansas.

There’s no worse strategy than secrecy for safeguarding the public from a pandemic. It’s true that panic is a threat, but secrecy and innuendo fuel panic. Already, the U.S. government is behind the curve despite Trump’s demands that it get and remain ahead of coronavirus worries.

The appointment of Vice President Pence to lead is a very good development.

A virus can’t be killed with words, but panic can be steamrolled with information. Hopefully, Vice President Pence and the entire task force won’t settle for business as usual, because this isn’t a usual flu.

Better to be accused of overreaction today than convicted later of indifference.

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